High end frying pan recommendation

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I have all proline/atlantis. They are worth it. Making a roux, you can use high heat. When caramelizing onions you can basically ignore them if you have the heat level right. The lids for the straight-sided pans fit the frying pans.

The only challenge is that sometimes it's difficult to get the heat down low enough on gas, but induction will fix that.
 
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I also have the proline series. They are fantastic pans. They are heavier than my Mauviel's but they haven't warped, and they have been more resistant to scratching, and retain heat remarkably well. I've also cooked with All-clad and other lesser quality pans, but the Prolines are the best SS pans I've ever used.
 

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I had an industry 5 24cm rondeau. Nothing special vs any other multi clad cookware. Gave it to a friend that I love, she was thrilled. Bought a proline, I was thrilled with the upgrade. I liked it so much that I also bought the 28cm size too.

If the rondeau had been a stick handled pan, honestly, I would have kept it and lived happily ever after

How’s that for anecdotal evidence?

Edit. I cook on gas
How would you describe the upgrade from the industry to the proline? How was it 'better'?

I'm kinda torn between the multiline / industry (they're the same thickness) and the proline. I know the proline has more thermal mass and it's generally acclaimed as 'the best', but the weight increase is significant enough that I can see it being annoying tossing food around in them (I'm looking at 28 and 32cm versions). I can also see the heat retention actually being more of a hindrance than a help in some instances.
But everytime I consider the multiline I anticipate FOMO. ;)
 

tcmx3

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Every pan is a compromise. Proline stuff is amazing for skillets, but tbh I prefer the lighter, fully clad Industry 5 for saucepans (Atlantis/Proline are fully clad on things like skillets, but not on sauce pans).

The Proline skillet is the single best pan on the market IMO. Ultra even heating, tons of thermal mass, good handles, no rivets. Basically there's nothing not to like about it IMO. A bit pricey but still cheaper than copper these days.
 
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How would you describe the upgrade from the industry to the proline? How was it 'better'?

I'm kinda torn between the multiline / industry (they're the same thickness) and the proline. I know the proline has more thermal mass and it's generally acclaimed as 'the best', but the weight increase is significant enough that I can see it being annoying tossing food around in them (I'm looking at 28 and 32cm versions). I can also see the heat retention actually being more of a hindrance than a help in some instances.
But everytime I consider the multiline I anticipate FOMO. ;)
Multiline is 7 ply ( less thicker than he proline ) and Industry is 5. I have a multiline and it is amazing.
 

Jovidah

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Every pan is a compromise. Proline stuff is amazing for skillets, but tbh I prefer the lighter, fully clad Industry 5 for saucepans (Atlantis/Proline are fully clad on things like skillets, but not on sauce pans).

The Proline skillet is the single best pan on the market IMO. Ultra even heating, tons of thermal mass, good handles, no rivets. Basically there's nothing not to like about it IMO. A bit pricey but still cheaper than copper these days.
Yeah the price of proper copper pans is unbearable at this point; they make Demeyere look like a bargain.
Personally I'm not that bothered with the straight wall stuff. I have some 15 euro pots that cook water absolutely fine. For anything saucey, delicate or requiring more finesse than simply a rolling boil I just go for a few of the fully clad conical sauciers I was lucky enough to get on the cheap. I have a sneaking suspicion I'll eventually find a way to legitimize replacing those with some Atlantis versions, but it's not exactly urgent.
In my perfect kitchen you'd see nothing but conical sauciers in different sizes, frying pans, and maybe one or two enamelled cast iron pots for stewy stuff.
 

Jovidah

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I also have the proline series. They are fantastic pans. They are heavier than my Mauviel's but they haven't warped, and they have been more resistant to scratching, and retain heat remarkably well. I've also cooked with All-clad and other lesser quality pans, but the Prolines are the best SS pans I've ever used.
What makes the proline better for you than those the Mauviel / All-Clad? They're probably pretty good 'surrogates' for Demeyere's thinner lines.
Warping the 4.8mm proline... yeah... I don't really see it happening without a jet engine. :D
Multiline is 7 ply ( less thicker than he proline ) and Industry is 5. I have a multiline and it is amazing.
Yeah I've figured out the technical difference. Multiline is basically bigger pans made out of the 3mm atlantis 7 ply stuff. I doubt it's very different from the Industry in the same thickness. Price difference is also negligible... although I do wonder if the aluminium on the multiline is thinner to accomodate the extra layers within the same thickness?

