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Ericfg

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Also, if you are worried about geometry, I'd much rather have a thick heel than a thick tip. If you go the 7" route the front third of the knife is going to need SERIOUS thinning.
Agreed. Either way I'm losing a lot of function; not to mention history if I radically alter this profile. I lean more and more towards not effin' with it at all..
 
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Ah you didn't do so bad. You can fix the handles & blades. To get even blade road only take as little steel off to make it even.
I restored a batch of carbon cleavers bought off craigslist Honolulu paid under 10.00 each. Most had very nice grinds on them. Repaired some barrel handles, cleaned them up & put sharp edges on them. Sold them to culinary students. 10-15 each. Several were really nice. They had dented edges on their school kit Mercers breaking down chickens.
Introduced them to cleavers cheap.

When restored over 100 year old Sab. Had to even blade road slight frown at the heel. Didn't want to take off much steel. The thin tip had lost height from use. I know because my first Masamoto bought in 1982 had considerable distal taper at tip. Later Masamoto's bought didn't have that distal taper. It was my favorite but over the years with very heavy use the tip lost height just like this Sab. To get this Sab. sharp had to thin it heel to tip. Used Gesshin 400 to thin.
It's sharp cuts well, forced patina to protect the steel cut all kinds of vegetables & protein with it. Back 1890's early 20th century the French knew how to make a Chef knife with good geometry. Couldn't help had to grind off finger guard now can sharpen heel to tip.
IMG_20220907_132529698.jpg
 

Ericfg

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Here's the state of the ICBIWTA haul at the moment:
003.jpg

All, except the 100-9 have had their handles cleaned with soap and water and then oiled, and blades lightly rubbed with a very worn green scrubbie (aka Scotchbrite). That left most of the patina present, just seemed to tone it down just a tad.
 

Ericfg

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so must steeling on those over their life
Strangely only the one seems to have been abused that way. The big one (the 102-12) has had some serious grinding/thinning done to it but the edge is still straight. The other 4 show little signs of abuse to the edge or the blade face.

There was however some abuse that occurred during shipping. I've had a hard time getting decent images of the slight bend to the two slicers but here's what I got so far:
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edit: edited images to remove some stuff.
 
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You can bend those slicers back, because so narrow in height that's probably why they got bent in the first place.

The cracked handles esp. with no bolster I would repair don't want moisture getting under the wood.
 
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Start where blade meets handle if it's off lay blade flat on table bend until straight other bends you can also do by hand. Wood with slots in are used for straightening blades.
Thin slicers you can do by hand. Take your time check your work till it's straight.
 

Ericfg

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The last item from this auction showed up yesterday after work. It was misplaced by the seller and not included in the original shipment. I immediately contacted the seller and politely said an item had been not included probably 'by accident.' Thankfully the seller responded immediately and corrected the mistake.
Anyway, here's an older Henckles hone as received:
001.jpg

And here it sits next to a 1990s Henx hone. Very similar design (although the 90s hone is an oval model.)
002.jpg

Disassembled. Looks like brass for all the fittings. Wood handle has a very light color inside, so some sort of stain or paint to the outside, most likely done at the factory.
003.jpg

And finally a before and after image of the logo. I gave this a moderate cleanup in soap & warm water with a nylon brush, and after that a thorough drying. The rod still left a very dark mess on the white dishtowel I used to dry it.
006.jpg
 

M1k3

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Try using a little mineral oil to clean off the rod.
 

Ericfg

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Mineral oil as a cleaning agent? I used soap & water, as I said, to clean the major debris off the rod. After the photoshoot I used acetone and a paper towel to see what happened; very grey residue. I'll certainly use oil to keep any rust at bay but I don't see any reason to use it to clean the item. Am I missing something?
 

M1k3

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Mineral oil as a cleaning agent? I used soap & water, as I said, to clean the major debris off the rod. After the photoshoot I used acetone and a paper towel to see what happened; very grey residue. I'll certainly use oil to keep any rust at bay but I don't see any reason to use it to clean the item. Am I missing something?
If it has built up old/polymerized oil on it, the fresh oil will help it become liquid again.
 

boomchakabowwow

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i once bought a Sabatier chef knife. it was concaved from over sharpening like yours. but just barely. i had a pro try to reprofile the thing. it never felt right.

i will buy another one day, but now i want a heathier profile to begin with.
 

Ericfg

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i once bought a Sabatier chef knife. it was concaved from over sharpening like yours. but just barely. i had a pro try to reprofile the thing. it never felt right.
I had the same experience with a Henckels 102. I had a "pro sharpener" reprofile it for me. He did what I asked of him but I was not satisfied. I then worked on myself and got it to a usable state.
 
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i once bought a Sabatier chef knife. it was concaved from over sharpening like yours. but just barely. i had a pro try to reprofile the thing. it never felt right.

i will buy another one day, but now i want a heathier profile to begin with.
Yes loss of height from years of sharpening affects performance. Evened out blade road & thinned it so can get it very sharp. The thin tip is good for draw cut slicing. This was one of best I could find. Had absolutely no pitting on it. Many do have considerable rust damage. It is still a functional sharp carbon blade for home use. In production kitchen used my worn Masamoto for things like slicing maki sushi rolls with damp towel on board. I just couldn't retire it.
 
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