Help for selecting a nakiri -

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iamromain

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Hello people,

Xmas is coming and I'd like to preempt bad gift ideas by suggesting a new toy.
The next type of knife I'd like to try is a nakiri. Cooking mostly veggies these days, it seems like an interesting option. I'm also curious about their shape overall. I'm a home cook now, after spending a year in a pro kitchen.
I aim for under 180-200€ knife as it is for home purposes and that I've never tried this kind of knife before.

I'm in Europe so obviously less offers, but I've tried to do some research before making a selection that I hope isn't too trash. The selection is also based on my design tastes so I may have skipped some slightly better options just because of how they looked.
Here it is:
Hitohira TD Blue #2 Stainless Clad Kurouchi Nakiri 165mm
Hitohira Futana S3 Migaki Nakiri 165mm
OKEYA GIN3 Tsuchime Nakiri 165mm
Shiro Kamo Carbon damascus Ao2 165mm
Shigeki Tanaka Nakiri 165mm Silver #3 Nashiji

If you have any clear winner, or if everything is garbage, please let me know. Taking any recos or more suggestions if any cross your minds.

PS: I think I would have fall for the Shigeki Tanaka Blue Steel No.2 Damascus Nakiri if it was still available somewhere.

Thanks!
 

AT5760

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I’d go with the S. Tanaka out of those, I’ve heard good things hear about his Ginsan knives.
 

mr_pink

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Hi,
I subscribed to this thread because I'm looking for exactly the same. Thank you Romain for the list, I didn't know about all these shops. I was also looking at this one Kaeru Kurouchi Nakiri 165mm Sorry, I know this is not the answer to your questions, but I'd also welcome some more opinions. Thanks!
 

iamromain

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Hey! Yes it seems like it's a great option.
Might go for this one.

If anyone has another pov / advice, lmk!
 

Benuser

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I have no suggestions in mind, just one warning. Damascus doesn't contribute in any way to a knife's performance. In fact, often they are thicker than one would like.
A serious problem with Damascus is in maintenance. If you sharpen and want to preserve a blade's geometry, you will have to start behind the edge. The reason is, the new edge will move to a slightly thicker part of the blade. This sharpening, together with the stone's mud, will cause scratches. No big deal with other knives, as you can easily remove them with finer abrasives — or in the case of carbon steel, splendidly ignore them, as they will get covered by a layer of patina. With Damascus blades though, you will need to work the entire face with different grades of sandpaper, and finally an aggressive etching agent to restore the contrast. That's really a lot of work for a simple sharpening. Damascus knives may look gorgeous. As long as you don't use them.
 

iamromain

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Thanks Benuser for this explanation. Will def keep in mind now and for the next ones.

Hi,
I subscribed to this thread because I'm looking for exactly the same. Thank you Romain for the list, I didn't know about all these shops. I was also looking at this one Kaeru Kurouchi Nakiri 165mm Sorry, I know this is not the answer to your questions, but I'd also welcome some more opinions. Thanks!
If this post can help more than 1 people (me) then it's even better.
Re: the kaeru nakiri, I love the very straight shape of the blade, like a perfect rectangle. I'm just not into the handle. JNS seems to be a top, top tier source and shop so I don't know if you could make a mistake by ordering from them.
 
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Welcome to the rectangle gang!!! I find myself grabbing one of my Nakiri's at home as the bulk of what I cook is plant based and I am rarely cooking for more than 2. Great, fun, and surprisingly versatile knives - I've sliced small servings of boneless meats with them frequently.

I agree with the above that out of the options originally listed, I'd go with the Shigeki Tananka. That Kaeru also looks to have awesome specs, and would probably be my choice given the option though. Keep in mind that handles are easily changed down the line and that JNS may even have other handle options to be installed upon request.
 

mr_pink

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Would the Shigeki Tananka be easy to sharpen for a beginner? It's no Damascus but won't I damage the pear skin finish?
 
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The reality with any knife is that the original finish will have to be altered over time to maintain performance through thinning. Looking at the S Tananka, you wouldn’t really hit the nashiji as it has a soft “wide-bevel” already established that you can follow during thinning.

I, personally, think kurouchi wide bevel iron clad carbon is the easiest to refinish and maintain over time. A decent stone finish looks better to me than most factory finishes and patina quickly covers up minor inconsistencies.

Important to remember these are tools not jewels. For me, part of the beauty of a handmade knife is watching it change over time through use and care.
 

mr_pink

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Thanks for all the suggestions. In the end I went with Shigeki Tanaka for practical reasons (it was on sale and free shipping). It should arrive in the next days, looking forward to it, it will be my second japanese knife after the deba.
 

iamromain

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Another thing is I’d consider a 180 vs a 165. I think it’s just a bit more useful of a size for nakiri. Still plenty easy to use and less cumbersome than a gyuto in cramped spaces.
I thought about it. I have a 150 petty, a 180 santoku and a 240 gyuto. I felt like 165 nakiri would complete it nicely. Especially knowing that the 2 home kitchens I cook at are quite small.

