Help! I need a mortar and pestle

Discussion in 'Whats Cooking? Food, Drink, & Gear' started by boomchakabowwow, Jul 8, 2018.

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  1. Jul 8, 2018 #1

    boomchakabowwow

    boomchakabowwow

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    I don’t even know where to start.

    Cast iron, stone, ceramic? I’ve owned some sucky ones that where better at holding down papers in the wind. I want to revisit crushing spices and stuff.

    Thanks. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Jul 8, 2018 #2

    McMan

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  3. Jul 8, 2018 #3

    HRC_64

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    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 24, 2018
  4. Jul 8, 2018 #4

    chinacats

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    Imo you need 2...a small one for spices and a large one for making guac, etc. They should be heavy, deep enough and not too steep.
     
  5. Jul 8, 2018 #5

    boomchakabowwow

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  6. Jul 8, 2018 #6

    Anton

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    Yup
     
  7. Jul 8, 2018 #7

    Paraffin

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    Double yup (see, who needs a "Like" button) :)

    I have a small white porcelain one for grinding small stuff like saffron threads, and a larger rough white porcelain one for large batches of homemade curry spices, thai spices, etc. Don't know the brands, we've had them a long time.

    I've wanted to replace the larger one with a granite version for while. Not that the current one isn't doing the job, I've just always heard that granite is ideal. I haven't seen one I'd want yet, or that's in stock. Cole & Mason makes some nice-looking ones, but the larger size is hard to find, and there is some user feedback about the pestle breaking, because it's shaped with a narrow neck.
     
  8. Jul 8, 2018 #8

    buffhr

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    I just use an Ikea one, cheap and does the job just fine and is "double sided" check it out easier then to explain :D, shallow side for spices deep side for everything else.
     
  9. Jul 10, 2018 #9

    Mucho Bocho

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  10. Jul 11, 2018 #10

    btbyrd

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    I use one of the larger ones (but not the largest one) from Import Thai Food. It's great, and deserves the positive press it's gotten. A shame they're sold out of all but the smallest right now.
     
  11. Jul 11, 2018 #11

    gunswanted

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    Same here. I went to ikea the first time in years and this was a score for me. Mine works great for mojito mint! I think it was 16$
     
  12. Aug 1, 2018 #12

    jackslimpson

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  13. Aug 19, 2018 #13

    Ochazuke

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    Even if you’ve already bought other mortar and pestles, I highly recommend a suribachi. They may not grind as quickly as the western variety in my experience, but they do a marvelous job at flavor extraction.

    I couldn’t tell you the science behind it- it may be purely subjective, but nevertheless I feel like I get more flavor out of suribachi than traditional mortar and pestle.
     
    vlad likes this.
  14. Aug 23, 2018 #14

    Leifer

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    The larger all-stone mortar and pestles.... from the south orient or from Central America do need to be "broken-in" right ?
    Typical method is to grind a couple of batches of raw uncooked rice... to eliminate any "first grind grit".
     
  15. Oct 10, 2018 #15

    boomchakabowwow

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    I finally bought the smaller Cole and Mason.

    I think you all are right; now I need a big one! I think mine is too small for pesto. Maybe in batches I could pull it off.

    Mine is pretty good at bashing spices.
     
  16. Oct 10, 2018 #16

    pleue

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    I'm a big fan of the thai style granite ones (polished, no grit like the central american ones) and a suribashi. If you're processing big batches, the preethi eco plus does a good job on spices/chutneys/etc.
     
  17. Oct 11, 2018 #17

    rstl87

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    I also have the Cole and Mason. Agreed it is great for spices. I have tried making curry paste and pesto in it and it needs to be done in batches but at least it's not too porous so it's quite easy to clean out afterwards.
     
  18. Oct 14, 2018 #18

    DitmasPork

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    Really depends on what you need it for, as well as personal aesthetic preferences—there are quite a range, frame the classic French white marble to the Laotian/Thai clay Kruk. I don't believe there are perfect or bad mortar and pestles, but rather inappropriate ones for specific tasks,

    Here are my mortar and pestles. Of which the most used are the $14, three-decade-old Thai granite (bottom left), great for grinding spices, pulverizing alliums into a paste; also well used is the $11 Japanese ceramic suribachi and surikogi, great for goma-ae, vinaigrette, pesto.

    However, when making larger amounts, or on a deadline, I'll use my Krups coffee grinder, or Vita-Prep 3.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2018
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