I use my stones to flatten my stones. Is this a bad idea?

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by Viggetorr, Feb 27, 2020.

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  1. Feb 27, 2020 #1

    Viggetorr

    Viggetorr

    Viggetorr

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    I have three stones, all Shapton Glass: 220, 1000 and 6000. I use the 220 to flatten the 1000, and the 1000 to flatten the 6000. It seems to work well to achieve flat stones, but my concern is that it will shorten the life of the stones. Is my concern justified? If so, is it the "flatteting stone" (that is, the coarser grit stone) or the stone being flattened (the finer grit stone) that loses the most material?
     
  2. Feb 27, 2020 #2

    Briochy

    Briochy

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    The moment that one stone becomes flat and the other still isn't, you start losing your stone. That's simple logic. So if you wanna use a stone to flatten the other, only do so when both of them aren't flat. When one of them becomes flat, stop.
     
  3. Feb 27, 2020 #3

    VICTOR J CREAZZI

    VICTOR J CREAZZI

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    :Iagree:
    I do this all of the time. I do it in conjunction with using a straight edge so that I can bias pressures toward taking the high areas off of the stones being used.

    In the OP's example, I would not hesitate to lap the 220 high areas against the 6k high areas. Typically, for me anyway, the low grit hones are the ones that need the most attention and have high areas of essentially 'free' abrasive to be used.

    A little off topic; There is a science to this practice. If two surfaces are lapped against each other until they mate, the interface will be spherical with the case of dead flat being a sphere with infinite radius. If three surfaces are made to mate AB,BC,CA, then the surfaces are flat. In practice as long as the radii are sufficiently large the surfaces are flat enough.
     
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  4. Feb 27, 2020 #4

    esoo

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    I do it all the time.

    I think the ideal would to have two of the same stone and use them to flatten each other - that way you don't contaminate with a lower grit.

    And to Briochy's point - yeah, you start losing stone, but it's just makes the opportunity to buy something else come up quicker...
     
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  5. Feb 27, 2020 #5

    Barmoley

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    I like flattening with a diamond plate.

    It is cheap https://www.japaneseknifeimports.co...accessories/products/diamond-flattening-plate
    It lasts for a very long time.
    It is known to be flat so don't need to worry about that part and can concentrate on making the stone flat.
    No grit contamination.

    Flattening stone with a stone works too, or you can do it on a sidewalk curb or other flat piece of concrete too.
     
  6. Feb 27, 2020 #6

    M1k3

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  7. Feb 27, 2020 #7

    Barmoley

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    Reminds me of a 3 cup and soft ball game, where they screw you out of your money, "pick a stone, any stone":LOL:
     
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  8. Feb 27, 2020 #8

    vicv

    vicv

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    I've done it but I do not like the smooth texture of the stones after. They do not cut as fast. I use 80 grit sic on a tile
     
  9. Feb 28, 2020 #9

    Desert Rat

    Desert Rat

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    It was a common practice at one time, done with three stones. Better options out there today but it works.
     
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  10. Feb 28, 2020 #10

    Viggetorr

    Viggetorr

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    As in, you start losing material from the flat stone as the one that is not flat eats out of the flat one until they're both flat?

    I'm a home user, and use my stones at most once a month. Is the loss of stone going to be significant enough to really matter?

    That looks like a great option, shame JKI's shipping costs to Sweden are ridiculously high. I would love to support them, but 65 USD shipping for a stone is hard to justify. Something similar here in Sweden (Atoma 140 from CC) cost more than double, which seems steep to me.

    Regarding the concrete/curb, won't material with such a high grit damage the stones? It seems very counter intuitive to me to grind my fancy 1000 grit stones with something like conrete, but maybe I'm just over protective? :D Wouldn't "grit contamination" be a factor there, as well?
     
  11. Feb 28, 2020 #11

    Michi

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    It depends on the concrete. Some slabs are really quite smooth and flat. (Check with a straight edge.) I don't see a problem with flattening a coarse stone on the concrete, then flattening the next finer stone with the coarse one, then flattening the "next-next" finer stone with the previous one, etc.

    But, really, and Atoma 140 does the job quickly and effectively. Worth the price, in my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2020
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