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I Tested the Edge Retention of 48 Steels

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ModRQC

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What’s your kind of use with it? Those are pretty thin so if even just somewhat sharp you don’t have to use much force. If you’re in the push/pull cutting ballpark you’ll benefit from keeness of the steel and thin edge, without so much wearing it out as you’d slicing against a hard medium - cutting surface that is. If you’re into rock chopping, baillonnette and the likes, then you’ll have to resharpen often but still less than a good deal of carbon steels if you just give it a more conservative edge angle. More worrying is toughness, but Kato doesn’t work the extremes of hardness, so adopt same thinking as if a lot of slicing against cutting surface occur: keep it thin but edge rather conservative. You might not have to sharpen as often as with a lot of slicing neither, but this would sure be unremarkable in home use.
 

Neofolis

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It needed sharpening when I got it and my whetstones still haven't arrived yet. I tend to push cut more than rocking or slicing, but I do rocking cuts, if I'm finely mincing things. I'm using it on Teak edge grain and I know Teak dulls knives faster than some materials. To be honest, I'm not overly bothered by edge retention at the moment, because I need plenty of sharpening practice.
 

Jason183

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It's a Kato 240 Nashiji Gyuto.
Liked other said a good heat treated AS can have 66HRC, I used to have Kato AS too, it was around 62-63, still not bad around that price point, it is a great Vegetable cutter, this is what it can do when it get sharp, hand made( Kato AS) VS machine peeler on white Radish
 

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DavidPF

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You know how they say a picture is worth a thousand words. I had hoped the nice pictures wouldn't make my head hurt as much as the text. Maybe reading at gone 2:30am wasn't the best choice. It seems like choosing Blue Super for my latest knife acquisition may also not have been the best choice.
You are still going to have to sharpen any knife. What you need is a knife that will go a reasonable number of uses before needing to be sharpened again, instead of having to sharpen it five times a day or something ridiculous like that. Your new knife is definitely going to allow you a reasonable not-difficult sharpening routine. It doesn't have to be the highest rated, it just needs to be in the "good knife zone" of the ratings and not the "crap knife zone". Hand-made knives need steel that allows for hand-made processes.

You did make a good choice. Sleep well knowing that. :)
 

M1k3

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It needed sharpening when I got it and my whetstones still haven't arrived yet. I tend to push cut more than rocking or slicing, but I do rocking cuts, if I'm finely mincing things. I'm using it on Teak edge grain and I know Teak dulls knives faster than some materials. To be honest, I'm not overly bothered by edge retention at the moment, because I need plenty of sharpening practice.
Don't stress over the cutting board. I regularly use poly cutting boards. Last night I was lazy and cut on a paper plate on my stone counter. And you know what happened? I ate dinner and the world kept turning. Oh and the knife didn't disintegrate.
 

captaincaed

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You know how they say a picture is worth a thousand words. I had hoped the nice pictures wouldn't make my head hurt as much as the text. Maybe reading at gone 2:30am wasn't the best choice. It seems like choosing Blue Super for my latest knife acquisition may also not have been the best choice.
Having had, sharpened and sold a fair number of high alloy and PM knives...lower alloy can be a lot easier to live with long term. It can be a real chore to sharpen and maintain steels with high wear resistance over time. Also, you can have one of each! Best of both worlds.
 

captaincaed

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Also, if @Deadboxhero (BBB) is ever interested in writing a bit about completely deburring an edge as coarse as 400 grit, I'd be interested in reading and absorbing that. I feel like I can do pretty well, but that's some next level action. Curious if he thinks a jig is necessary.
 

ModRQC

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Don't stress over the cutting board. I regularly use poly cutting boards. Last night I was lazy and cut on a paper plate on my stone counter. And you know what happened? I ate dinner and the world kept turning. Oh and the knife didn't disintegrate.
We want visual proof - defended to reglue the knife dust and photoshop. 🥸
 

Neofolis

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Don't stress over the cutting board. I regularly use poly cutting boards. Last night I was lazy and cut on a paper plate on my stone counter. And you know what happened? I ate dinner and the world kept turning. Oh and the knife didn't disintegrate.
It's fine, I don't really stress about anything or maybe I just don't have anything to stress about.
 

DavidPF

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It needed sharpening when I got it and my whetstones still haven't arrived yet. I tend to push cut more than rocking or slicing, but I do rocking cuts, if I'm finely mincing things. I'm using it on Teak edge grain and I know Teak dulls knives faster than some materials. To be honest, I'm not overly bothered by edge retention at the moment, because I need plenty of sharpening practice.
Teak might not be the most perfect, but at least it's wood and you can use it. Stone, glass, and metal are bad cutting board materials - teak is really OK when you have it, just if someone is shopping for a new board and could easily choose something else then they probably should. Definitely not something to waste time/energy/money over when you already have one.
 

Neofolis

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Teak might not be the most perfect, but at least it's wood and you can use it. Stone, glass, and metal are bad cutting board materials - teak is really OK when you have it, just if someone is shopping for a new board and could easily choose something else then they probably should. Definitely not something to waste time/energy/money over when you already have one.
My research on cutting boards was basically watch the YouTube video by America's Test Kitchen, then buy the cutting board they say. Like you say, it's an acceptable option, just not what I would choose if I was buying it now.
 
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