High end frying pan recommendation

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valdim

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As far as i know from this post of @Sdo , he has a positive experience with this Anolon's range.
If looking for nonstick and if available for you check Anolon Nouvelle Copper skillet. I got one and it is very very good.
 

Sdo

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As far as i know from this post of @Sdo , he has a positive experience with this Anolon's range.
This is a very good pan IMHO. It is heavy and solid, very responsive and it surprisingly works quite well searing steaks or cooking crispy bacon. Also very good with fish ( crispy skin guaranteed ). Easiest pan I have ever had cleaning wise. Aesthetically it really is a very good looking piece! Again, just my opinion!

Did you manage to have the Paderno and use it?

Cheers!
 

valdim

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This is a very good pan IMHO. It is heavy and solid, very responsive and it surprisingly works quite well searing steaks or cooking crispy bacon. Also very good with fish ( crispy skin guaranteed ). Easiest pan I have ever had cleaning wise. Aesthetically it really is a very good looking piece! Again, just my opinion!

Did you manage to have the Paderno and use it?

Cheers!
Are you talking about the Nouvelle Copper SS frying pan or about the non-stick from the same series?
Did you manage to have the Paderno and use it?
Not yet...I sent some questions to their CS. I guess it is due to Easter they did not reply yet.
 

Sdo

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My bad, I am talking about the non-stick, no experience with the SS. My apologies.

Yeah, I would say Easter's fault. Usually they are responsive and fast.

Cheers!
 

deskjockey

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Premium cast iron has its place in the world of Skillets and related things like Dutch Ovens IMHO.
 

BazookaJoe

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It seems the addiction to Japanese knives also applies to carbon steel pans. As I already have a 19.5" carbon steel De Buyer pan (which I love). I was online looking for a smaller version, with a handle. I came across a 19.5" pan with a handle from a maker I'd never heard from before, Paderno World Cuisine. Did some research and found good reviews. The price was really low for a pan this size (it was listed as last one so that is typical for Amazon), so I bought it. It came in a destroyed box but luckily the pan was not damaged. Side by side with my De Buyer, they seemed about the same. Thickness was 3mm for the Paderno, 3.25mm for the De Buyer. I did the blueing heat treatment on my outdoor propane burner then 2 oil seasoning treatments at 500 deg on my grill as the pan couldn't fit it the oven. I hope to give it a try cooking soon, then I'll have to decide which giant pan I want to keep!


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Towerguy

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"High end"—besides "high quality/performance"—often equates to "rare" and/or "expensive". I very much doubt that a Finex skillet performs much better than a Lodge one. (The Finex costs about 6-7 times as much.)

But the Finex is an awful lot prettier.

No different from kitchen knives, really. Beyond some point, the extra dollars aren't for extra performance.
I totally agree.
 

tcmx3

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It seems the addiction to Japanese knives also applies to carbon steel pans.
just pans in general lol. Ive now gotten an embarrassing amount, to the point where I started giving some away. my parents have been the primary beneficiaries, getting a smaller Stargazer and some Matfer stuff.

anyway as it stands my two choices are, depending on exactly what you want/need:

1. Demeyere Proline 12.6" - an absolute behemoth of a pan but the performance is real
2. Stargazer 12" - it's the right shape, size and weight, plus the handle is the best of any of the cast iron stuff. also it's half the price of the Demeyere.

if not for the evenness of its heating I would say get the slightly smaller Proline skillet, and maybe I should have, but I gotta say I *really* appreciate having the room. you might as well be cooking on a flat griddle pan you have so much space. this makes it exceptional for frying chicken, making multiple burgers at once, you can even do two ribeyes in the thing, slam them both down cold and you'll still keep temp and get them seared.
 

BazookaJoe

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Very nice blueing. Can you walk me through your process? Thank you
After a good cleaning, see:

High end frying pan recommendation

Don't know if you can do the first heating on a kitchen stove with pans this large and thick. My propane burner is 200000 BTU and it still took about 15 minutes. Plus this pan was way too big for the oven, so I had do the oil seasoning on my grill (2 times).
 

daizee

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Dunno if I posted on this before because Pandemic Time, but I received a large (12") Stargzer Cast Iron last fall and it's very good if you're into cast iron. The interior is properly finished, it's a reasonable weight for it's size, not over thick. My only quibble is the handle is REALLY long. Like uselessly long, so it gets in the way, especially since it has a small far-side handle too. This is correctable, though I haven't modified it. I think it's as good as my vintage Griswold collection, possibly better except for the excessively long handle. (the Gris handles overheat, so they're not perfect either). Tho the Gris stuff is deeply seasoned, and I'm only getting started on adding to the factory Stargazer seasoning.
 

daizee

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A longer handle on a cast iron skillet is something I would like, at least compared to my Lodge options.
Great if you do camp or grill cooking, I bet (I don't). They make a 10" and 12", but I warn you: they're not even in the same ballpark. They're not even playing the same game. You'll be ruined for cast iron. I won't touch Lodge with a 10-foot scraper.
 

