Fastes stone for larger repairs (chiped chisels etc)

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KO88

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Recently I had to repair a couple of things which were pin in the ass. Quit big chip in chisel for example. I put it on the most coarse stone I got (nanohone200) and after 15mins with high pressure, almost nothing happened...

Do you guys have any experience and advice of a stone that might be fast enough for the job and won't make severe damage (like suehiro100 do).
I m thinking about venev dia stones... Is that 80/150 version too much? Or any other recommendation?

ps. don't have space for the belt grinder
 

HumbleHomeCook

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Baryonyx Manticore. Not sure of Benjamin's shipping policies though.
 

Rangen

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Venev diamond stones are great, but not particularly fast. I have the 100/240, and the 100 isn't a good choice for hogging off metal. In your position, I'd probably try the Manticore and/or Shapton Pro 120.

However, 15 minutes of pressure on Nanohone 200 with almost no results sounds off. Coarse stones like to glaze, and it can happen quite quickly. Maybe try it again, but refreshing the surface every couple of minutes?
 

captaincaed

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The big pink brick (220) is my preferred stone for hogging. Very thirsty, but no glazing issues. Will need flattening every 15-20" of serious work, especially for chisels, but it balances cutting power without leaving deep.gouges. I've used 100 grits myself.and deeply regretted it. I've heard good things about Sigma 240 also.
 

coxhaus

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The fastest repairs for chisels are the Worksharp 3000 as long as they are 2 inches are less. You set the angle and adjust to the size of the chisel and turn it on. bingo your chisel is sharp. The disc of different grits takes seconds to change. There is no real fussing with setup. This is for flat chisels. Curved chisels need to be done by hand on the Worksharp.
 
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M1k3

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60 grit -> 120 grit 3M Pro/Cubitron (there's probably other good choices, I just find this particular brand to be easily available to me and quite a good brand) sandpaper, used like someone else is paying for it. Even if you are paying for it yourself. After those 2 grits, move to stones.

Or go vitrified diamond or powered option.
 

TB_London

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For chisels a classic Norton oil stone will help get the work done quickly. Power will help though and a fairly cheap bench grinder will speed things up. A cheap bench grinder will be about the same price as a lot of the stones being recommended.
If you have a 200 stone already and it’s taking too long then you need power
 

KO88

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60 grit -> 120 grit 3M Pro/Cubitron (there's probably other good choices, I just find this particular brand to be easily available to me and quite a good brand) sandpaper, used like someone else is paying for it. Even if you are paying for it yourself. After those 2 grits, move to stones.

Or go vitrified diamond or powered option.
How long do they last? You mean stick to something flat (other side of atoma) and grind?
 

M1k3

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How long do they last? You mean stick to something flat (other side of atoma) and grind?
Fast cutting, about 1 minute. Overall about 5-10 minutes, depending on pressure and what you consider acceptable speed. I cut strips about the width of a sharpening stone and tuck the ends around the stone, and between the stone holder.
 

TB_London

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Then get a coarse Norton crystolon and then a finer Norton India to refine the scratch pattern.
Sandpaper would be fine for 1 but I’d get a stone if it’s a regular thing
 

stringer

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Then get a coarse Norton crystolon and then a finer Norton India to refine the scratch pattern.
Sandpaper would be fine for 1 but I’d get a stone if it’s a regular thing
Lately for a big repair I go coarse Crystolon to SG 500 to 2-4k synthetic finisher/aizu for knives.

For tools I go Crystolon to Washita most of the time. And if it's nice and I want a really keen edge then I finish on a Suita koppa and/or a CrO pasted leather bench strop.

Or if I am feeling lazy. I will do worn 60 grit belt and then pasted leather belt to deburr on the 1x30.
 

Tapio

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I don't know what stone is the fastest, but my 320 grit Suehiro Debado (soft) and Haidu HRC 250 (hard) both are fast enough to repair an edge of some chisel without too much effort.
 

stringer

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I don't know what stone is the fastest, but my 320 grit Suehiro Debado (soft) and Haidu HRC 250 (hard) both are fast enough to repair an edge of some chisel without too much effort.
I haven't heard of haidu before but I looked them up. Is yours a full sized stone (200mm+ long) or one of the smaller ones? I have a Debado, I forget, whatever the next coarsest one is, 280 I think. How does the haidu compare to your 320 Debado? I find my Debado to be very thirsty. But the giant real estate sure is nice sometimes
 

ian

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Personally, I wouldn’t use the 320 debado to do repairs. It’s a dish monster! Seems better towards the beginning of a polishing progression.
 

