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How to Care For Your Martell Knives

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Dave Martell

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Blade Finish - Carbon
We purposely apply a near mirror level of finish on our carbon Martell knives for a few reasons....

1. A higher polish means less re-activeness which we hope helps the new owner develop a patina while not destroying their food in the process. Too often carbon knives can kill a dish (or three) as the patina is forming and we want our customers to be able to get past this hurdle.

2. If the correct polish is applied to the carbon blade the surface texture becomes slick which helps food to release. Quite often we hear people complain that food sticks to their knives after they bring them to a mirror polish (and we agree this happens) but if you use specific compounds to bring the mirror level just below perfect (sort of a near perfect or light haze) you can get the exact opposite effect where food releases better than normal. This is what we aim for.

3. Nothing is prettier than a mirror polished carbon knife that forms a patina. Take any carbon knife and polish it up and you'll see what I mean between the before and after. In this case we did the polish work so that our customers never have to.


Now you'll notice that I didn't mention out of the box appearance - that's just a nice side effect of the mirror finishing process. The reasons we do this is for what this level of finish provides specifically for function where aesthetics becoming a secondary compliment.



Cleaning - DO NOT put a Martell knife in the dishwasher or soak in the sink! This will ruin any good knife.

As for cleaning or maintaining the look/finish of a carbon Martell knife as it comes to you - I wouldn't. I would instead use the knife and let it develop a patina naturally and enjoy the beauty as it develops over time. Some folks look at patina as ugly or dirty while I view patina as a record of the history of the knife’s use, plus it serves as a natural layer of oxidation that will help to protect the knife from rust formation, so try leaving it in place and see how you feel about.

If you use the knife often you will need to do nothing special - just wash with warm/hot water, immediately dry, and store. If you infrequently use the knife, maybe only once in every few months, then I suggest coating it with camellia oil between uses, this will keep the rust at bay.

*A nice tip I can give regarding the forming of a base patina is to sacrifice an onion which will turn the knife brown/golden mottled - wash/dry - then cut some cooked beef and give the warm juices a minute to do their thing before rinsing off. The beef will turn the blade blue/purple which is very beautiful. Raw beef and chicken can add some level of blue to the blade as well as fish. You'll see a basic pattern form that will pretty much stay put unless you do something nutty like cut 40lbs of tomatoes or something like that as that'll wipe away some of the formed patina.


Handles

In most cases we are using exotic hardwoods that have been stabilized. These woods should remain somewhat stable through normal use but can use some TLC to help keep them pretty and intact. I suggest using a combination of mineral oil/beeswax as you see fit. The more the handle is washed the more you may want to apply some protection.

For our carbon western full tang knives you will note that the exposed tang will patina with use and this is normal but the tang should be cared for the same as the blade is or it may rust.

For nickel silver & copper pins you can chose to allow the pins to patina or to wipe them clean to keep them shiny - this is up to you based on your tastes.


Sharpening & Honing

Martell knives have very thin edges sharpened somewhere in the neighborhood of 8-10 deg (per side). Our knives have the bevels set using water stones and then finish sharpened using belts so that our customers can easily find the bevel with no extra grinding work required. Martell knives are not knives that come with built in sharpening problems - they are ready to go to the stones when the time comes.

For in between sharpening sessions we suggest the use of a strop, be it felt pad or leather pad charged with a fine diamond compound.

*Note - If sharpening knives isn't your thing then that's OK since Martell knives come with FREE Lifetime Sharpening. Just send them in to us and we'll get them back to like new edges, you only need pay the shipping. :)


Storage

This is something that you'll have to decide for yourself - maybe a magnetic knife rack, a counter storage block, or even the supplied padded case will be fine but please don't throw one of our knives in a draw with other items and expect it not to be damaged as this won't be the case. Fine knives and junk drawers don't mix well.


If cared for properly your Martell knife should last you for a lifetime.

Thank you for your purchase of our knives! :thumbsup:

Dave Martell
 
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ecchef

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So a cycle through the dishwasher with extra-extra drying time is not advisable?!

Oops. :(
 

ecchef

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Hell...that thing can survive a mutant nuclear zombie holocaust now! :bigeek:

BTW, It's moved to the top of my favorite gyuto list.

Building patina on the suji, almost ready for pics. :thumbsup:
 

Keith Neal

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Thanks, Dave. You just answered several of my questions.

Keith
 

welshstar

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Dave

I tried cleaning my new knife with some Brillo pads I had brought over from the UK, they dont bother my Henckels but they have scratched up the mirror finish

Would you recommend Brasso or maybe some Autoglym to get the scratches out ?

Oops

Alan
 

Dave Martell

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Dave

I tried cleaning my new knife with some Brillo pads I had brought over from the UK, they dont bother my Henckels but they have scratched up the mirror finish

Would you recommend Brasso or maybe some Autoglym to get the scratches out ?

Oops

Alan

Please tell me you're joking....please!? :scared4:
 

Pensacola Tiger

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Brillo pads? Everybody knows it's green scrubbies and Barkeeper's Friend.
 

Burl Source

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How do I get the dings out of the spine from hammering the blade through a bone?
Should I be using a wooden mallet instead of a regular hammer?

Just teasing you Dave. This is a great thread for how to maintain our knives.
 

apicius9

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I thought I'd use some Scotch Brite on my Dremel, easier than hand scrubbing.

Stefan
 

welshstar

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Actually they do work well as a phillips head, not so much as a straight cut head
 

Horsemover

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Dave two questions for you regarding carbon steel upkeep.

You mention cleaning with hot water. I have heard various opinions on soap. Thoughts?

How about mineral oil for storage?
 

Dave Martell

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Dave two questions for you regarding carbon steel upkeep.

You mention cleaning with hot water. I have heard various opinions on soap. Thoughts?

How about mineral oil for storage?

Using soap is fine but for wood handles less is better.

If you infrequently use the knife, maybe only once in every few months, then I suggest coating it with camellia oil between uses, this will keep the rust at bay. Mineral oil could be used as well.
 

Kippington

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To discourage corrosion, you can store your carbon steel knife at cryogenic temperatures in a pure Argon environment.
Any sudden shocks to the knife under these conditions will void the warranty. :p
 

panda

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this thread is like saying 'noobs shouldnt buy my knives, but they do anyway so here is a disclaimer'
 

madelinez

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To discourage corrosion, you can store your carbon steel knife at cryogenic temperatures in a pure Argon environment.
Any sudden shocks to the knife under these conditions will void the warranty. :p
Just don't go below -189.4c or you'll have to chip the knife out of the frozen argon :p
 
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