MarcelNL

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I recently saw a documentary about a mom and pop factory making carbon steel pans largely by hand with few tools, the pans are being spun, and someone forces the edge around a wooden mold with a big lever...Netherton Foundry,

Did anyone ever use one of their pan?
 

rickbern

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I recently saw a documentary about a mom and pop factory making carbon steel pans largely by hand with few tools, the pans are being spun, and someone forces the edge around a wooden mold with a big lever...Netherton Foundry,

Did anyone ever use one of their pan?
Marcel, here’s another video about spinning pans. These ones are a fair bit more expensive I’m afraid!

 

Jville

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I'm curious what uses make copper worth paying for. My regular All-Clad is plenty responsive over gas and induction, and I don't know that copper would provide much of a real-world advantage there even if it's technically superior. Regular All-Clad also heats evenly enough for my purposes. I do have a few clad copper pieces, but it's mostly because I got a good deal on a quality pan than because I thought they were especially great performers relative to non-copper. I just don't see the point. I can understand shelling out $300 for some enameled cast iron or for a high end donabe or something, but copper frying pans aren't something I can get my head around.
I’m not sure if you have used copper with tin lining, but it is a game changing combo for many things. Admittedly, I snubbed my nose at copper for a long time thinking it was perhaps just a bougie unpractical cooking vessel, until I used it. When it comes to frying I would generally not use it for that application and I don’t think I have ever used it to fry in. I would grab a cast iron or carbon steel, but you could use it to fry and I’m sure it would work wonderfully as long as you don’t let the heat get away from you. But as to your “I’m not sure what uses make copper worth paying for.” The evenness of heat distribution is far worth it IMO for many applications. For example sautéing onions or garlic, you can literally put them in the pan spread them out and go watch tv or prep other items while they cook without having to stir them or move them around in the pan at all. You can’t do that with stainless, cast iron, or carbon steel. There will be hot spots and you have to move them around and watch them. Same if you want to boil milk or cream. Put it in a copper sauce pan crank it on high and pour it when it comes to a boil without stirring or worrying if it will burn on the bottom, making jams and sauces absolute pleasure. I’m sure creamy grits would be a pleasure. And tin is more nonstick and easier to clean than stainless, but you can’t use heavy abrasives like steel wool or even green scrubby to clean it. So depending on how or what you cooked and if you let it sit there and get dried on it can be a pain to clean in that situation.
 

tcmx3

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two general thoughts:

copper may be the best on paper, but I have found the high end of stainless to be close enough that Im glad to never have to polish a copper saucepan again. the responsiveness isnt there but the evenness is and that's enough for me. that said, a copper saucepan is *the* one of copper to buy if you want to go down that path IMO. the responsiveness, evenness, etc. is a real boon for certain things.

and two, the stargazer handles are only long by cast iron standards. compared to most good pans theyre the same or slightly shorter.
 

MarcelNL

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I second the votes for copper, I had a very nice copper sauce pan...but then came induction.....and my best mate now has a perfectly fine copper sauce pan
 

sansho

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for nonstick, i'm very happy with anolon nouvelle copper luxe.

a review: In-Depth Product Review: Anolon Nouvelle Copper Nonstick

the cheapest i've found them is bed bath and beyond. you can get 20% off single item coupons on demand by signing up to their email list (use a new address every time of course):


2 pan set (8.5" and 10"):
Bedding, Bath Towels, Cookware, Fine China, Wedding & GiftRegistry | Bed Bath & Beyond

matching lids if you want them:
Bedding, Bath Towels, Cookware, Fine China, Wedding & GiftRegistry | Bed Bath & Beyond
 
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sansho

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1. Demeyere Proline 12.6" - an absolute behemoth of a pan but the performance is real
i really want a demeyere proline. does anyone have shopping tips? do sales happen anywhere? i'm in the US if that matters.
 

