Hydroponic herb/plant systems

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sumis

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For an all in one method the Aerogarden (brand has different sizes) seems to have pretty good reviews.

I personally have used the Kratky system on a small scale and have had pretty good success. Went cheap and used "General Hydroponics" nutrients. Floramicro, Floragrow, and Florabloom.
 
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@Greenbriel adressed something in the what's cooking thread that i've been contemplating getting into:



i don't have a garden, buying herbs is … not ideal, growing them in traditional pots in my windows is limiting.

anyone with experience? is it worth it? what stuff to get?

thanks!

.

I'm waiting for my seeds to arrive but this is what I got. It's slightly simpler than the AeroGarden in that the pump simply moves the nutrient solution around in the reservoir, rather than pumping it onto an upper deck. But from all side-by-sides I've seen it grows every bit as well, and in some cases better, than some AeroGarden models. Fair bit cheaper too.

iDOO 12Pods Hydroponics Growing System, Indoor Garden with LED Grow Light, Plants Germination Kit, Built-in Fan, Automatic Timer, Adjustable Height Up to 11.3" for Home, Office

It was on a special for $66 when I bought it. It is amazing how reasonable these systems have got.

I also got these lights which are both great (for other plants, the iDOO has lights built in, obviously).

Grow Light Strips, LED 150-Bulb 3500K Dimmable Full Spectrum Plant Growing Lamp Bars for Indoor Plants Hydroponic Veg Succulent Seedling, Daisy-Chain Design

Plant Grow Light, Full Spectrum Clip-on Plant Lamp with White Red Blue Bulbs for Indoor Plants Growing, Dimmable Brightness & 3 Light Modes, Auto On/Off Timing 4 8 12Hrs

Thanks for the thread @sumis, I'll update here with results in a few weeks!
 
@Greenbriel adressed something in the what's cooking thread that i've been contemplating getting into:



i don't have a garden, buying herbs is … not ideal, growing them in traditional pots in my windows is limiting.

anyone with experience? is it worth it? what stuff to get?

thanks!

.
Buy a small tote box (16 - 20 gallon storage container with a lid), a few air stones, which you can find at a fish shop or pet shop, some plastic tubing, hydroponic net pots (2"-3"), some liquid nutrients, and some lights (this is where most of the expensive will come from). You can also buy a small cloning chamber (Rapid rooter try and some rapid rooter cubes work great). You can buy all this stuff on Amazon.

Tote Box - Storage container

3" Hydroponic Net Pots

Clay Pellets (for the net pots)

Air Stones

Pump For Air Stones

Rapid Rooter Tray

Rapid Rooter Cubes

Ballast & Grow Lights

It's pretty easy once you've picked out an area where you plan to grow. Cut a few holes in the top of your tote box (with room between each net pot) so your net pots will fit inside the holes. Place your germinated seeds into the rapid rooter cubes and then into the tray and wait for them to sprout. Once they sprout and are about two inches tall, you can move the seedlings into you hydro setup. The tote should be be filled with water by this time, and your water stones placed at the bottom of the tot box. The more air stones the better, but a minimum of four should be a good place to start. Figure out how much nutrients you'll need, then add the nutrients to the water, and place the lid back on the tote box.

Now place your seedlings in the rapid rooter cubes into the net pots that are securely resting in the holes you cut out of the lid on your tote box, but first places a small amount of the clay pellets into the net pots, then place the cubes inside, then add more pellets around the cub so the cube is stable and standing straight up. The clay pellets should be level with the rim of the net pot, and the rapid rooter cube should be slightly below the rim, covered with the pellets.

You can also drill a few holes into the tote box, so you can route your air tubes inside the box that feed your air stones. Just make sure you drill the holes high, above the maximum water level.

Hang your lights, turn them on and you should be good to go. Of course there are other things you'll need to learn, but it's all pretty simple. Take it one step at a time.

-gray.

Edit: I should have read the thread. It looks like you bought yourself a nice little setup. Good luck, and keep us informed on your grow!
 
Buy a small tote box (16 - 20 gallon storage container with a lid), a few air stones, which you can find at a fish shop or pet shop, some plastic tubing, hydroponic net pots (2"-3"), some liquid nutrients, and some lights (this is where most of the expensive will come from). You can also buy a small cloning chamber (Rapid rooter try and some rapid rooter cubes work great). You can buy all this stuff on Amazon.

