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Bill Burke

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What do you guys out there think is the biggest factor in good food release? what food do you expect to not release not matter the geometry?

I find that a convex grind gives me the best release, and then of couse a convex edge helps alot with a steeper/fatter convex on the edge being very important.
 

Benuser

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I think the most important factor is the convex blade rather than the edge itself. All my edges being more or less convex I didn't notice any difference. More or less convexity of the blade though may change a lot. Another factor is the blade's finish.
 

WildBoar

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My experience is fairly limited compared to many on this forum, but the worst gyuto offenders I've tried to far were ground flat on the sides, and/ or had deeply etched damascus. The release issues with these knives really showed up for when when slicing onions, apples and garlic.

As far as foods I've come to never expect to be relased, garlic (minced) is by far at the top of my list. Adjusting technique has helped reduce it a bit, but I still need a lot of finger wipes on the two petty/ utilities I normally use for mincing. One is 52100 with some convex grind, and one is CPM154 with a higher-grit finish and less of a convex grind.
 

Salty dog

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Pronounced lower blade convexivity. (If that's a word)

Also food will stick less if the blade is shorter than the product you're cutting. In other words you may have to use a different part of the blade for different foods.
 

Johnny.B.Good

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Also food will stick less if the blade is shorter than the product you're cutting. In other words you may have to use a different part of the blade for different foods.
This never occurred to me, but it makes sense. I want to see a video of you mincing garlic Salty. It's so sticky it drives me crazy, though I'm sure my poor technique is a big part of the problem. As a result, I generally rely on this, which I'm sure you professionals would never do.

Edit: I think I have seen Pepin just smash garlic with the back of his knife and then chop what's left up a tiny bit...
 
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EdipisReks

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This never occurred to me, but it makes sense. I want to see a video of you mincing garlic Salty. It's so sticky it drives me crazy, though I'm sure my poor technique is a big part of the problem. As a result, I generally rely on this, which I'm sure you professionals would never do.

Edit: I think I have seen Pepin just smash garlic with the back of his knife and then chop what's left up a tiny bit...
i use the very tip of a gyuto for mincing garlic, and i find it to work pretty well. minced garlic is always going to stick, though, unless you teflon your knives. maybe even then.
 
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Deckhand

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This never occurred to me, but it makes sense. I want to see a video of you mincing garlic Salty. It's so sticky it drives me crazy, though I'm sure my poor technique is a big part of the problem. As a result, I generally rely on this, which I'm sure you professionals would never do.

Edit: I think I have seen Pepin just smash garlic with the back of his knife and then chop what's left up a tiny bit...
Ditto same problem. Would be a good video. Sometimes I use my knives. Sometimes a sur la table garlic chopper my mom gave me. It's like a mini slap chop. I know I know.
 
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EdipisReks

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hey, if it works for you, it works for you. i find myself using jarred minced and chopped garlic as much as fresh, these days.
 

Deckhand

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hey, if it works for you, it works for you. i find myself using jarred minced and chopped garlic as much as fresh, these days.
Actually My garlic chopper works pretty well. Unfortunately, it almost looks like those Shake a weights commercials. I guess I could have her do it for me:biggrin:
 

EdipisReks

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What would Bourdain say about us? ;)

The Rosle press actually does work well...
i've yet to see Bourdain use a knife decently, so who cares. ;)


Actually My garlic chopper works pretty well. Unfortunately, it almost looks like those Shake a weights commercials. I guess I could have her do it for me:biggrin:

as long as it has the cooling mist.
 

sachem allison

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Actually My garlic chopper works pretty well. Unfortunately, it almost looks like those Shake a weights commercials. I guess I could have her do it for me:biggrin:
your mom gave it to you, remember
 

tk59

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Pronounced lower blade convexivity. (If that's a word)

Also food will stick less if the blade is shorter than the product you're cutting. In other words you may have to use a different part of the blade for different foods.
Yup. The trick is to balance that with thickness near the edge.
 

JohnnyChance

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Minced garlic? It is always going to stick. Each piece is so small that there isn't enough convexity in that 1mm or less surface area of blade to release the little piece of garlic. Chop up the pile, wipe off the blade, reorganize the pile, repeat until it is as fine as you desire.
 

Andrew H

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Minced garlic? It is always going to stick. Each piece is so small that there isn't enough convexity in that 1mm or less surface area of blade to release the little piece of garlic.
Agreed.
 

Ordo

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Check Saltydog videos about grinding and food release.

[video=youtube;E7XTGYY4yE0]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E7XTGYY4yE0&list=UUX6VEhNbmCnY8jPrF6VTzOA&index=37&feature=plcp[/video]
 

Eamon Burke

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For me, food sticking has less to do with release and more to do with drag when cutting. Stuff will always stick to your blade to some degree. Mirror-shiny, dead flat, tall faces on thin blades are hilarious though--they collect food like hoarding drugs.
 

Bill Burke

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For me, food sticking has less to do with release and more to do with drag when cutting. Stuff will always stick to your blade to some degree. Mirror-shiny, dead flat, tall faces on thin blades are hilarious though--they collect food like hoarding drugs.
So why do so many people like laser type knives? these would seem to me to be the worst as far as food sticking to them. andthey are a ***** to grind.
 

Eamon Burke

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Because they cut better, by way of distributing force more directly and wedging less. They are also lighter, and quicker to sharpen. Not everyone worships at the altar of thin, either. I would imagine that for collectors it is also a testament to the maker's grinding skill if done well...because it is a zero tolerance PITA.
 

RRLOVER

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So why do so many people like laser type knives? these would seem to me to be the worst as far as food sticking to them. andthey are a ***** to grind.


I think that people who love a laser just deal with the food sticking.I have owned/own some thin one and they do fall through the food with ease but the food sticks badly.I personally like a more robust knife and it has nothing to do with food release.I think you can find a happy medium between laser and sturdy.
 

stevenStefano

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I am a lefty so basically I get screwed with food release no matter what, and I love my thin knives. Would an asymmetric edge not help with food release? That is what I find anyway, the release on My HD isn't bad considering the wrong side is convex for leftys. Food release doesn't mean a whole lot to me to be honest
 

tk59

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Because they cut better, by way of distributing force more directly and wedging less. They are also lighter, and quicker to sharpen. Not everyone worships at the altar of thin, either. I would imagine that for collectors it is also a testament to the maker's grinding skill if done well...because it is a zero tolerance PITA.
+1. As RRLOVER mentioned, you do deal with a little stickage using very thin knives. As I use mine, I grind an extreme asymmetry on the blade face and deals with stickage as well as most thicker knives.
 

oivind_dahle

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Best cutter Ive had was a shigefusa. And it was no laser....

Laser better cutters? Don't think so based on my limited experience...
 

JohnnyChance

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Yeah, most of the best cutters I have used are not lasers. There is just more material to work with, so the difference between the "high" and "low" spots of the grind can be of a greater difference (for lack of better words). So that can lead to less surface area in contact with the product and less sticking/friction. Depending on the thickness at and behind the edge, it can make a great cutter and one with pretty decent food release.

There is a Mighty vs Laser thread here.
 

jmforge

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It's a word now. :doublethumbsup: Are you saying that a blade that is too convexed as in too thick down close to the edge?
 

JohnnyChance

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I don't know what part of my statement you are referring to or what you are asking exactly.
 
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