For the love of cutting: a cut-vid thread for all

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Jovidah

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I usually filter stuff through a hair net (sometimes doubled up)... Just line a sieve with it and presto; end result is quite clean that way. Works great for filtering oils as well.

It definitly wasn't overroasted bones (I'm pretty dilligent about that), and I had stock go bitter a few times even when there were no other ingredients. I tend to add those later down the road. But because it only happens on rare occasions it's a bit hard to figure out.
 
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Jovidah

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Yeah then my suspicion of cooking too long was correct. It can't be the temperature since most of the time I just throw it in a low oven.... and then forget about it. :D
Thanks, I'll pay more attention to the time then. I used to think 'longer was better' but I guess that's not true.
 
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Yeah then my suspicion of cooking too long was correct. It can't be the temperature since most of the time I just throw it in a low oven.... and then forget about it. :D
Thanks, I'll pay more attention to the time then. I used to think 'longer was better' but I guess that's not true.
It needs to be long enough to extract the flavor. Veggies and fish bones take the least amount of time. Beef bones take the longest. Especially with your more delicate stocks. Over cooking / reducing can lead to bitterness.
 

Jovidah

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It needs to be long enough to extract the flavor. Veggies and fish bones take the least amount of time. Beef bones take the longest. Especially with your more delicate stocks. Over cooking / reducing can lead to bitterness.
Once you've filtered everything, what's better; reduce as fast as possible or at the lowest possible simmer?
 
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Once you've filtered everything, what's better; reduce as fast as possible or at the lowest possible simmer?
As low and slow as you are patient with. Stirring every once in awhile. Even after you think you have filtered everything there will be bits that want to sink to the bottom and stick. And boiling is bad. You destroy all the delicate scents and flavors and nutrients. So low and slow.
 
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Were the birds roasted? What became of the skin? Enquiring minds want to know!

:)
I roast the birds, pull the meat, slice the skins and then mix the meat and skin back together. We heat it up with smoky barbecue sauce and maple syrup. It's one of the protein options at my cafe. I also got house cured pork loin and braised short rib. Or vegan sausage but I just buy that. The others I make in house.
 

HumbleHomeCook

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No video, but a thank you.

Years ago, I spent a lot of time getting a decent rock-chop game. When I started thinning my Wusthof knives this really took off and I was generally pretty pleased with my knife skills. No, not in anyway professional, and sometimes less confident than others, but good enough to get more out of my ingredients. Which, after all, should be the main point for a home cook.

Then I made the step into Japanese knives and something changed. I can't remember exactly why but I feel like I had heard "experts" say that rock chopping with these knives was a path to ruin. Push cut was the order of the day if you wanted to save your precious edges and use these knives properly. It's entirely possible that was a combination of things I heard, particular knife design, and my own imagination but the result was, for a good while, I almost abandoned rock chopping in any situation.

But, watching all these videos along with a pinch of situational consideration and a healthy pinch of self reflection snapped me back into the idea that we can, and should, use different cutting styles. I know that will sound stupidly simple to so many of you and I would take no offense at it. I guess I just got caught up in it all for a time.

So tonight, I pulled my Ittetsu X-Hammer bunka off the reserve strip (where it was making it's way to the back-to-box position) and got back to work with it. I like so much about this knife but had rather quickly dismissed it due to its prominent curve. My near literal push-cut insistence resulted in a lot of accordioned ingredients so I abruptly decided it wasn't for me.

Stupid.

It did the full meal prep tonight to include thinly slicing chicken breasts, lots of veggie work, fine dicing shallot and garlic, etc. There was rock chopping, push cut, push and glide, and whatever seemed to work. I know this probably sounds painfully obvious, and I reckon it is, I'm just sharing this in case anyone else out there finds themselves feeling like me.

You can rock chop with Japanese knives and the edges will not become Swiss cheese. Be flexible and adjust as needed. No doubt, some knives will lend to certain techniques but don't get locked in.

Older picture of the referenced knife:
 
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Pie

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Footnotes

- first time recording something like this. Please excuse the setup, talking and unnecessary closeup of my face.
- I’m both slow and unsure when cutting things. Some people on here make it look sooo easy. Watching my own video is mad humbling.
- Scraping/flicking cores off the board was done using the spine, don’t worry :)
- this is kind of what I mean by “pull cut”. It’s even weirder now that I see it in action, kind of like hearing your own voice recording.
 