tcmx3

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i really want a demeyere proline. does anyone have shopping tips? do sales happen anywhere? i'm in the US if that matters.
it's possible to get a modest discount on them a few times a year from everything kitchens. I think I got 10 dollars off mine. a tiny discount but whatever, a few dollars is nothing in the long run with a pan like that which will genuinely last a lifetime.
 

deskjockey

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two general thoughts:

copper may be the best on paper, but I have found the high end of stainless to be close enough that Im glad to never have to polish a copper saucepan again. the responsiveness isnt there but the evenness is and that's enough for me. that said, a copper saucepan is *the* one of copper to buy if you want to go down that path IMO. the responsiveness, evenness, etc. is a real boon for certain things.

and two, the stargazer handles are only long by cast iron standards. compared to most good pans theyre the same or slightly shorter.
A good stainless "clad" pan or skillet comes so close to copper it is hard to argue for copper. Generally though, the stainless clad at this level are priced so close to copper that most people won't buy them and they never learn how good they are.

Lagostina ACCADEMIA LAGOFUSION so far based on limited use, has exceeded my expectation and I can't imagine copper would have been better. Just last night I cooked something I have scorched more than once on the bottom and not only did I not scorch the bottom, it was so clean I could have wiped it out with a paper towel!

Demeyere Proline skillets are also top notch in this area.

i really want a demeyere proline. does anyone have shopping tips? do sales happen anywhere? i'm in the US if that matters.
I think COVID craziness has affected pricing a lot in general. Pre-COVID, I found the ~9.5" Proline Skillet/Fry Pan on sale for $100. Today, I don't actively check pricing but, I don't recall seeing one on sale. CutleryandMore is where I believe I got mine.

Today, the 20% off coupon at Bed Bath and Beyond is probably the best you can do as long as it is a restricted item for the coupon.
 

Jville

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A good stainless "clad" pan or skillet comes so close to copper it is hard to argue for copper. Generally though, the stainless clad at this level are priced so close to copper that most people won't buy them and they never learn how good they are.

Lagostina ACCADEMIA LAGOFUSION so far based on limited use, has exceeded my expectation and I can't imagine copper would have been better. Just last night I cooked something I have scorched more than once on the bottom and not only did I not scorch the bottom, it was so clean I could have wiped it out with a paper towel!

Demeyere Proline skillets are also top notch in this area.



I think COVID craziness has affected pricing a lot in general. Pre-COVID, I found the ~9.5" Proline Skillet/Fry Pan on sale for $100. Today, I don't actively check pricing but, I don't recall seeing one on sale. CutleryandMore is where I believe I got mine.

Today, the 20% off coupon at Bed Bath and Beyond is probably the best you can do as long as it is a restricted item for the coupon.
Have you directly compared the Lagostina to a full copper tin lined skillet?
 

deskjockey

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I don't have a thick copper skillet and my only tin lined pan is a ~2qt sauce pan. Most of mine is the 2.5mm thick stainless lined Mauviel line of Sauce Pans.

My tin lined copper sauce pan is at least 3mm thick and a joy to use. It is dead flat even from base to rim as best I can tell without scientific instruments.

I can't say the Lagostina ACCADEMIA LAGOFUSION is that even but, it is a different and larger pan. What I typically do is put it on an undersized burner and simmer stews. The simmer itself is consistent whether looking at the sides or center of the stew.

I say this coming from an uneven electric cooktop with poor temperature control.
 

Luftmensch

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A longer handle on a cast iron skillet is something I would like, at least compared to my Lodge options.
Great if you do camp or grill cooking, I bet (I don't). They make a 10" and 12", but I warn you: they're not even in the same ballpark. They're not even playing the same game. You'll be ruined for cast iron. I won't touch Lodge with a 10-foot scraper.
@daizee, can you expand on that?

I went through a long period of coveting the newer, sexier cast iron. To an extent, i still do. There is no doubt; they have more precise and refined manufacturing.

In Australia there isn't as a huge vintage market. Similarly, boutique cast iron does not have much of a presence either... and the shipping would be astronomical! I was excited when Lodge released their Blacklock line - not necessarily because they were 'better' than any of the other new generation cast iron (they are 'worse'). I was excited because Lodge have a big enough distribution network that it was inevitable Blacklock would be sold in Australia... and it now is.

