How To Naniwa Chosera Base removal

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da_mich*

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Hello,
i have read many times, that some people like to remove their Naniwa Chosera stones from it´s cheap base but nobody gives a good answer to them.
I have removed three stones from it´s base without any damaging. Today i removed another stone from its base and made a tutorial video of it.
I hope you enjoy the video and it helps you to solve your naniwa base problem ;). Sorry for my bad english and video cutting performance.

Best Regards,
Michael

Link:
 

da_mich*

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Why would one take the risk of breaking it?
The Chosera base is rubbish. The rubber feets are constantly falling out. if you lose one you have a shaky base. After remove the base you have a stone with two sides. This is another advantage. You can use one side for single bevel knives and the other for double bevel. It increases the life of the stone.
 

da_mich*

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Michi

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I think the stone will explode in the ofen when there is any water left in the stone. I think it´s more risky then mechanical remove.
I thought about mechanical removal, too, but that seemed even more risky to me :)

Explosion is impossible. Consider how easily and quickly bubbles come out of a stone when it's immersed in water. If there is still some residual moisture in a stone when it goes into the oven, steam will come out of it just as easily.

For the Naniwa Chosera, the oven method would work. I'm not sure though about resinous stones, such as the Naniwa Super stones. They use a resin binder and I suspect that heat would soften the stone about as much as the glue. For sintered stones, the heat won't do any damage.

A steel wire to cut off the base would work, too, I'm sure.
 
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Matus

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I would use the gentleman's approach ... and simply grind it off with the coarsest belt I could find, it would take about 30 - 60 seconds. :D

I have a Naniwa SuperStone 5k I got for razors and the base is rubbish. Is is apparently not glued to the whole surface of the stone, plus it has zero stiffness, so the stone can keep bending / warping around as it get wet / dry. Drives me nuts. I will leave the base on as I will most likely be selling it (I moved to Shapton Glass stones for razors)
 

Ktva

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da_mich*

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Today I tested your method on my Suehiro Rika #5000 too. It works great with Suehiro at ~80°C, but I realize that it is another type of glue then Naniwa have.
Suehiro Glue is more like silicone. Maybe its silicone glue.
Naniwa use something like 2k epoxy glue. I think you need much more temperature to destroy the Naniwa glue.
Did you also try this method with Naniwa Chosera stones?
I still have both bases here. There are still remnants of the glue on it. Maybe I'll put both in the oven and see what happens to the glue and write a report here.
 

turko

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Today I tested your method on my Suehiro Rika #5000 too. It works great with Suehiro at ~80°C, but I realize that it is another type of glue then Naniwa have.
Suehiro Glue is more like silicone. Maybe its silicone glue.
Naniwa use something like 2k epoxy glue. I think you need much more temperature to destroy the Naniwa glue.
Did you also try this method with Naniwa Chosera stones?
I still have both bases here. There are still remnants of the glue on it. Maybe I'll put both in the oven and see what happens to the glue and write a report here.
Did you end up trying this on the naniwa bases?
 

DHunter86

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I tried the heating method on a Naniwa magnesia stone (not Chosera) today. Did not use an oven as I don't have one, but using my wife's hairdryer did the trick as well. The heat loosened it up, and a metal scraper was all that it took to pry the stone off the based, with almost zero damage to the stone. Forgot to take a picture of the base and stone right after removal. I've since sanded down the base (it was a wooden one), and flattened my stone's base.
 

ian

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You can use one side for single bevel knives and the other for double bevel. It increases the life of the stone.
What is the point of this? Do you like your stones completely flat for single bevel and not really care for double bevel, or something?
 

ModRQC

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I used this method for my Rika5000.

I just put the stone in the oven and heated it about 85c. When the oven was ready I waited few minutes and rip the base apart. Let it cool down and used Atoma to remove residual glue. Really fast and straightforward method. Big thaks to Michi.
Think I'm gonna have to try this with mine, such a useless base. Thanks for reporting.
 

kayman67

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In theory it's not useless, but it's so poorly glued, I imagine does more harm than good.
 

ModRQC

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In theory it's not useless, but it's so poorly glued, I imagine does more harm than good.
I appreciate the theory relating to solidifying the stone especially when it's worn down to the last few mm, but it also prevents the stone to dry evenly... I don't even know why I'm saying that :rolleyes: it dries pretty well anyway, the point is that the base has a tendency to slip, and also forces me to compensate my setup in height where all my other stones are baseless, so switching to the Rika is always a PITA because of that thing.
 

Dave Martell

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Just remember that the stones removed from bases might have been on a base for a good reason (like flexing/instability/crackability/etc) so take care with how you use them. The best safeguard against flex cracking is to use them laying flat on something vs a stone holder supported only on the ends.
 

dafox

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Anyone have a Naniwa Chosera base that they would give to me? I find this height to be just right on my counter top for sharpening. I usually use a base with attatched stone to put underneath the base-less stone that I'm going to use but it would be nice to not need to dry it out after use.
Thanks!
 

ModRQC

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In about 15 minutes I should be able to report that it went well or turned bad or 50/50. Both Cerax 320 and Rika are in the oven right now.
 

ModRQC

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I always have a rubber thingy under everything.
My setup is a pan over cork rests so that it doesn’t slip, then a stone holder with a brick on it, a damp rag, then the stone. I’m tall. The Rika won’t fit IN the stone holder... only way I could get the right height was doubling up the corks, removing the brick, and having the Rika base propped ON the stone holder with the damp rag in between to prevent it slipping. Sturdy but switching to it was a PITA compared to just switching baseless stones.
 
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