How are you coping? What are you doing

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TheNewMexican

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Bought a pup that cost 2000 euros, he is joining our pack day after tomorrow.

He's a pedigreed Miniature Bull Terrier and both of his parents are multiple European champions. 8 weeks old in 2 days.
A good looking little fellow for sure! I have my eye on a Leavitt Bulldog but a friend of mine swears that dog intelligence is inversely proportional to how much a person pays for them. Could be...... I've got a Corgi mix I rescued from the shelter for a few dollars and she trains me more than I train her. Ha!
 

podzap

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Rescue a dog please...
We have two rescue dogs (both terriers) who have lived with us for 6.5 years already. Their price was only 450 EURO each (chipped, vaccinated, EU dog passports, etc), but their value and impact on our lives has been priceless. And I'm not ruling out taking another rescue someday but the current ones will probably live for another 4-8 years each. It's still a long time. And they are both dearly loved.

Normally I am not into purebred dogs but c'mon, it's a Bull Terrier :) The most unique dog in the world in terms of personality! Watch some youtube videos and you will see :)
 

podzap

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X2 only snobby ass people *BUY dogs
Rescue dogs are also not free - we paid 450 EUR each for our two rescues. And one of them came to us with parvo, bloody diarrhea that landed his ass in the hospital in less than a week and it cost another 400 EUR to save his life.

Save your judgement for somebody that gives a **** :) Not being hostile, just honest.
 

podzap

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A good looking little fellow for sure! I have my eye on a Leavitt Bulldog but a friend of mine swears that dog intelligence is inversely proportional to how much a person pays for them. Could be...... I've got a Corgi mix I rescued from the shelter for a few dollars and she trains me more than I train her. Ha!
Bulldogs are mainly from mastiff lines. Neither terriers nor mastiffs are known for their superior intelligence, but they're certainly not stupid dogs. And some people rank dog intelligence by their biddability - the willingness to do what you tell them to do. Terriers are stubborn AF and independent thinkers. That doesn't make them stupid, rather gives them the ability to do their work without a person commanding them.
 

labor of love

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Rescue dogs are also not free - we paid 450 EUR each for our two rescues. And one of them came to us with parvo, bloody diarrhea that landed his ass in the hospital in less than a week and it cost another 400 EUR to save his life.

Save your judgement for somebody that gives a **** :) Not being hostile, just honest.
Wow. Both of my guys were $65 each shots neutered included.
 

labor of love

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Me too. All jokes aside-no chips or passports. Didn’t realize pet passports is a thing.
 

podzap

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Me too. All jokes aside-no chips or passports. Didn’t realize pet passports is a thing.
 

labor of love

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Okay. Well sure mine came with papers too. I can understand your costs now.
 

rob

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It’s the same here Australia. Our rescue pup was $700. De-sexed, microchipped and vet checked. We love him, and he has bought the family so much joy.
PS. I owned a bull terrier many years a go, crazy lovable characters.
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Bert2368

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I SHOULD HAVE JUST GOT A DOG BEFORE THEY SHUT DOWN THE SHELTERS. I know from experience how good they are for putting mere human insanity into perpective...

---------

A new word has appeared:

"Doomscrolling"


I, for one, vote for "snuffsurfing" instead. Gotta alliterate. Plus, MINE.
 

YumYumSauce

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Dont think Ill ever purchase a dog. My brother found this guy on the street. No tags or anything. He went to see if he was chipped or if anyone was missing a him. He's been with us since 2010. We also had another dog my sisters co-worker gave away to us.
 

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Bert2368

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It's been 10 days since the last frost. I think it's safe now... Planted the tomatoes and some indoors started sweet corn, starting to plant the peppers. Carrots are up, parsnips just starting to break ground. Cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower all planted.

Today I planted 10 hills with indoor started fiber pots of of my favorite winter squash, "Uncle David's Dakota Desert Squash". I prepared the ground over a month back and also put a dome of chicken wire over each hill to keep any critters from messing with them before they are large enough to survive getting mauled.




