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Homemade chicken stock

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sw2geeks

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Roasted a chicken last weekend and made some stock from the leftovers. I like fixing mine in my slow cooker.
Just throw the leftovers in the slow cooker with some carrots, celery and onions and fresh stock in the morning.

Here are some pics.

















More pics and recipe here.
 

mr drinky

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beautiful. I want to drink it.

k.
 

tk59

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I just finished making mine this morning! I could have written this post and it would have been perfectly accurate, lol.
 

ecchef

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Looks good! Try straining it through a coffee filter for a more clear stock.
 

apicius9

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Cool, I was thinking about getting a Costco chicken and making a stock from the leftovers later this week. My first thought was pressure cooker but there seems to be a difference of opinions about that. This could be my chance to use my slow cooker which has been sitting unopened on the top of my kitchen cabinet for a year or so... :)

Stefan
 

Craig

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I did the same thing with a rabbit I did a few months ago. The only real difference is I put a bunch of mushrooms in when making the stock, along with the organs from the rabbit. Once I was done I put all the stuff I strained of the stock in the food processor with a little stock, butter, brandy and some herbs and made a paté.

That and it was way grosser because I had the head and everything. :lol2:
 

cnochef

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Great idea doing it in your slow cooker using cheesecloth!

Another good hint for maximum flavor and color extraction is to roast your veggies in the oven first, leaving the onion skins on.
 

mr drinky

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I like the idea of using a slow cooker. I also saw in a magazine recently of someone using a pressure cooker to speed things up. That would be interesting to try.

k.
 

sw2geeks

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I like the idea of using a slow cooker. I also saw in a magazine recently of someone using a pressure cooker to speed things up. That would be interesting to try.

k.
I have found the slow cooker method to be the easiest, no fuss way to make stock. After dinner I throw the leftover roast chicken into my slow cooker with some carrots, onions and celery (plus anything else I have laying around), then top of with water. When I get up in the morning the stock is done. If you used the cheesecloth to line the insert then even the cleanup is easy.
 

ajhuff

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Do you have to worry about a boil in the crock pot? I always thought for stocks you wanted just barely a simmer. My crock pot only has low and high and low still seems to bring a soup to boil.

-AJ
 

sw2geeks

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Do you have to worry about a boil in the crock pot? I always thought for stocks you wanted just barely a simmer. My crock pot only has low and high and low still seems to bring a soup to boil.

-AJ
My low does not boil on my stock pot. There also is no foam on top to skim like traditional stock.
 

rahimlee54

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I'll try it this weekend. Looks easier than a stockpot to transfer.
 

CalleNAK

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I made a killer Duck Stock over christmas. Bought a bunch of ducks to make duck tamales, rendered the lard and made the stock for the masa. They came out amazing and still have lots of lard and stock left.
 

AnxiousCowboy

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Duck stock is one plentiful ingredient in my kitchen, goes in as white or dark stock, jus, then bigarade sauce, mixed with remouillage for braises, etc I love the stuff. If you're doing a straight white stock, i love to add the herbs and spices just in the last ~30, no longer, heavy on the parsley.
 

ejd53

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Very interesting article! I do stock with some frequency, and may look into this further.
Very interesting, however I have to disagree with the author and agree with his interns. He is comparing apples to oranges when he dilutes the conventionally made stock so that the volumes are equal. I am unsure as to why he thinks that the only way to accurately compare the two methods is to end up with the same amount of stock, when it is the taste he is trying to evaluate. If he wants to do that, he should dilute the pressure cooker stock by the same percentage and then compare.
 

Craig

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Anyone have a recipe for lamb stock? I've got some bones just begging to be used.
 

Jim

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Nice job on the stock,I will try that. I save my onion skins for my Chix stock- adds a nice yellow color.
 

bieniek

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1.5KG scrag end, breast or lower best end of lamb, skin and fat removed, cut into pieces

150 G carrots, cut into rounds

100G onions, coarsly chopped

250ml dry white wine

4 tomatoes, peeled. deseeded and chopped

2 garlic cloves

1 bouquet garni including 2 sprigs of tarragon and celery stalk

6 white peppercorns

Preheat oven to 220 degrees C. Put the pieces of lamb on the roasting tray and brown in the hot oven, turning them from time to time with a slotted spoon. [old fart even tells you what kinda spoon you should use].

When the lamb has coloured, add the carrots and onions, mix togethr and cook for another 5 minutes. Still using the slotted spoon, transfer all the content of the roasting pan to a large saucepan or casserole.

Pour off the fat from the tray, deglaze with the white wine and reduce by half. Pour the reduced wine into the saucepan with lamb, add 2.5L cold water and bring to boil over high heat.

As soon as the liquid boils, reduce the heat so that the surface is barely trembling.

Simmer for ten minutes, then skim the surface and add all the other ingredients.

Simmer uncovered, for 1.5 hours. Skimming the surface as necessary.

Strain the stock through fine-mesh conical sieve into a bowl and cool ass quickly ass possible
:D
 

Craig

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Thanks.

I've never been a fan of pouring a third of a bottle of wine into a stock. I mean I only do this to not be wasteful, but tossing that much wine in seems more wasteful to me. Obvious exceptions for when I have cheap wine kicking around.
 

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