How much polishing is too much?

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Perhaps we don't define polishing in the same way. To me, removing scratches is polishing. Perhaps not "polishing" the extents of single bevel nuts, but mechanically speaking, removing scratches is polishing steel. However, I do agree that 2-3K is a sweet spot to stop and get the crucial results of having removed scratches and restored ability to travel through food seamlessly. Is also a sweet spot for Kasumi.

Edit: I would agree with "blending" which is the usual term for automotive sandpaper for example. For sakes of differentiating from thinning, I consider that any stone that doesn't remove so much steel than refine the scratch pattern is polishing. I would guess that for you, polishing begins when it is done for cosmetic purposes. I guess there's fairly nothing to say against that POV.
 
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jwthaparc

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I spent a couple of hours thinning an iron clad nakiri on a SG220 stone. It ate about half of the stone, and severely dished it. The knife was only thinned 0.2mm 1cm behind the edge and it only lost 4g of weight. Polishing a knife, with fine stones, fine paper, or compounds win't remove any appreciable amount of steel.
Yeah, I always recommend going 120 or lower for serious thinning.
 

inferno

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i do all my bevel flattening on 220 or 120 shaptons. or 240 sigma.
 

Pie

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i do all my bevel flattening on 220 or 120 shaptons. or 240 sigma.
SG220 seems ideal for flattening. Originally bought for thinning, but looks like I might need to get a 120 for serious jobs
 

inferno

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the 120 pros are good too imo. i just leave the slurry on there and they keep on cutting for hours.
i never flatten these, i just use the edge parts when the center gets dished to even it out.

these stones wear so fast so i dont really see any need to flatten them. lets them flatten themselves imo.
 

Pie

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I never flatten either, but mostly because I shredded my atoma on a coarse stone and am now terrified. Got some 80 grit sandpaper and a pretty flat concrete floor when if it starts looking bad tho 😂
 

inferno

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just get some silicon carbide powder and something flat to flatten on. this is about 10-20 times faster than diamondplates.

i have 60, 80, 120, 200something and 400 i think.

but you probably only need the 60 and then maaaaybe a finer one. in a 10:1 ratio. the powder breaks down to finer powder in about a minute when you use it. thats why you dont need the finer ones.
 

jwthaparc

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Yeah i have 60 grit, and 36 grit sic powder I use for my coarse stones. And i just got a 60 grit trueing stone.
 
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