Tote Box - Storage container

3" Hydroponic Net Pots

Clay Pellets (for the net pots)

Air Stones

Pump For Air Stones

Rapid Rooter Tray

Rapid Rooter Cubes

Ballast & Grow Lights

It's pretty easy once you've picked out an area where you plan to grow. Cut a few holes in the top of your tote box (with room between each net pot) so your net pots will fit inside the holes. Place your germinated seeds into the rapid rooter cubes and then into the tray and wait for them to sprout. Once they sprout and are about two inches tall, you can move the seedlings into you hydro setup. The tote should be be filled with water by this time, and your water stones placed at the bottom of the tot box. The more air stones the better, but a minimum of four should be a good place to start. Figure out how much nutrients you'll need, then add the nutrients to the water, and place the lid back on the tote box.

Now place your seedlings in the rapid rooter cubes into the net pots that are securely resting in the holes you cut out of the lid on your tote box, but first places a small amount of the clay pellets into the net pots, then place the cubes inside, then add more pellets around the cub so the cube is stable and standing straight up. The clay pellets should be level with the rim of the net pot, and the rapid rooter cube should be slightly below the rim, covered with the pellets.

You can also drill a few holes into the tote box, so you can route your air tubes inside the box that feed your air stones. Just make sure you drill the holes high, above the maximum water level.

Hang your lights, turn them on and you should be good to go. Of course there are other things you'll need to learn, but it's all pretty simple. Take it one step at a time.

-gray.

Edit: I should have read the thread. It looks like you bought yourself a nice little setup. Good luck, and keep us informed on your grow!
Thanks so much for this generous post! I definitely want to build a DIY system at some point, I just wanted to get up and running to dip my toe in the water and these things are so cheap these days!
 
Following this thread with interest. A primary interest in Chinese cooking limits how much I seek out fresh herbs, but I'd sure like to have ripe hot red chilis of various types on hand. They're really hard to find around here.
 
My seeds just arrived so I'll be planting this weekend!
Hi there. This seems a nice way to get fresh herbs all year round.

Are you happy with your setup? Does it work?

I kill my basil and chives in 3 days... Both outside and inside.. maybe this sistem can help?

Any updates? Thanks
 
It works just fine. Kind of a PITA to clean.

After one cycle I ended up starting 72 seeds in a 2x2 foot tent with an LED panel and then planted them outside in raised beds.
 
It works just fine. Kind of a PITA to clean.

After one cycle I ended up starting 72 seeds in a 2x2 foot tent with an LED panel and then planted them outside in raised beds.
Thanks for the update.

I guess you are no longer using it after one cycle. So you wodnt reccomand, if i understood you correctly.
 
Hi there. This seems a nice way to get fresh herbs all year round.

Are you happy with your setup? Does it work?

I kill my basil and chives in 3 days... Both outside and inside.. maybe this sistem can help?

Any updates? Thanks

Kratky style hydroponics in a 5 gallon bucket. Fill the bucket with water, add nutrients and mix, put plant on top. Put outside.

Basil on the left, tarragon on the right. These were setup in May.

20230818_084445.jpg
 
Anyone have any experiences, tips, lessons learned or do's and don'ts that might help me as someone who intends to start growing herbs indoor at some point in the near future? I have an appartment with neither balcony nor garden... but like the OP I'm tired of buying fresh herbs and throwing half of them away. Ideally I want to do it as easy and as cheaply as possible.
 
Thanks for the update.

I guess you are no longer using it after one cycle. So you wodnt reccomand, if i understood you correctly.
You're most welcome!

I wouldn't say I don't recommend it, it worked fine. Depends on your needs, and in my case what was available (I had the tent and light, and with that setup it's much easier to grow larger amounts).
 
+1 for Kratky. I started out with double stacked red solo cups and rock wool and sea of greened 50 pepper plants
 
Anyone have any experiences, tips, lessons learned or do's and don'ts that might help me as someone who intends to start growing herbs indoor at some point in the near future? I have an appartment with neither balcony nor garden... but like the OP I'm tired of buying fresh herbs and throwing half of them away. Ideally I want to do it as easy and as cheaply as possible.
I bought a cheap aerogarden off facebook marketplace, soil pods from amazon, and a variety seed packet. Maybe $60 total spent. Everything I grow I start hydroponically by seed, then move to the window when its large enough. Basil, micropeppers, mini tomatoes, dwarf lemons, etc. A small and cheap hydroponic system is great for starting a small garden.
 
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