Good Stainless Contenders for Cook-in-training

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torbaci

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I feel like you didnt read anything that @Chang already wrote in this thread.
it was mentioned that trainee almost bent other knives with wrong technique , so recommended a beater.

and also that they might need to upgrade their knife when their skills increase, which i disagree with.

so, yeah, ive read the posts.
 

Jurrian

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A server expressed interest in working behind the line. She's a decent person, I think she can do it, so now, first things first, she's gotta get a knife. She's pretty good with not touching my babies, but she's gotta get her own knife anyways. IMO, owning a good knife always pushes people to be more interested in cooking. Her budget is $200, and she's never used a "good" knife before.

Aiming for stainless, but, personally, I'm not a huge fan of AUS-8/10 (or any other stainless steels that sit around 58-59 HRC), AEB-L, VG10/VG1, so trying to avoid those steels. So far my list is:

210 Kaeru SLD
210 Takamura Chromax
210 Tsunehisa Ginsan
210 Hitohira SG2
210 Yoshimune Stainless Clad/Shiro2 (maaaaaybe)


Am I missing anything?
Yes for the budget you should get a tojiro
 

Jason183

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IDK what other ppl consider “beater” knives are, I mainly used my beaters for chopping bones and doing some other tougher tasks when I don’t want to risking my Lasers to do so.

I definitely won’t consider my Takamura Chromax as beater, but it is excellent and fun knife to use, it’s great choice out of that list if she don’t chopping bones or frozen products.
 

Chang

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IDK what other ppl consider “beater” knives are, I mainly used my beaters for chopping bones and doing some other tougher tasks when I don’t want to risking my Lasers to do so.

I definitely won’t consider my Takamura Chromax as beater, but it is excellent and fun knife to use, it’s great choice out of that list if she don’t chopping bones or frozen products.
just to clear things up, what I consider a beater is any knife that’s cheap and I’ll use it without really feeling remorse if I damage it. So my chromax is my current beater, I still baby the edge, but I have no problem lending it out.
 

HumbleHomeCook

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I am obviously not a pro cook but I have a Tsunehisa gyuto and nakiri in Ginsan and really, really like them.
 
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Lars

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Victorinox..

edit, op want's harder steel.

..so kaeru ftw imo..
 
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Jovidah

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The Sukenari Ginsan that was brought up in another thread is also worth considering IMO.
You might want to dig through the 'gateway knives' thread from a while back as well; it might have more suggestions that we missed here.
 

chefwp

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you’d be surprised, I’ve been beating my chromax left and right, Ike turner style and the edge is still straight and intact, and it can still cut paper towel. Insane. The R2 line is a bit more fragile though. She used my coworkers Takamura r2 gyuto and twisted the edge from doing heavy “palm assisted” cuts aka slamming your palm down on the spine to get through dense ingredients. She did the same with my chromax when I wasn’t looking. Breathed a sigh of relief when I looked at the edge and it was a-ok haha
I was gonna something similar, but focusing not so much on the fragility, I think laser-ish knives are a little harder to use for a beginner than a workhorse-ish knife. I think of your initial list, the Kaeru looks most intriguing. If you are going to teach any methods like rock chopping, maybe throw a Wusthof Icon on the table, I still use my old Wustof Le Cordon Bleu (sadly, a discontinued line) to rock through a ton of garlic the way I was taught way back when.
 

ampersandcetera

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I think semi-stainless offers more options at this price range. SLD is tough, doesn't need any babying, and will be more satisfying to learn how to sharpen. So +1 here for the Kaeru in SLD
 

deskjockey

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Is the Takamura Chromax in a different "class" from Tsunehisa Ginsan, Hiragatake SLD, TADAFUSA HK-4 GYUTO SLD, and the Harukaze G3?

I see strong recommendations for all of these but, not a lot of contrasts between them. I get there is a lot of personal preference but, for someone who is not a "PRO" in the kitchen with a limited budget (<= ~200USD), how would you contrast the differences?

I'm thinking of things like food release, stain/rust resistance, "toughness" for less skilled hands, and similar things. Or, special concerns like living in a high humidity location versus a dry one or knuckle clearance and grip comfort for non-Pro's.

Personally, I like a LAZER 240mm Gyuto for most things in my kitchen like potatoes, thin-skinned squash, tomatoes, and similar. I have the classic "German" chef knife for sweet potatoes and similar hard veggies and don't work with a lot of boned meats unless they are on the grill or in the smoker.
:)

If you want to talk smokers, I'm into WSM (Smokey Mountains), and offsets primarily but, I have most of the more common forms in my arsenal.
:swirma:
 
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