Help ID La Trompette, Different Handle & Rivet Style

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by Kato, Aug 14, 2019.

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  1. Aug 14, 2019 #1

    Kato

    Kato

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    Hi, first post...found a box of old kitchen knives and other utensils, the first one I picked up is a La Trompette marked 1878 M. Pouset France. It's 15-1/4" total, aprox. 10-1/4" blade and full tang. There are 5 "rivets in the handle, spaced 2-1-2. I tried searching for the exact style but don't see anything like it. It would be nice to know it's date and value. Also is it worth keeping/sharpening and using it or would that hurt it's value? Thanks
    20190814_103331 (Large).jpg 20190814_103440 (1) (Large).jpg 20190814_103244 (Large).jpg
     
  2. Aug 14, 2019 #2

    stringer

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    They probably aren't rivets but peened pins. It's old. And in wonderful shape and rare. If it were my knife and I wanted to get rid of it I would sell it on eBay auction. If I were bidding on this knife on eBay I would not expect to be able to purchase it for less than $150. But it could go for a lot more than that. It's just a question of finding the right buyer. Somebody else might be able to give you more specifics. La Trompette is a desirable brand and most of the ones I have seen are nogent style with ebony handles. The full tang with pins is something I haven't seen before. Awesome knife. Condition looks great for the age.
     
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  3. Aug 14, 2019 #3

    stringer

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    Can we see a view of the spine from the top? How thick is it and what kind of distal taper?
     
  4. Aug 14, 2019 #4

    kayman67

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    Monetary value is hard to estimate. Auctions are extremely unpredictable stuff. You might get a lot or really not much. This is not very saught after for use, but the brand in this condition, makes it desirable for display. Don't change it.
     
  5. Aug 15, 2019 #5

    Kato

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    Bottom is basically the same....

    20190815_095320 (Large).jpg
     
  6. Aug 15, 2019 #6
  7. Aug 15, 2019 #7

    Kato

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  8. Aug 15, 2019 #8

    stringer

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    How about the spine from handle to tip? Generally these knives are known for having very expertly forged/ground distal taper. That's kind of what I'm looking for. They are also often bent/warped like the one I have below.

    IMG_20190815_121846.jpg
     
  9. Aug 15, 2019 #9

    Kato

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    Sorry for the poor photo, at a certain angle there is a slight warp.

    20190815_155819 (Large).jpg
     
  10. Aug 15, 2019 #10

    stringer

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    It's not a chef knife. Probably a slicer. So that hurts the value. But it's rare and in great condition and straight. It's a really nice piece. If it was a chef knife I would have PM'd you an offer for $400. Auctions are fickle but a lot of people are bidding on Trompettes. They see a lot of action.
     
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  11. Aug 15, 2019 #11

    McMan

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    This one has me stumped.
    I’ve seen/used a bunch of these old Sabs (because they used to be easy to find cheap on the bay). Some early ones are exquisite examples of distal taper—some of the thinnest tips that you’ll see anywhere.

    The handle and bolster is what’s confusing me. That style is more British and American. The usual style for old Sabs is a “nogent” handle (fitted to a rat tail tang which is peened over at the handle butt end).

    This can’t be a re-handle since it is a flat tang.
    I wonder if this was for export to Canada? Five-pin handle knives were common in Canada, and there was a tradition of this handle style in trade knives there too...
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2019
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  12. Aug 16, 2019 #12

    Benuser

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    Curiously I had same idea. The French public expected a virole on a rat tail tang. Full tang only introduced very lately. Have seen pins instead of rivets with Sheffields until the fifties.
    My guess would be it was meant for export — as a butcher's knife.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2019
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  13. Aug 16, 2019 #13

    Dan P.

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    Almost looks like a surgeon's or mortician's knife, though I'd expect either to be more highly finished.
     
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  14. Aug 16, 2019 #14

    Kato

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    Even with the marks and discoloration? It looks like it was cleaned and oiled a long time ago.
     
  15. Aug 16, 2019 #15

    stringer

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    The condition is great for the age. The only thing hurting the value is it is a not a chef knife. Chef knives have a lot higher demand than slicers and butcher knives.
     

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