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Delat

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Footnotes

- first time recording something like this. Please excuse the setup, talking and unnecessary closeup of my face.
- I’m both slow and unsure when cutting things. Some people on here make it look sooo easy. Watching my own video is mad humbling.
- Scraping/flicking cores off the board was done using the spine, don’t worry :)
- this is kind of what I mean by “pull cut”. It’s even weirder now that I see it in action, kind of like hearing your own voice recording.
I work pretty slowly as well (although it looked like you cranked through that pineapple pretty fast to me). No harm in it, and it’s nice to be in the moment and not in a hurry. When I’m cooking I have no where else to be and nothing else to do - I’m exactly where I want to be, doing exactly what I want to do, appreciating a knife I want to appreciate. Why rush through it?

Also, any prep that doesn’t involve involuntary blood donation is a solid prep in my book.
 

HumbleHomeCook

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Footnotes

- first time recording something like this. Please excuse the setup, talking and unnecessary closeup of my face.
- I’m both slow and unsure when cutting things. Some people on here make it look sooo easy. Watching my own video is mad humbling.
- Scraping/flicking cores off the board was done using the spine, don’t worry :)
- this is kind of what I mean by “pull cut”. It’s even weirder now that I see it in action, kind of like hearing your own voice recording.
Excellent job. Nothing wrong with any of that! 👍
 
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Pie

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I work pretty slowly as well (although it looked like you cranked through that pineapple pretty fast to me). No harm in it, and it’s nice to be in the moment and not in a hurry. When I’m cooking I have no where else to be and nothing else to do - I’m exactly where I want to be, doing exactly what I want to do, appreciating a knife I want to appreciate. Why rush through it?

Also, any prep that doesn’t involve involuntary blood donation is a solid prep in my book.
There’s something to be said for taking the time to enjoy the process, most definitely. At first I was frustrated with the lack of speed and consistency, even more so watching people like @stringer blast through produce effortlessly. These days it’s out of necessity that I try to go faster, with 2 young children the more time I spend holding a knife the more likely someone’s going to run full speed into a doorknob or something.

Always looking for the best way to break stuff down, and once found develop the muscle memory to autopilot through a prep (while quietly marvelling at how satisfying it is).

I appreciate the kind words! These cut videos are kinda fun, looking forward to doing some more!
 
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Don't worry about the speed. That comes with time, volume and a boss staring at you like you should of been done 20 minutes ago. Even though you started on the item 15 minutes ago.
Well put Mike. I've been cooking professionally for nearly half of my life at this point. I know how to move fast because I had to learn to survive. And I've spilt a lot of blood along the way pushing the limits to build those skills. But I don't recommend trying it at home. Unless someone in your household is training to be a trauma nurse and needs the practice or something. 🤣
 

HumbleHomeCook

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Nowadays the biggest deadline I deal with is when my partner says, "Do you think you can have dinner ready in 15 minutes, I'm hungry?"

Alrighty Mr. Leek, as is sometimes the case with your videos, we have some problems here...

First of all, you're not wiping down your knife every eight seconds and in fact, you actually set it down more than once. This is... I mean... Woosh... You are aware sir, are you not, that contemporary expert assertion is that you must wipe down your knife compulsively to prevent it from rusting instantly? This just seems irresponsible. What's next? 155 degree chicken breasts? Mixing meat and veggies on the same board? Wait... Oh magosh... Oh magosh...

Okay, okay...I'm going to move on...

Ginger. Sir, with all due respect, everyone in the modern age knows you peel your ginger with a spoon. Do I really need to explain this?

:p

In all seriousness, more very cool stuff.

I found myself talking to the TV, saying, "Oh f-you!" as you so effortlessly broke down those carrots. And meant with absolute respect. I'm so consumed with getting all my planks the same, and then the sticks and then tucking them all into decidedly perfect geometric stacks before dicing... But you? Thwack, thwack, thwack. Turn. Swish, swish, swish... And it still looks great.

For me, what you did was probably 30mins. I'm not getting down on myself as I recognize the disparity in experience and skill, but rather just expressing my admiration for the abundance of yours versus the lack of mine.

Good stuff buddy.
 

Bico Doce

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You have a film crew? 🤔
When you get to my level (of mediocrity) you have to invest in a film crew. Lol

truth is I never plan on doing videos but if I am cutting something and my daughter or wife walks by I might ask them to record a bit. I just realized my son even a made a surprise appearance
 

Bico Doce

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Nice, but I got anxiety looking at that dry board; looks about a liter of oil short.
I'll be sure to top her off before posting here again. What should I use, 10w30? Or will Jiffy Lube take care of that for me?

Edit: this is me being an idiot. It's a garbage board I got a long time ago for $40 at Tj Maxx and I put minimal effort into maintaining it
 
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captaincaed

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I'll be sure to top her off before posting here again. What should I use, 10w30? Or will Jiffy Lube take care of that for me?

Edit: this is me being an idiot. It's a garbage board I got a long time ago for $40 at Tj Maxx and I put minimal effort into maintaining it
Elbow grease works for me. Apply straight from the source. Send a video!
 

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