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I put these Hills of squash in a long row down the lane North of the rifle range backstop, in between the three Haralson apple trees I planted for the deer to enjoy- Deer like to snack on squash and pumpkins nearly as much as apples, I will get enough squash for myself as well from this row. Tomorrow if the rain holds off, I will plant a couple of rows of corn on either side of the line of apples trees and squash hills to give the deer a nice privacy screened area to snack on the apples and pumpkins. Since the rows of corn will extend directly away from the deer stand, these rows will not really provide any useful cover in that direction. Sorry, deer. Yes, I am an ambush predator.
 

panda

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It's been 10 days since the last frost. I think it's safe now... Planted the tomatoes and some indoors started sweet corn, starting to plant the peppers. Carrots are up, parsnips just starting to break ground. Cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower all planted.

Today I planted 10 hills with indoor started fiber pots of of my favorite winter squash, "Uncle David's Dakota Desert Squash". I prepared the ground over a month back and also put a dome of chicken wire over each hill to keep any critters from messing with them before they are large enough to survive getting mauled.




View attachment 81464

I put these Hills of squash in a long row down the lane North of the rifle range backstop, in between the three Haralson apple trees I planted for the deer to enjoy- Deer like to snack on squash and pumpkins nearly as much as apples, I will get enough squash for myself as well from this row. Tomorrow if the rain holds off, I will plant a couple of rows of corn on either side of the line of apples trees and squash hills to give the deer a nice privacy screened area to snack on the apples and pumpkins. Since the rows of corn will extend directly away from the deer stand, these rows will not really provide any useful cover in that direction. Sorry, deer. Yes, I am an ambush predator.
my fat ass thought this was some sort of underground fire pit for cooking.
 

Bert2368

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my fat ass thought this was some sort of underground fire pit for cooking.
More like a future ingredient acquisition/prep area... As far as I can recall, 17 deer have been invited to dinner within 100 yards or so of that squash mound in the picture. I'm printing the next round of invites, so to speak.

I suppose we COULD try a luau pig out there, but the bears would probably dig it up before we did. I have pictures of 3 bear cubs playing with pumpkins I grew in that area, rolling them around like beach balls. Then their mother showed up and was not pleased to notice me taking pictures of her children. Embarrassing.
 

Michi

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So, the flour crisis is pretty much over. In Australia, it's easy to get hold of almost any kind of flour now, except for some imported specialist flours, such as the ones made by Bob's Red Mill.

But Australia's largest flour mill is still running 24x7. It turns out that Australians have re-discovered the lost art of baking, and are baking loads of their own bread. My guess is that people have finally found out that it takes very little to make a bread at home that absolutely runs rings around the commercial bread they buy at most supermarkets and bakery chains.

This coronavirus thing has done more for cooking and baking skills in two months than all the cooking shows put together have over the past ten years…
 
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Lars

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a lot of people also are getting back in touch with growing and raising their own foods.
That's me - I have been thinking about growing vegetables for a while and finally planted a few different sorts in growbags as well as some herbs.
There is an attachment to my house made from wood and glass that I have basically turned into a greenhouse.
So far I'm harvesting herbs and young courgettes. It has been a great experience and I'm thinking that next year I will devote a piece of the garden to it as well.
 

podzap

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It turns out that Australians have re-discovered the lost art of baking, and are baking loads of their own bread. My guess is that people have finally found out that it takes very little to make a bread at home that absolutely runs rings around the commercial bread they buy at most supermarkets and bakery chains.
I mean you can buy good bread but it costs like 5-6 eur for a loaf. People can't afford that stuff if they are laid off.
 

Michi

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I mean you can buy good bread but it costs like 5-6 eur for a loaf. People can't afford that stuff if they are laid off.
True. But that price range is for artisan bread (AUD 6-8). An 800 g run-of-the-mill supermarket loaf costs AUD 3-4. A 2 kg packet of all-purpose flour costs AUD 5. So, yes, it's cheaper to bake my own bread. But I strongly suspect that people aren't baking their own just to save money. The price difference isn't significant enough to matter, except in extreme cases. I really think this is happening because homemade bread is better by a very wide margin.
 
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