Recipe Requested Fish stock

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Greasylake

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Hey y'all, I've made fish stocks in the past and have enjoyed using them, so with a relatively steady supply of fish bones I'd like to take it up a notch. Do y'all add anything to your stock? What are some dishes that would benefit from a fish stock? I've mostly made soups and rice, but would like to expand the list to include some different things. I can only eat so much soup and paella after all. I've currently got grouper bones, vermillion snapper bones, and yellowfin tuna bones. I have a few heads too but I usually prefer to grill them. If they would elevate a stock in some way, please let me know so I can set some aside in the future. All ideas and tips are greatly appreciated, thanks in advance.
 

Michi

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All ideas and tips are greatly appreciated, thanks in advance.
Firm white fish makes good stock. Avoid oily fish, such as mackerel and salmon. For aromatics, leek, fennel, celery, tarragon, peppercorns, bay leaf, and dill all work well. I throw in the heads too, with the gills removed.

A half-sheet of kombu never hurt things either and, of course, a splash of dry white wine is a most excellent idea :)

Start the stock from cold and skim off any protein scum that forms. Then simmer on low for about 50-60 minutes. Strain the whole lot through a fine mesh or a cheese cloth, being careful to not disturb the meat too much, so you end up with a clear stock.
 
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I had been dissatisfied with my fish stock for years. It was a problem, because I wanted to reproduce Legal Seafood's fish chowder. Finally found one I thought proper, and memorialized it in a document. It's by Jasper White, apparently, and the sweating technique turned out to be the key to what I wanted out of fish stock.

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 medium onions, very thinly sliced
4 stalks celery, very thinly sliced
2 medium carrots, very thinly sliced
2 dried bay leaves
1/4 cup roughly chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves and stems
6 to 8 sprigs fresh thyme
2 tablespoons black peppercorns
1 large (6 inches long or more) or 2 small (4 inches long or less) fish heads from cod or haddock, split lengthwise, gills removed, and rinsed clean of any blood
2 1/2 to 3 pounds fish frames (bones) from sole, flounder, bass, and/or halibut, cut into 2-inch pieces and rinsed clean of any blood
1/4 cup dry white wine

About 2 quarts very hot or boiling water

Kosher or sea salt

PREPARATION

Melt the butter in a heavy 7- to 8-quart stockpot over medium heat. Add the onions, celery, carrots, bay leaves, parsley, thyme, and peppercorns and cook, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon, until the vegetables become very soft without browning, about 8 minutes.

Place the fish head on the vegetables and stack the fish frames evenly on top. Pour in the wine, cover the pot tightly, and let the bones sweat for 10 to 15 minutes, or until they have turned completely white.

Add enough very hot or boiling water to just barely cover the bones. Give the mixture a gentle stir and allow the brew to come to a simmer. Simmer for 10 minutes, uncovered, carefully skimming off any white foam that comes to the surface, trying not to take any herbs, spices, or vegetables with it. (Using a ladle and a circular motion, push the foam from the center to the outside of the pot, where it is easy to remove.)

Remove the pot from the stove, stir the stock again, and allow it to steep for 10 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh strainer and season lightly with salt. If you are not going to be using the stock within the hour, chill it as quickly as possible. Cover the stock after it is thoroughly chilled (it will have a light jellied consistency) and keep refrigerated for up to 3 days, or freeze for up to 2 months.
 

bobo990

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I had been dissatisfied with my fish stock for years. It was a problem, because I wanted to reproduce Legal Seafood's fish chowder. Finally found one I thought proper, and memorialized it in a document. It's by Jasper White, apparently, and the sweating technique turned out to be the key to what I wanted out of fish stock.

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 medium onions, very thinly sliced
4 stalks celery, very thinly sliced
2 medium carrots, very thinly sliced
2 dried bay leaves
1/4 cup roughly chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves and stems
6 to 8 sprigs fresh thyme
2 tablespoons black peppercorns
1 large (6 inches long or more) or 2 small (4 inches long or less) fish heads from cod or haddock, split lengthwise, gills removed, and rinsed clean of any blood
2 1/2 to 3 pounds fish frames (bones) from sole, flounder, bass, and/or halibut, cut into 2-inch pieces and rinsed clean of any blood
1/4 cup dry white wine

About 2 quarts very hot or boiling water

Kosher or sea salt

PREPARATION

Melt the butter in a heavy 7- to 8-quart stockpot over medium heat. Add the onions, celery, carrots, bay leaves, parsley, thyme, and peppercorns and cook, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon, until the vegetables become very soft without browning, about 8 minutes.

Place the fish head on the vegetables and stack the fish frames evenly on top. Pour in the wine, cover the pot tightly, and let the bones sweat for 10 to 15 minutes, or until they have turned completely white.

Add enough very hot or boiling water to just barely cover the bones. Give the mixture a gentle stir and allow the brew to come to a simmer. Simmer for 10 minutes, uncovered, carefully skimming off any white foam that comes to the surface, trying not to take any herbs, spices, or vegetables with it. (Using a ladle and a circular motion, push the foam from the center to the outside of the pot, where it is easy to remove.)

Remove the pot from the stove, stir the stock again, and allow it to steep for 10 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh strainer and season lightly with salt. If you are not going to be using the stock within the hour, chill it as quickly as possible. Cover the stock after it is thoroughly chilled (it will have a light jellied consistency) and keep refrigerated for up to 3 days, or freeze for up to 2 months.
Can we have the recipe for the rest of the fish chowdre as well? I ve been to legal seefood many years (20+) ago and i still remember that chowder.
 

Michi

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I had been dissatisfied with my fish stock for years. It was a problem, because I wanted to reproduce Legal Seafood's fish chowder. Finally found one I thought proper, and memorialized it in a document. It's by Jasper White, apparently, and the sweating technique turned out to be the key to what I wanted out of fish stock.
That sounds really good! How about adding this recipe to the Recipe Forum for posterity?
 

yummycrackers

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Not sure if this can be of any use to anyone, given that it's an old thread, but what I've been trying recently is roasting my fish heads and bones before using them for stock (as one would for a brown meat stock) and cooking the stock itself for much longer (2-3 hours). The result is a darker, more intense broth that is more gelatinous, and I pass it through a chinois before using it. Depending on the use one makes of it, both of those qualities might be desirable.
 
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