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I broke a handle

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Ruso

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I was cutting a hard cheese and the handle snapped by the ferrule. It was quite surprising as I did not even apply that much force. Anyways, I am thinking to just glue it back together. Should I use epoxy, wood glue or something else?



 

ma_sha1

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Wow, that mouse tail is tiny. I’ve used both epoxy & JB wood glue, both works.
 

nexus1935

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Ouch! I always wondered about the strength of wa handle partial tangs, never experienced this myself so far (luckily)

Good luck on the fix!
 

timebard

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Yikes. I don't recognize the knife so pardon the ignorance--was this a stock handle, custom, homemade?
 

cotedupy

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FWIW I've had good results with epoxy for installing / repairing handles. It's strong af, and sets very quickly.

Though if you're as messy as I am- make sure you have some acetone / nail polish remover to clean up after ;)
 

daddy yo yo

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What a nice excuse to get a new knife, a proper one!!! :angel:
 
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inferno

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I was cutting a hard cheese and the handle snapped by the ferrule. It was quite surprising as I did not even apply that much force. Anyways, I am thinking to just glue it back together. Should I use epoxy, wood glue or something else?



tape up the wood with masking tape.
set masur birch upright in a vise or similar. hole upwards.
grind tang part so its scratchy so the glue has something to adhere to.
fill hole in birch with 24h epoxy.
push down tang once so the epoxy flows over.
clamp it down lightly so it doesnt move for 24h. you can use tape/some weight/a strap/strop or whatever you have.
personally i use a small clamp on the blade, and then a long clamp pressing on the small clamp and the bottom of the handle.

you can file the hole in the wood to make it scratchy inside.
you can also weld on extra tang and drill the handle a bit longer if you have a welder.
 

inferno

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this is why i usually file the slot in the handle so its snug. just drilling a hole can result in this.
 

cotedupy

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I concede that the above method certainly sounds fairly comprehensive, especially if you're after "results".

But I'd also give a quiet shout-out to my own procedure; which involves squashing as much epoxy as you have into any gap that you can see, comprehensively dousing yourself and the surrounding area in acetone shortly after, and hoping for the best.
 

spaceconvoy

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I'd use JB Weld, and would be too lazy to grind the tang, but would score it with an xacto before gluing. As long as you do something to provide more grip than smooth bare metal.
 

Ruso

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Yikes. I don't recognize the knife so pardon the ignorance--was this a stock handle, custom, homemade?
It’s a custom but it was a freebie, so cant really complain.

What a nice excuse to get a new knife, a proper one!!! :angel:
I am not sure why you don't consider Tanaka B2 a proper knife. It outperforms some knives twice the cost.

Thanks all for the suggestions, I will give an epoxy a try.
 

Benuser

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I think with epoxy, it will just shear again. Something mechanical should be added. I would add a couple 1" long x 1/8" pins on either side of the tang.
I was thinking of a virole.
 

M1k3

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I'd definitely go with some kind of mechanical support also.

Even just adding pins parallel to the tang across the break. Drill small holes on each side of the tang, in the handle, and insert some kind of pins or whatever, epoxy everything back together.
 

McMan

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Here's a trick:
Drill the holes (one set in ferrule one set in handle) wider than dowel you're using. This way the holes don't have to line up perfectly but you can still get the ferrule and handle to line up perfectly. If you don't build in this way to "cheat", then the ferrule and handle must be a perfect fit up or you'll have to sand the handle down to blend.
 

Ruso

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Using dowels to reinforce the joint is a good idea, but not having a drill bit that small will make it problematic. I think I will just try drowning the tang and the joint in epoxy and hope for the best.
 

Ruso

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I bought JB Weld 24hr Epoxy and used it couple weeks ago to amend the handle. I applied a decent amount to all the contact points and clamped it for 24hr. No dowels were used. Everything worked well. Today I was cutting some big hard carrots and the handle withstood it without any issues.
Thank you all for recommendations.
 
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