Also... in general; did the multiline ever leave you wishing you bought a different line? Would you still go for multiline over the proline for example it if price wasn't a factor?
 

deskjockey

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I'm considering caving on some of the Demeyere frying pans... anyone have any experience comparing the different lines? Proline vs Multiline vs Industry? I found all the technical data and differences but almost nothing comparing the lines in actual usage.
Cooking on gas now but want to keep the option open of doing induction in the future.

I really like my Proline skillet. For a stainless option, it works really well for me. It has a lot of thermal mass so, it heats up a little slower than my All-Clad. The All-Clad is good but, I like my Proline a lot more.
 
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What makes the proline better for you than those the Mauviel / All-Clad? They're probably pretty good 'surrogates' for Demeyere's thinner lines.
Warping the 4.8mm proline... yeah... I don't really see it happening without a jet engine. :D

Yeah I've figured out the technical difference. Multiline is basically bigger pans made out of the 3mm atlantis 7 ply stuff. I doubt it's very different from the Industry in the same thickness. Price difference is also negligible... although I do wonder if the aluminium on the multiline is thinner to accomodate the extra layers within the same thickness?

Also... in general; did the multiline ever leave you wishing you bought a different line? Would you still go for multiline over the proline for example it if price wasn't a factor?
I do not know the prices now but I got my proline 28cm frying pan for 139EUR and although I did not try the proline I have never thought about getting the Proline after buying and trying the multiline.
Not sure if there is much of a performance difference but I am very happy with my pan and would buy it again.

It is also very easy to clean. Demeyere are awesome pans.
 

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How would you describe the upgrade from the industry to the proline? How was it 'better'?

I'm kinda torn between the multiline / industry (they're the same thickness) and the proline. I know the proline has more thermal mass and it's generally acclaimed as 'the best', but the weight increase is significant enough that I can see it being annoying tossing food around in them (I'm looking at 28 and 32cm versions). I can also see the heat retention actually being more of a hindrance than a help in some instances.
But everytime I consider the multiline I anticipate FOMO. ;)
I bought the 32 cm Proline on the recommendation of this thread. Loved it so much that I bought the 28 cm as well.

Heat distribution is the best I have used. It does retain a bit of heat but this is manageable with a fairly easy learning curve.

The 28cm and 32cm have helper handles but they are heavy enough to make tossing only for those who don't want to take up a gym membership.

I have never used them but the smaller proline pans don't have a helper handle. The 20cm has a thinner aluminum layer (3mm instead of 4.8mm), so is disproportionately lighter. This probably also affects heat distribution (although I guess there is less distance to distribute) and retention.
 
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The 28cm and 32cm have helper handles but they are heavy enough to make tossing only for those who don't want to take up a gym membership.

I have never used them but the smaller proline pans don't have a helper handle. The 20cm has a thinner aluminum layer (3mm instead of 4.8mm), so is disproportionately lighter. This probably also affects heat distribution (although I guess there is less distance to distribute) and retention.
I do have the 20, 24, 28, and 32. I can flip things in the larger pans with one or sometimes two hands without using the helper handle, but I realize I'm an outlier. The little one we use for breakfast sausages and such. It is much thinner, but it works fine for what it is. Mostly you would choose it over a cheaper one because the lids from the other pots fit it.

IMG_8526.jpg
 
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What makes the proline better for you than those the Mauviel / All-Clad? They're probably pretty good 'surrogates' for Demeyere's thinner lines.
Warping the 4.8mm proline... yeah... I don't really see it happening without a jet engine. :D

Yeah I've figured out the technical difference. Multiline is basically bigger pans made out of the 3mm atlantis 7 ply stuff. I doubt it's very different from the Industry in the same thickness. Price difference is also negligible... although I do wonder if the aluminium on the multiline is thinner to accomodate the extra layers within the same thickness?

Also... in general; did the multiline ever leave you wishing you bought a different line? Would you still go for multiline over the proline for example it if price wasn't a factor?
We cook with a natural gas cooktop and an electric stove. Over time the high heat has warped the thinner pans. They wobble a little bit and the contents often gravitate towards the low spots. The proline cleans up easier and doesn't have any rivets to work around. The handles are great. Everything is well thought out and well executed. The only time I don't use them is when I am cooking with cast iron.
 
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OK, I’m late to the party for this old thread. After installing an induction cooktop I needed some new pans. A couple of members over on the Badger & Blade forum recommended Demeyere Atlantis. So I got one, and then another, and another…

I am now a huge fan of the Demeyere Atlantis/Proline series. They are the best pans I ever had.

