Quantcast

Haven't gone beyond 1k grit in a while

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

Boondocker

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 17, 2014
Messages
229
Reaction score
334
I used to have a naninwa as progression, but slimmed down my stones and currently just own a chosera 1k (I'm pretty sure? It's been ages) and my 5k superstore. Is it worth going up to the 5k for my yanagi and deba that I'm using for sukibiki mostly
 

Tristan

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2011
Messages
625
Reaction score
134
So that was me for years. After the initial rush to get stones, stops compounds etc, I just focused on good sharpening habits and stopped at 1k. Sometimes followed by the JNS ‘red aoto’

recently wanted to get back into it and was surprised how much refinement it added to the edge to add a finish on a finer grit stone in the 5-8k range.

Doesn’t last too long vs the 1000 edge (Which goes for miles) mind you, but it makes me smile.
 

Boondocker

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 17, 2014
Messages
229
Reaction score
334
So that was me for years. After the initial rush to get stones, stops compounds etc, I just focused on good sharpening habits and stopped at 1k. Sometimes followed by the JNS ‘red aoto’

recently wanted to get back into it and was surprised how much refinement it added to the edge to add a finish on a finer grit stone in the 5-8k range.

Doesn’t last too long vs the 1000 edge (Which goes for miles) mind you, but it makes me smile.
Yeah when I was line cooking I'd take my gyuto to 5k then have to touch it up at 1k before service. Seemed inefficient so I just stopped at 1k. Will have to give the 5k a shot on my knives and see if I notice a difference
 

lemeneid

TFTFTFTFTF
Joined
Mar 31, 2018
Messages
1,092
Reaction score
1,172
Location
SG
1k will be good for most use cases, but imo it feels like a lot of wasted metal. Now I just focus on sharpening on as high grit as possible to get it sharp so as not to waste metal.

Obviously pro chefs have different applications, but for home cooks, high grit as possible to maintain sharpness works most of the time.
 

GoodMagic

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 21, 2018
Messages
141
Reaction score
77
Location
Westbound
I do the same. Sharpen 1k refine 5k then maintain at 5k. Just works for me and most of my knives.
 

esoo

Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2018
Messages
875
Reaction score
970
Location
Canada, eh?
I recently sold off a bunch of my stones to just focus on the basics. Now I have Shapton 1K Pro and 6K Glass.
 

Doffen

Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2019
Messages
18
Reaction score
11
Location
Norway
This opens an old discussion. High grit stones are more demanding in terms of precision, consistency, pressure and so on. It's not exactly the refinement itself that's the problem.
This is really true. For me it depends on the knife. I have a Vic butcher that I don't like high grit. Best stone I have for this is Chosera 800. Other Vic's are no problem to take higher. It looks like the hardening is a little bit different on this knife. Too soft for high grit, maybe.
 

daveb

Staff member
Administrator
Global Moderators
Joined
Mar 12, 2012
Messages
11,084
Reaction score
2,642
At work I like the results of SP1K followed by SP2K. Used to use the Gesshin 1/6K combo but the Shapton gets me where I want to be quicker. I do keep a SP5K at work if I want to use it.

At home I've got a rock garden and can play with different combinations of stones.
 

dafox

Supporting Member
Joined
May 27, 2017
Messages
1,466
Reaction score
467
Location
Colorado
At work I like the results of SP1K followed by SP2K. Used to use the Gesshin 1/6K combo but the Shapton gets me where I want to be quicker. I do keep a SP5K at work if I want to use it.

At home I've got a rock garden and can play with different combinations of stones.
What are your work knives?
 

daveb

Staff member
Administrator
Global Moderators
Joined
Mar 12, 2012
Messages
11,084
Reaction score
2,642
"House" knives are Wustie Pro. My own vary from Kono to Gengetsu to Tillman and others. Every knife I own has been to work at least once.
 

Helmore

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2020
Messages
95
Reaction score
52
Location
Netherlands
I don't (yet) have anything higher than 1k, but from what I read here on the forum most of you seem not to go higher than a 5000-grit whetstone. Many even prefer 3000 or 4000 and some stop even lower than that.
That made me curious on the thinking behind Shaptons Glass stone sets. They're available in 500/2000/8000, 1000/3000/8000 or 500/2000/16000 grit sets. Naniwa on the other hand has a much more reasonable set for their Pro stones in 400/1000/3000 grit. Is that a difference in philosophy or something? What's Shapton's thinking here? Would you, if you had one of the Shapton Glass sets, see yourself use the 8000 grit stone much?
Buying a set like that seems convenient and you often end up getting a good deal as well. I just don't really see the point in getting an 8000 grit stone for regular home kitchen use. As I said, Naniwa's 400/1000/3000 set seems much more reasonable and I don't understand why Shapton doesn't do a 320/1000/4000 set or something.

P.S. Maybe I could've started a new thread for this topic, but I only realized that now.
 

LucasFur

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
908
Reaction score
256
Location
Toronto, On
maybe for edges ... as soon as it needs thinning ... youll want to polish it higher than 1k .... 1k still has food "grip" 3-5k is my favorite edge/ polish for performance.
 

Rotem Shoshani

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2020
Messages
70
Reaction score
94
Location
Israel
maybe for edges ... as soon as it needs thinning ... youll want to polish it higher than 1k .... 1k still has food "grip" 3-5k is my favorite edge/ polish for performance.
Are you talking about food release?
I was under the impression higher grits tend to be stickier..?
 

Ruso

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2013
Messages
1,636
Reaction score
251
maybe for edges ... as soon as it needs thinning ... youll want to polish it higher than 1k .... 1k still has food "grip" 3-5k is my favorite edge/ polish for performance.
When thinning I find sandpaper to be my best friend to refinish the blade, much faster than stones.

@Helmore higher grits are usually meant for razors and such, also for bragging rights and mirror bevels for this cool photoshoot of your foldie.
And of coruse you can finish your kitchen knife on any grit you want. May be, for you personlly, 15K will be the sweet spot. You will never know until you try.
 

LucasFur

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2016
Messages
908
Reaction score
256
Location
Toronto, On
Are you talking about food release?
I was under the impression higher grits tend to be stickier..?
When thinning I find sandpaper to be my best friend to refinish the blade, much faster than stones.

@Helmore higher grits are usually meant for razors and such, also for bragging rights and mirror bevels for this cool photoshoot of your foldie.
And of coruse you can finish your kitchen knife on any grit you want. May be, for you personlly, 15K will be the sweet spot. You will never know until you try.
There is a balance between stickier and too suction(y)
I FEEEEL, that 1k still has that "new Damascus" Grip on food.
I feeeeel , that 3-5k has the most slippage without being suction(y) and making the food feel like rubber.
I feeeel, sandpaper to leave a good looking finish, but a bad feeling finish when cutting food. it looks great, but i notice i prefer the knife-finish-performance off the stones .... These ideas might just be in my head, but i know all three are in there pretty good. 🤣

Ive taken my blades up to 30k+ .. Fully shaved my face with a 210mm Denka Gyuto, a 240 takeda Gyuto, a 150 takamura petty , 150 masakage nakiri mizu, 175 Masakage bunka yuki , .... really i could sharpen anything to the point where im confortable to shave my face .... if 15k is where its at for you, all the power to you my friend.
 
Top