Fresh Chili Pepper Recipes

Discussion in 'Whats Cooking? Food, Drink, & Gear' started by tgfencer, Aug 14, 2019.

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  1. Aug 14, 2019 #1

    tgfencer

    tgfencer

    tgfencer

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    So I'm rolling in fresh chili peppers this year (mostly serrano, thai birdseyes, cherry hot, habaneros). I'm frankly running out of ideas for using them all. Anybody got any recipes that use large amounts of fresh peppers or any good sauce/relish/pickling recipes that are good for canning and longer term storage?

    Cheers!
     
  2. Aug 14, 2019 #2
    I am trying to grow some chili for the first time this year, so I am going to watch this thread closely :)
     
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  3. Aug 15, 2019 #3

    Paraffin

    Paraffin

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    I don't know how well this will work with small hot chilies, but here's my one chili pickle recipe with Fresno chilies. I love how they're basically a slightly hotter jalapeno with a red color for an interesting garnish. They don't show up often in the local markets up here, so this is how I pickle them so I can use 'em for a while. It's not a full ferment/vacuum preserve, but it's good for 3 to 4 months in the refrigerator.

    I think this would work with other chilies where you want to keep using them. It's not a strong pickle, you still get a good chili flavor after a rinse. Maybe omit the charring part, although that might be interesting with habaneros. I might have to try that next.

    [​IMG]

    Spicy Blackened Sichuan Pickled Peppers, adapted from book "Asian Pickles" by Karen Solomon

    INGREDIENTS

    11 ounces Fresno chiles
    1 cup distilled white vinegar
    1 cup water
    3 thin slices ginger
    2 cloves of garlic, smashed
    1 tbsp + 2 teaspoons sugar
    1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
    1/2 cup good quality Shaoxing wine or gin (Note: I always use Tanqueray gin in this recipe and it works well)

    DIRECTIONS

    Wash the peppers and cut off the end at the stem.

    Combine the vinegar, water, sugar, and salt, stir to mix. and bring to almost a boil in a pan, then let cool. When cool, add the wine or gin.

    Lay the chilies out in a baking pan, and slightly char with a kitchen torch. Turn and lightly char the other side.

    Transfer the peppers and brine into clean jars with tight lids. Add the garlic and ginger slices as you add the chilies. Use a weight if needed to keep pickles submerged under the brine. (Note: there is a glass weight under the lid in the photo above)

    Leave on the kitchen counter for 24 hours before refrigerating. Eat after 3 days. Kept cold in the refrigerator, this pickle will keep for several months.
     
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  4. Aug 15, 2019 #4

    Caleb Cox

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    Drying is always an option, just takes space and airflow. You can add smoke to this mix if you like and have the capability. After which you could powder for absolute gold alone or in seasoning blends. When pickling chiles I pour hot brine (vinegar, sugar, salt and garlic cloves) over fresh chilies (stemmed and at least split for max yield in jars), lid and allow to seal at room temp, then refrigerate after opening. If you follow USDA canning guidelines you will end up with mush. Also PEPPER JELLY!!! Use Paula Deen's recipe (I know) from foodnetwork.com but omit food coloring and bell pepper. Use all hot chiles! If you seed them it will still be tame, and if you want a jazzy color use red wine vinegar.
     
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  5. Aug 15, 2019 #5

    WildBoar

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    x2 on pepper jelly and drying. We still have so much left from the last couple years that my wife only planted bell peppers this year. 'Course we have a pile of peaches and I want to make peach salsa, so I'll have to buy some hot peppers at the grocery store.
     
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  6. Aug 15, 2019 #6

    Michi

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  7. Aug 15, 2019 #7

    Caleb Cox

    Caleb Cox

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    Hot sauce is food group to itself of course. Chiles, vinegar and salt will get you there, with the real art being texture/viscosity. Level of pulp, straining/filtration, and viscosity modifiers like xanthan gum (careful it foams like crazy! Blend in a small volume and stir into main batch) all play in here. Flavor adjuncts are endless; sugar, garlic, thyme, cloves, lemon, etc. Use all your ventilation and prepare for the chemical assault when cooking it!
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019
  8. Aug 15, 2019 #8

    Paraffin

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    Drying is an option, yes. But if you want the mouth feel and hot like fresh, then pickling keeps both of those qualities.
     
  9. Aug 15, 2019 #9

    boomchakabowwow

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    Had a great dish a few days ago.

    They took some small med hot peppers and they were simply pan roasted in olive oil and sprinkled with salt. Tiny cast iron pan. Very dramatic and simple and tasty.
     
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  10. Aug 15, 2019 #10

    DamageInc

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  11. Aug 15, 2019 #11

    tgfencer

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    Thanks everybody, this will certainly get me started. Always nice to have a few new recipes to throw in with the standards.
     

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