The large one with the helper handle is my favorite for omelettes. Lots of real estate for spreading the egg out. The smaller pan is the largest without a helper handle. I like to use it to prep the omelette fillings. (Looks like I over cooked that first omelette.)
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Bacon in the oven is a huge time saver and the rendered fat comes out much cleaner. Before going in the oven I cover it with a piece of parchment to keep the splatter down.
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The Atlantis sauté pan with lid is another favorite workhorse. Lately I’ve been making popcorn in it. It’s much quicker and easier to clean than my Whirley Popper.
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ptolemy

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I'm considering caving on some of the Demeyere frying pans... anyone have any experience comparing the different lines? Proline vs Multiline vs Industry? I found all the technical data and differences but almost nothing comparing the lines in actual usage.
Cooking on gas now but want to keep the option open of doing induction in the future.
I have only used profile and kitchenaid 7ply with copper (made by demeyere) very nice and very heavy. better than all-clad d7, coppercore imo

How would you describe the upgrade from the industry to the proline? How was it 'better'?

I'm kinda torn between the multiline / industry (they're the same thickness) and the proline. I know the proline has more thermal mass and it's generally acclaimed as 'the best', but the weight increase is significant enough that I can see it being annoying tossing food around in them (I'm looking at 28 and 32cm versions). I can also see the heat retention actually being more of a hindrance than a help in some instances.
But everytime I consider the multiline I anticipate FOMO. ;)
i can't imaine tossing anything in my 32cm profile... it's very heavy.
Yeah the price of proper copper pans is unbearable at this point; they make Demeyere look like a bargain.
Personally I'm not that bothered with the straight wall stuff. I have some 15 euro pots that cook water absolutely fine. For anything saucey, delicate or requiring more finesse than simply a rolling boil I just go for a few of the fully clad conical sauciers I was lucky enough to get on the cheap. I have a sneaking suspicion I'll eventually find a way to legitimize replacing those with some Atlantis versions, but it's not exactly urgent.
In my perfect kitchen you'd see nothing but conical sauciers in different sizes, frying pans, and maybe one or two enamelled cast iron pots for stewy stuff.

i think that in the end, as long as you use quality cookware, the rest can be tied to your technique, so if you use d7, coppercore, 5ply demeyere or atlantis, your results should be within 3% with proper cooking / heating techniques. there could be some exceptions on outlier dishes, but for the most part, imo, it's hard to directly compare since every cook is different with different techniques.
 

jjlotti

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The cook and the ingredients are what make the the dish. Daniel Boulud will outcook you with a butter knife and a Family Dollar skillet. That said diversity is key to a good cook. Copper with tin linining, clad stainless, iron, enameled iron,and yes, non stick all have there place in a properly appointed kitchen. My stainless opinions for the op. Demeyere are great all around. I have the 12.5 7ply. For maillard All Clad D5. You can leave it on high heat for 5 minutes with nothing in it and transitions to the oven beautifully. It will not warp. No experience with d7. No copper core skillet experience but have their 2 and 4 quart sauciers which are great. Kitchen Craft 7 ply skillets are the finest quality steel to me. mirror smooth and just will not scratch. Ugly antiquated handles, that aren't good for the oven make little sense, but these pans are a joy for sautéed vegetables etc. What's my main observation? Jeez I'm spoiled and love to cook... 👍
 

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Bacon in the oven is a huge time saver and the rendered fat comes out much cleaner. Before going in the oven I cover it with a piece of parchment to keep the splatter down.

I'm also a huge fan of bacon in the oven. Great tip about the parchment. Is that just their roasting pan that you're using to cook the bacon?
 

jjlotti

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Me too! Just wonder if the parchment on top creates a steam effect inhibiting browning? My way? Parchment liner with wire rack.
 

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I have to pipe in here. Like knives, using the right pan for the job helps you get great results. I like to cook. I like knives, I like good cookware. My EDC pots...Falk copper, Staub, and a smattering of All Clad. Woks...I have 2 Cen brothers hand hammered woks, a Yamada, and a Made In wok. I use them all. I guess my Falk frying pans are high end, but they dont get the most use. In my day to day cooking, good old cast iron and carbon steel gets most of the duty. Over the years I have managed to collect a nice collection of Griswold skillets, and they are daily drivers. I have owned and tried a whole range of carbon steel pans, and the ones that get the most use are 2 by Made In...and some made by Darto in Argentina. The Darto's are not expensive, and are awesome. Eggs are made in a cheap Tramotina non stick frying pan..the only non stick I use. Unless I am making a sauce or braise that is acidic..cast iron or carbon steel rules.
 

