hattori cleaver vg10

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VitaminD

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Hattori fh-15 cleaver

Newbie here....

I have been doing some research but could not find any reviews about the Hattori vg10 cleaver. I have many Spyderco knives that are vg10 and it has performed well over the years but most of them are under 4" long folders. The Hattori is 8" x 4" and I want to train myself to use the cleaver for most if not all of my cutting needs (no bones) and sell off most of my other knives, So I want one of high quality and well made that will last me many years. There are many cleavers that are made from vg10 cladding from $75 to $300; shun, ran, Zhen etc. but was only able to find Hattori making a solid vg10..

1) I would like some opinions on the Hattori cleaver from users?

2) are there better options for stainless cleavers with out going to the custom market ?

3) want to keep the price under $400 if possible!

Thanks

VitaminD.
 

jaybett

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Welcome to the forum.

As you noted, the Hattori is a large knife. Are you comfortable using a knife that big? It's not unusual to see a person who has bought four or five gyutos, try a different blade type. Often times it will be a cleaver. Most of the time, they can't put the cleaver down fast enough. Even people who prefer small cleavers, do not care for the larger ones. They are different beasts, from what most are used to. Because of this, the common advice on the forum has been to try a full size cleaver, like the Suien, before getting a more expensive one.

Full size cleavers tend to be rough, when it comes to fit and finish. After grinding such as large blade, it seems like most manufacturers, slap on a handle and call it good. Cleaver are ideal candidates, for the so called spa treatment. Where they are rehandled and the spine and choil are rounded.

The Hattori cleaver fit and finish is one of the best. The spine needs to be rounded, but other then that fit and finish is very good.

The Hottori KF line strikes a nice balance between thin and medium edged knifes. The cleaver cuts like slicing cleaver, but has some heft, like a chopping cleaver. A lot of the weight is in the handle which pulls back the center of gravity. Cleavers by their nature are nose heavy. Pulling the center of gravity back, makes the cleaver feel more nimble and agile.

The handle is one best features of the line. It is a western, but its rounded in all the right places, which makes it very comfortable.

The VG-10 is easy to sharpen, and holds the edge.

Other top stainless cleavers, are the Gesshin Ginga, Mizuno, and Tadatsuna. The Gesshin Ginga is reported to have nice fit and finish. I've got a Mizuno and Tadatsuna in carbon. Their fit and finish was quite rough. The owners of the Mizuno and Tadatsuna have been positive about their performance. If I were to pick up another cleaver, it would probably be the Mizuno. I've heard enough good things about it, to make me curious.

Jay
 

VitaminD

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Welcome to the forum.

As you noted, the Hattori is a large knife. Are you comfortable using a knife that big? It's not unusual to see a person who has bought four or five gyutos, try a different blade type. Often times it will be a cleaver. Most of the time, they can't put the cleaver down fast enough. Even people who prefer small cleavers, do not care for the larger ones. They are different beasts, from what most are used to. Because of this, the common advice on the forum has been to try a full size cleaver, like the Suien, before getting a more expensive one.

Full size cleavers tend to be rough, when it comes to fit and finish. After grinding such as large blade, it seems like most manufacturers, slap on a handle and call it good. Cleaver are ideal candidates, for the so called spa treatment. Where they are rehandled and the spine and choil are rounded.

The Hattori cleaver fit and finish is one of the best. The spine needs to be rounded, but other then that fit and finish is very good.

The Hottori KF line strikes a nice balance between thin and medium edged knifes. The cleaver cuts like slicing cleaver, but has some heft, like a chopping cleaver. A lot of the weight is in the handle which pulls back the center of gravity. Cleavers by their nature are nose heavy. Pulling the center of gravity back, makes the cleaver feel more nimble and agile.

The handle is one best features of the line. It is a western, but its rounded in all the right places, which makes it very comfortable.

The VG-10 is easy to sharpen, and holds the edge.

Other top stainless cleavers, are the Gesshin Ginga, Mizuno, and Tadatsuna. The Gesshin Ginga is reported to have nice fit and finish. I've got a Mizuno and Tadatsuna in carbon. Their fit and finish was quite rough. The owners of the Mizuno and Tadatsuna have been positive about their performance. If I were to pick up another cleaver, it would probably be the Mizuno. I've heard enough good things about it, to make me curious.

Jay

Thanks for the info...I am looking in to the weight issue, at first I didn't think it was an issue but then picked up a cheap Ikea cleaver at a friends house to try and it was 425g. It felt heavy but I think part of the issue of his cleaver was it wasn't balanced right. But nonetheless I think I will try try a cleaver that is a bit lighter. Initially I wanted the all in one Hattori cleaver since it was able to chop chicken bone but now I think I will have to get a cck for bones and a nice light cleaver for veg. I am still very much wanting a VG10 veg cleaver. I just wish there were more steel options in cleavers by the major manufacturer like there are in pocket knives, s30v, cpm156, s90v, etc maybe I am just asking for too much! Most of the lighter cleavers are cladded with a vg10 core or just give one one JCK shot.
 

Keith Sinclair

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Have a VG-10 core Tojiro. Have owned carbon cleavers in the past, first stainless I have really liked. Tojiro's have good grinds and balance. Yes use the CCK heavy for the bones, the carbon gets razor sharp, great for cutting through chicken bones.
 

Pensacola Tiger

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Thanks for the info...I am looking in to the weight issue, at first I didn't think it was an issue but then picked up a cheap Ikea cleaver at a friends house to try and it was 425g. It felt heavy but I think part of the issue of his cleaver was it wasn't balanced right. But nonetheless I think I will try try a cleaver that is a bit lighter. Initially I wanted the all in one Hattori cleaver since it was able to chop chicken bone but now I think I will have to get a cck for bones and a nice light cleaver for veg. I am still very much wanting a VG10 veg cleaver. I just wish there were more steel options in cleavers by the major manufacturer like there are in pocket knives, s30v, cpm156, s90v, etc maybe I am just asking for too much! Most of the lighter cleavers are cladded with a vg10 core or just give one one JCK shot.
Cleavers are supposed to be heavy - the weight does the work.

You'll find lots of good information in this thread by Andy777, the undisputed "cleaver guy": http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/s...course-on-why-I-love-Chinese-Cleavers-re-post
 

jaybett

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After trying out a bunch of knives, the cleaver is my chef knife. As much as I like them, I am hesitant to recommend them, especially the full size ones that are 220 mm x 110 mm and larger. It takes time to learn how to use a knife with that big and heavy. Which means a person needs a good reason to motivate them through the learning process. My family is constantly getting together, to celebrate something. Usually I was stuck in a small space, with a lot of vegetables to prep. Keith has mentioned, working banquet halls at hotels, where he was under pressure to prep huge amounts of food. Nothing chops as efficiently as a cleaver.

I'd strongly suggest that you look at the reasons why you want a cleaver. Your working in a small space, kids are running around, you like to cook for large groups. You might find that other knife styles, might be a better choice for you and your situation.

Cleavers are often made with virgin steel. Not sure what that means. It becomes more of what trait a person is looking for in a knife. The Mizuno has very good edge retention. The Hattori is a good compromise between a thin cleaver and a medium edge cleaver. The steel sharpens easily, and holds the edge for a good long time. Not as long as the Mizuno, but still very good. The Tadatsuna has a very thin blade, even thinner then some gyutos. The company that makes Geshin Ginga for Japanese knife imports, will take custom orders.

Jay
 
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