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Honyaki?

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LucasFur

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That said, I got a great long lasting edge from 2/3. It's a shame, one wouldn't hold an edge, but had a damn near perfect work pony grind.
Interesting ... I thought a component of honyaki was that the visible hamon, shows how well the HT was done. (And the polishing there after brings it out)

I’ve used and thinned a couple Honyaki ... I usually think why do I put myself through this every time I get to that stage. But then using, and knowing it’s A pretty special blade makes it more worth it. Are you really going to work on a cheap blade to make it beautiful? Not really, and as you work on it more, it becomes an extension of your arm more.
 

adam92

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When I use my Mizu Honyaki white one Yanagiba to cutting sashimi & nigiri neta, I can easily tell the different compare with my Blue two, Blue one Yanagiba. I don't know how to explain, but it really does. also edge retention, is way better. I cut roughly 400-600 sashimi per day, maybe 30 piece nigiri with 飾り(precious cut) to cut the fibre, one piece nigiri maybe 10-15 times of cutting.

White one Honyaki keep the sharpness 80% after doing these job, while other maybe 50% or less sharpness in my experience.

Sharpening Honyaki need to have good whetstone, otherwise take forever to sharpen,don't ask me why😭😭😭
 

JayS20

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Seriously I don't get you guys comparing SanMai with Honyaki blades and also with different steels and different makers. To make a quality assessment one would need to compare a Monosteel with a Honyaki from the same steel and maker to get any proper conclusions.
 

lemeneid

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Seriously I don't get you guys comparing SanMai with Honyaki blades and also with different steels and different makers. To make a quality assessment one would need to compare a Monosteel with a Honyaki from the same steel and maker to get any proper conclusions.
Pretty much this.

The only knives forged and sharpened by the same person/company are Ashi, Hiromoto and Watanabe/Toyama to take away all other variables. Unfortunately, getting any of them for comparison would be out of the question for most people.
 

HSC /// Knives

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Interesting ... I thought a component of honyaki was that the visible hamon, shows how well the HT was done. (And
I don’t think a visible hamon is any indication of how well the heat treat is done. There are too many variables in heat treating. A wide band of heat treating parameters can give you a visible hamon.

Harbeer
 

HSC /// Knives

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Question that’s been on my mind.

Is the term honyski being too loosely applied by western makers and forum
Members?

Specifically isn’t a minimum requirement for the term? that the blade is forged by the maker?
 
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RDalman

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Question that’s been on my mind.

Is the term honyski being too loosely applied by western makers and forum
Members?

Specifically isn’t a minimum requirement for the term? that the blade is forged by the maker?
Absolutely! Apply new rules? No knife can be called honyaki on the forums unless accompanied by handforging video (traditional settings only) and referenced unique kanji 😀
 
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Barmoley

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There were claims at some earlier discussions that only Japanese made knives can be called honyaki. To me, call it what you want. It is what it is a mono steel differentially heat treated knife. Forged or not, Japanese made or not, same maker, etc.... As long as we know what we are talking about it is all good. The more specific you make the definition the more precise and less useful it becomes as then you need definitions for the variants too. Functionally there is no difference if it was made in Japan or somewhere else or if it was forged or not, so I'd rather definition followed function.
 
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