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Slim278

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Apr 5, 2020
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LOCATION
What country are you in?
USA


KNIFE TYPE
What type of knife are you interested in (e.g., chefs knife, slicer, boning knife, utility knife, bread knife, paring knife, cleaver)?
Something Different To Try
Are you right or left handed?
Right
Are you interested in a Western handle (e.g., classic Wusthof handle) or Japanese handle?

What length of knife (blade) are you interested in (in inches or millimeters)?

Do you require a stainless knife? (Yes or no)
No
What is your absolute maximum budget for your knife?
I Have $475 Siting In PayPal That Needs Spending


KNIFE USE
Do you primarily intend to use this knife at home or a professional environment?
Home
What are the main tasks you primarily intend to use the knife for (e.g., slicing vegetables, chopping vegetables, mincing vegetables, slicing meats, cutting down poultry, breaking poultry bones, filleting fish, trimming meats, etc.)? (Please identify as many tasks as you would like.)

slicing vegetables, chopping vegetables, mincing vegetables, slicing meats, filleting fish, trimming meats

What knife, if any, are you replacing?
Am Not Replacing Any Want To Try Something New
Do you have a particular grip that you primarily use? (Please click on this LINK for the common types of grips.)
Pinch
What cutting motions do you primarily use? (Please click on this LINK for types of cutting motions and identify the two or three most common cutting motions, in order of most used to least used.)
Dice Chop Mince Push/Pull Slice
What improvements do you want from your current knife? If you are not replacing a knife, please identify as many characteristics identified below in parentheses that you would like this knife to have.)

Better aesthetics (e.g., a certain type of finish; layered/Damascus or other pattern of steel; different handle color/pattern/shape/wood; better scratch resistance; better stain resistance)?
I Would Like To Try A Different Knife Style Or Grind Style Than The Knives I Currently Own
Comfort (e.g., lighter/heavier knife; better handle material; better handle shape; rounded spine/choil of the knife; improved balance)?

Ease of Use (e.g., ability to use the knife right out of the box; smoother rock chopping, push cutting, or slicing motion; less wedging; better food release; less reactivity with food; easier to sharpen)?

Edge Retention (i.e., length of time you want the edge to last without sharpening)?



KNIFE MAINTENANCE
Do you use a bamboo, wood, rubber, or synthetic cutting board? (Yes or no.)
Yes
Do you sharpen your own knives? (Yes or no.)
Yes
If not, are you interested in learning how to sharpen your knives? (Yes or no.)

Are you interested in purchasing sharpening products for your knives? (Yes or no.)



SPECIAL REQUESTS/COMMENTS

My current list of kitchen knives:
Anryu gyuto 240 AS
Anryu gyuto 180 B2
Wat Nakiri 180 iron clad W2
Toyoma gyuto 210 Iron Clad
Konosuke gyuto 240 SLD
HSC/// gyuto 240 26c3


I know this does not narrow things down much. I am fairly new to quality kitchen cutlery and I am still learning what I like/dislike. I would like to try something a little different than what I have now. Perhaps different maker or blade shape. Even something single bevel, although I have no experience sharpening single bevel. Please keep in mind, I may end up disliking the knife requiring it to be resold. So, good resale value is a +.

Thank you or your assistance.
 

M1k3

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Deba? Sujihiki? Hankotsu or other butchering knives? A big ole bone cleaver?
 

Slim278

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I have some hatchets that can work as heavy cleavers. I wouldn't mind trying a deba or a sujihiki.
 

MrHiggins

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This, I can see me using.
How would a single bevel like this be for detail work in the hand, like pealing fruit, vs a double bevel.
Although I sold mine, I regret it. It was a very useful knife and was great for in hand peeling and slicing/trimming raw proteins. It is also a beautiful knife and exquisitely made. It's certainly not a knife you need, but if you're looking to try something new, it's really well worth your money.
 

refcast

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joe calton chef knife in 1095. Just ask joe to sharpen the bevel a bit more narrow angle than stock. Awesome steel with great edge retention and toughness; super thin knife. A bit more western of a profile, but not a problem for me coming from japanese profiles. Still has a pointy tip. It's basically a western laser, but surprisingly stiff. Differentially hardened. Patina forms a bit differently than j knives. Its a bit less reactive too. The wood western handles are a good in between in weight between typical heavy micarta handles and light japanese style handles.
 
Last edited:

cotedupy

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Well you absolutely have to get a Chinese vegetable cleaver if you haven't tried one!

An ineffably perfect piece of design.
 

LostHighway

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Perhaps the Shibata Kotetsu 185 Bunka? It is basically a laser, very light and very thin. You don't currently own either a laser or a bunka or anything in R2/SG2. It should be an interesting contrast to you Wat nakiri.
Although I don't use small paring knives/pettys all that regularly it is nice to have so I also agree with the petty suggestion whether single or double bevel.
 

Qapla'

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This, I can see me using.
How would a single bevel like this be for detail work in the hand, like pealing fruit, vs a double bevel.
If single-bevel knives for that task are of interest, then maybe a mukimono might also be something to look at.
 
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