I eventually handled a Blacklock skillet in a store and was underwhelmed. It was a bit deflating! I know simply inspecting one is a far cry from cooking with it.... But the pan just felt insubstantial compared to the regular lodge offering. Certainly not what I have come to associate with cast iron - a thermal freight train. There is a strange irony there given that part of the attraction of the new generation pans is that they are lighter. But that felt 'wrong' in my hands. Perhaps that is just a case of misaligned expectations?

I have also done an about face on pan smoothness. I probably have a good claim to the (once) smoothest cast iron on KKF. Years ago I polished one of my cast iron skillets to a near mirror (just because I could). The smoother the better? Right? I got frustrated with how poorly the seasoning adhered to the surface. To resolve this, I roughed up the surface with low grit paper. Even then it took a long time to accrue durable seasoning. It does seem like a textured surface helps the seasoning adhere! The best option might be a machined surface (so it is flat) followed by low grit sandblasting for texture.


I am on the edge of buy an Aus-Ion pan. I am semi-interested in a carbon steel pan but don't need one. Aus-Ion looks like a carbon / cast iron hybrid... somewhere in between with regards to thermal mass.
 

deskjockey

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Thinner lighter cast iron has its place in the kitchen IMHO. I don't need a super heavy cast iron skillet for everything I do.

Expectation from the ~$15USD 12" Lodge skillets we get from Walmart and similar places has created an expectation of excessive weight. That excessive weight works wonderfully in an apartment with a weak oven and stovetop assuming you have ~30 minutes or more to preheat it. I have made some awesome steaks on a pathetic stovetop using this method and a bit of butter.

The vintage 'barn' find that is so trendy today are much lighter and much smoother. This lighter weight means they often get warped when people slap a cold skillet down on a burner turned up high or not loaded properly with high heat (i.e. single really cold chicken breast in a 12" skillet on high heat). The smoothness is nice IMHO but, it is a bit of technique thing.

Smooth finished or textured like the cheap Lodge cast iron both work IF you know how to use and maintain them IMHO.
 

tcmx3

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there's a wide spectrum of good thermal masses and finishes. I dont think mirrored is on that, but that's me.

Stargazer and some of the other ones are more than massive enough IMO. But that's also me; I basically think of it like Lodge is just overkill in that respect and there's a lot of room to save weight and not drop under where you need to be to have an effective pan.

I will admit seasoning is not quite as durable on Stargazer as Lodge, but it's still WAY better than Carbon.

Again to my taste Stargazer gets all the details right: it's the right shape, the right weight/thickness, the right texture, the right handle, the right helper handle, and the right lip shape to facilitate pouring. Furthermore, in a world of Mauvial 2.5mm and Demeyere it's a much less expensive way to get a top tier pan.

Vintage cast iron is good but variable and nowadays everyone thinks their unbranded pan is worth as much as a Griswold. Might as well skip the headache and get a modern one IMO.

Stargazer is not the only good nor is it necessarily the best. I like it and I do think it's better than Lodge and I rate it highly myself and think it was well worth what I spent on it.
 

deskjockey

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there's a wide spectrum of good thermal masses and finishes. I dont think mirrored is on that, but that's me.

Stargazer and some of the other ones are more than massive enough IMO. But that's also me; I basically think of it like Lodge is just overkill in that respect and there's a lot of room to save weight and not drop under where you need to be to have an effective pan.

I will admit seasoning is not quite as durable on Stargazer as Lodge, but it's still WAY better than Carbon.

Again to my taste Stargazer gets all the details right: it's the right shape, the right weight/thickness, the right texture, the right handle, the right helper handle, and the right lip shape to facilitate pouring. Furthermore, in a world of Mauvial 2.5mm and Demeyere it's a much less expensive way to get a top tier pan.

Vintage cast iron is good but variable and nowadays everyone thinks their unbranded pan is worth as much as a Griswold. Might as well skip the headache and get a modern one IMO.

Stargazer is not the only good nor is it necessarily the best. I like it and I do think it's better than Lodge and I rate it highly myself and think it was well worth what I spent on it.
👍

An easy way for Lodge to cut the weight and keep the existing qualities would be to thin the sides of the pan similar to Stargazer. Personally, I find the grease spouts to be a bit worthless on the regular mass market Lodge skillets. The Chef's Skillet is a lot better in this regard. I also find the sloped sides a lot easier to work with though, I won't fry chicken in it use other high liquid methods due to "splashing" and this is where the older classic Lodge skillet is had an advantage.

If I were to start all over with Lodge, I would get a Lodge "deep" skillet for frying and similar things and the Chef's skillet for normal eggs, pancakes, burgers, etc.
 
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