sumis

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my 2¢, from owning a few demeyere pans, and used several from different series: industry 5, multiline, proline, etc; no big deal! the difference between these demeyere lines will of course not make or break your cooking results.
personally, for a +28cm skillet, i mostly prefer the lighter of the alternatives, and i rarely use the large skillet with the helper handle.

i like the demeyere stuff a lot, but from industry 5 and above your technique is more of a concern than mass or heat retention, etc.

but yes, your heat source kind of dictates a lot. and a crappy induction range will probably benefit from 'better' pans.

i'm just a home cook, but with friends who cooks for a living, and i grew up with a great chef and around a kitchen. as an adult getting into cooking gear and after spending too much time and money on it, i took a step back and asked myself, what gear are the chefs and cooks that i know and/or admire using to get their results? nowadays, my most used pan is a stainless 26cm sauteuse, 3-ply, costs 50€ at the restaurant supply store. i don't use it because my technique is good (it isn't), but because the pan is as good as anything!

demeyere's silvinox surface is dope though.

.
 

Jovidah

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Which two did you get?
'All of them'. I figured it kinda made sense to splurge since the prices on them are likely to rise soon anyway (they still haven't been adjusted for 'inflation' like almost everything else). Decided to basically go overboard, buy everything on my wishlist so I can basically stop looking at frying pans for the rest of my life.

Went with a 24/28/32 set from the multiline (basically 3mm proline / industry in 5 layers), and a 28 proline. My reasoning is that while the proline is definitly 'the best' for searing meats, most people seem perfectly happy with the lighter models as well, and I found that 3mm stuff is at least adequate from a thermal perspective for most things I do with them. Less mass means more responsive and easier to handle. Hence the lighter models that will be used for most saute and frying duties.

It's a bit of an investment but I figured I'd rather skip all the way to the high end than take all the intermediate steps, and end up buying the high end later on anyway. A lot of the mid-range stuff is still expensive enough that it makes more sense to me to skip it altogether - especially when I found most to be on the rather thin side, or being flawed in one way or another.
 

Jovidah

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Buy once, cry once is my motto for things like this!
Yeah... tho I'm a strong proponent of 'good enoguh is good enoguh', trying to get by with 'bang for the buck' pans has been a bit of a false economy for me. From a thermal perspective I really liked my Ikea Sensuel pans, but 5-10 years later all the handles on the frying pans have started getting ever looser on the rivets, the insides are slowly starting to show pitting (they probably skimped on the steel and put 18/0 on the inside)... my cheap enamelled made in china cast iron started to flake its enamel after 5 years... Really the only exception has been the de Buyer carbone pans.
Didn't really feel like experimenting my way upwards on the priceladder only to eventually end up at the same destination only having wasted even more money.
 

Corradobrit1

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Since moving to Germany and not being able to find reasonably priced Cuisinart Classic French pans I decided to check out some more common French makers. Been super impressed by the DeBuyer SS Affinity range. I have the 24cm frying pan and a 2 liter saucepan so far. I found the larger Cuisinarts warped when heated to high temps for searing, but the DeBuyer has held up well despite a little abuse.
 
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Seem to be reaching for the Demeyere John Pawson 9.5 in. skillet more. Easy to use a spatula with, handle is ergonomic, and is easy to clean. I had my doubts. The top from the 8 qt. stockpot fits.
 

Jovidah

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My initial impressions so far... the multiline (same thickness as industry) and proline are simply different products. It's not that one is really straight up better than the other... they're just different tools.

IMO the proline is awesome for searing meat because of the thickness; it's essentially a stainless cast iron thermal brick. But as a result it's also heavy - a bit too heavy to comfortably toss in 28 cm size - and slow; takes longer to heat and longer to cool down. I kinda wished the 28 cm proline didn't come with the helper handle since it's just adding unnecessary weight for me.

So I actually think for 'all round saute / veggie usage' the multiline is actually the better choice. It's 3 mm (just like the Industry), noticably lighter and more nimble, responds faster and much easier to toss. On my gas stove it's still plenty thick to provide even heat, while easier to handle for all the things that don't require a massive thermal brick.

I'm actually really happy I bought pans from both lines; going from multiline to proline isn't so much an upgrade, I think it's more of a sidegrade.

Only real complaint I have is that the handles are on the small side. For me they're a bit on the thin side, and the corners are still a bit too squarish. Easy to solve with a towel, which I have at hand for my de Buyer anyway, but I'd rather just have a slightly thicker handle.
 
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