If you can up your budget a bit, Watanabe Pro. It’s amazing. After much research, KKF led me to it, and I was not disappointed.
It was definitely everywhere in my research, and I would have 100% go for this one if I was still in a pro kitchen. I took something cheaper, more in my tastes and easily available as I went for the S Tanaka.

Also re: changing handle. I have a friend who just started his knifemaking adventure and we'll train a bit before doing it on fine knives.

Thanks everyone for yall inputs, definitely great and appreciated! Great community.
 

Karl Dial

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I recently purchased a Mazaki Migaki W2 180mm nakiri from SKS. Very reactive but more than a workhorse. Extremely beefy in the spine but tapers very nicely. Love Mazaki's profiles. He has received some positive attention on this recently. My first reactive knife so I am still getting used to onions. Cooked chicken is much better at building a nice patina.

Also, my newest knife is a Shigeki Tanaka Nashiji Ginsan 240mm gyuto from K&S. Really like it.
 
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tim huang

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Hello people,

Xmas is coming and I'd like to preempt bad gift ideas by suggesting a new toy.
The next type of knife I'd like to try is a nakiri. Cooking mostly veggies these days, it seems like an interesting option. I'm also curious about their shape overall. I'm a home cook now, after spending a year in a pro kitchen.
I aim for under 180-200€ knife as it is for home purposes and that I've never tried this kind of knife before.

I'm in Europe so obviously less offers, but I've tried to do some research before making a selection that I hope isn't too trash. The selection is also based on my design tastes so I may have skipped some slightly better options just because of how they looked.
Here it is:
Hitohira TD Blue #2 Stainless Clad Kurouchi Nakiri 165mm
Hitohira Futana S3 Migaki Nakiri 165mm
OKEYA GIN3 Tsuchime Nakiri 165mm
Shiro Kamo Carbon damascus Ao2 165mm
Shigeki Tanaka Nakiri 165mm Silver #3 Nashiji

If you have any clear winner, or if everything is garbage, please let me know. Taking any recos or more suggestions if any cross your minds.

PS: I think I would have fall for the Shigeki Tanaka Blue Steel No.2 Damascus Nakiri if it was still available somewhere.

Thanks!
I would recommend you to find this directly to their JP website or IG, tadokoro (まことシリーズ | 土佐包丁工房田所刃物). i have one of his Nakiri and it performs so well.
 

Mrchainsaw

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In choosing a nakiri, what are pros and cons of straight edge (with slight curve at tip) vs a more curved cutting edge? I feel like the curved nakiri is more like western chef knife and therefor defeats the purpose of the nakiri. Here are examples of what I mean. Thoughts?
 

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tim huang

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In choosing a nakiri, what are pros and cons of straight edge (with slight curve at tip) vs a more curved cutting edge? I feel like the curved nakiri is more like western chef knife and therefor defeats the purpose of the nakiri. Here are examples of what I mean. Thoughts?
it would be related to your knife skill. a straight edge is better for some specific knife skills. such as the photo below.
1640000799092.png
 

tim huang

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Can you explain further? Am I wrong to think a curved nakiri is same as chef knife?
a curved nakiri is not equal to chef knife. the tip of the chef knife (or Gyuto) can do some....fine work. overall nakiri is not a multipurpose knife compared chef knife. you would find the major difference in cutting a larger proportion of meat.
 

Mrchainsaw

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a curved nakiri is not equal to chef knife. the tip of the chef knife (or Gyuto) can do some....fine work. overall nakiri is not a multipurpose knife compared chef knife. you would find the major difference in cutting a larger proportion of meat.
No I understand that. I guess my question is poorly worded. It seems to me a curved nakiri isn’t going to behave differently in regards to board contact than a chef knife meaning the curved nakiri would not give you the advantage over a chef knife a nakiri would typically give. Am I correct? I understand chef knife versatility and tip work etc.
 

Mrchainsaw

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@marc4pt0 has a pretty nice nakiri collection

Really I think they can be quite nice in a lot of ways. Easy to thin, easy to sharpen. For me the thinner the better on this. Also square profile. If you're going to be a bear, be a grizzly
Square where the entire length of the blade rests on the board right? That’s my thought. Why are some nakiri made with more resembling of a curve like belly of chef knife?
 

captaincaed

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sometimes they're gyuto that break during heat treat or straightening. Sometimes it's truly stylistic.

A nakiri will usually have a very subtle belly, I think that's preferable to ruler straight.
 
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Mrchainsaw

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Often they're gyuto that break during heat treat or straightening. Sometimes it's truly stylistic.

A nakiri will usually have a very subtle belly, I think that's preferable to ruler straight.
I’m more confused than ever. LOL let’s do it this way. Which of the two look most useful? One is more straight and taller the other shorter more curved.
 

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