Tapio

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I haven't heard of haidu before but I looked them up. Is yours a full sized stone (200mm+ long) or one of the smaller ones? I have a Debado, I forget, whatever the next coarsest one is, 280 I think. How does the haidu compare to your 320 Debado? I find my Debado to be very thirsty. But the giant real estate sure is nice sometimes
There is a huge difference in hardness. Haidu feel pretty hard and Debado is soft. The feel is totally different. Debado wears out much faster than Haidu.
 

Tapio

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Personally, I wouldn’t use the 320 debado to do repairs. It’s a dish monster! Seems better towards the beginning of a polishing progression.
Chisels are not that challenging blades. Carbon steel and relatively small bevel area is a nice combination. Debado works fine using the whole surface of the stone.

Once I bought an used Shun Pro Sho Yanagiba. The previous owner had created a huge secondary bevel. At first I tried to take out that secondaty bevel with a coarse Atoma diamond plate but it just didn't work out. That huge VG-10 bevel was just too much for the diamond plate. After that I tried Debado 320 and it was much faster that the diamond plate. The stone lost tons of material but I was able to fix the geometry. A soft stone is a dish monster but also cuts fast. I have also a 100 grit Suehiro Deluxe Coarse Sharpening Stone. This stone is unbelievably soft. I don't know what to do with this stone.
 
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Bobby2shots

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OP, What brand and model of chisel are you talking about? Can you describe the damage you're trying to repair? (size of the chip,,, location of the chip)
 

KO88

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OP, What brand and model of chisel are you talking about? Can you describe the damage you're trying to repair? (size of the chip,,, location of the chip)
Some basic 💩
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and my answer (was quick but...)
1627072080224.jpeg
 

ModRQC

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Sigma 240 is fast enough for edge repairs and not very dishy where such work is concerned. I'd say get the smaller cheapest King 200 iterations - @Forty Ounce considers it's only mildly slower and mildly more dishy than Sigma and a pretty good bargain at that - if you don't want to spend a lot of dough and are averse to using sandpaper or your grinder. I can get it for like 30$ CAD so... even a pack of 3M Cubitron sandpaper is about half that price around here and won't ever last as long or be as much useful. But it COULD be a lot coarser if needed though. 🤷‍♂️
 

TB_London

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Ah so you’ve already got a bench grinder - that’s ideal for the task! Particularly for the calibre of chisel shown!
 

Bobby2shots

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OK. thanks KO88. Well I can tell immediately that this chisel has never been properly sharpened. I'll get into that later. Your bench grinder is probably a 2950 rpm grinder, and combined with the very coarse looking wheels, you'll probably have some issues. There are ways around that (to some degree).

First off,,, you'll need to regrind the cutting edge, but doing that on the hi-speed grinder will burn your edge. One little trick there. is to hold an ice-cube against the back of the chisel, near the tip as you grind, and be very gentle. Don't try to do it in one single pass,,,, Just "kiss" the wheel, and back off, and repeat until you have a new edge. Don't worry about forming the bevel at this stage. You should end up with a cutting edge that is blunt at this stage, because your only concern at this point, is to "square" the bevel to the side of the chisel. Sharpening the chisel comes later.

Next comes flattening the bottom of the chisel,,,, otherwise called the "back" of the chisel. You do NOT want to flatten the entire back,,,, only about an inch or so behind the bevel,,, but it has to be flattened right to the bevel. You can do this on progressive grades of silicon-carbide wet/dry sandpaper if you wish. Keep polishing until you have a shiny and almost mirror finish,,, or close to that. Just make sure you do this on a very flat surface.

Now, with the back of the chisel flattened, and a new squared edge created, you need to grind off the top of the bevel,,,, not the cutting edge. Grind (or sand) that metal away until you approach what will become the actual cutting edge,,,, but not grinding or sanding completely to that cutting edge. You'll want to leave about a millimeter or two,,,, maybe three mm, so you can create a tiny micro-bevel at the actual cutting edge. At this point, you'll have very little material to remove, and your chisel should be sharper/cleaner than it has ever been, and, you'll have a more durable cutting edge.

In the future, when your chisel starts to get dull again, it'll be very easy and quick to maintain, since you'll only have to re-sharpen the micro-bevel on a good stone, or fine sandpaper. When sharpening the micro-bevel, always repeat that step where you "flatten" the back of the chisel. It'll be very quick and easy to do next time around, because all you're really doing at this point, is knocking off a fine burr at the cutting edge.

Good luck, I hope that helps.

P.S. White abrasive wheels will run cooler than those dark gray Carborundum wheels.
 
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Tapio

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I agree with Bobby2shots. You want to have mirror polished bevel and back of the chisel. Only then your chisel can function like it’s supposed to be. The damage was so small, that any coarse stone should be fast enough to fix it.
 
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