i was gifted a DMT DuoSharp

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Fine/coarse, 10"x4". My question is will this be enough for what I own? Now the knives.
I have three 4 Star Elephant Thiers-Issard carbons from I believe the 1950s-60s, a Lee Valley carbon and a few '90s Chicago Cutlery for anyone visiting. The carbon steels I've been taking to a local shop, but I would like to learn how to sharpen all of these myself. I don't have any current intention of purchasing any other knives, as these fit my hand pretty well. What's the opinion about this DuoSharp in my situation? Should I look for something different?
 
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Hmm, Marilyn and Audrey. I do like them both (and think MM was underrated as an actress) but I don't understand the reference?
 
That’s a nice combo, and 10” x 4”, that’s really nice!

I have a number of DMT’s and I really like them all (except for the Extra Extra Fine which is a poor design IMHO).

Check out ScienceOfSharp.com for more info on these and a “break in” technique. I like to use a piece of flat stainless steel (a plumbing cap works) and with lubricant, rub it gently over the stone to knock down any fragile protruding diamonds.

Just be aware that how it performs brand new is much different than when it is broken in. It will be extra aggressive for the break in period - usually around 20 knife sharpenings - then it smooths out and becomes more consistent once it settles.
 
That's a great diamond plate and will certainly be good for the knives you have. Watch a few guides on sharpening and you will be good to go. JKI has a good playlist on YouTube. Remember to keep pressure light to avoid stripping the diamonds of the plate. You could also consider water stones if the plate isn't too your liking, and use the plate to flatten.
 
I started sharpening with DMTs and hunting knives. Not fun to use but effective. Know that DMT "fine" translates to about 600(?) grit. (Don't remember zactly but remember it being quite low)
 
I started sharpening with DMTs and hunting knives. Not fun to use but effective. Know that DMT "fine" translates to about 600(?) grit. (Don't remember zactly but remember it being quite low)
"Fun to use", what's that mean? I remember the old farmer guy from when I was a kid tell me that sharpening his pocketknife was relaxing. Something along those lines or ?
 
Thanks, that diagram makes sense. So while there is nothing inherently wrong with diamond plate sharpeners, if (when) I fall deeper into this particular rabbit hole I will probably move on to a different style of sharpener so I can tell by feel how I am doing.
 
"Fun to use", what's that mean? I remember the old farmer guy from when I was a kid tell me that sharpening his pocketknife was relaxing. Something along those lines or ?
Sharpening can be very relaxing, and it's often a state of mindfulness. You may focus on the sensations and physical movements of the grinding, and this might clear your mind or ground you in the present moment. At least that is how I find it relaxing. Very similar to other mindfulness practices.

"Fun to use" is subjective but relates to the specific physical/tactile sensation of abrading the knife against that stone (as well as auditory expirence).

Each stone feels and sounds slightly different, and some people prefer one over the other. For example one stone might feel gritty and sound scratchy, while another feels smooth and glassy while sounding like a more gentle waves against the shore ASMR. Individual preferences vary significantly, there is no better or worse objectivity. This is commonly termed "feel" and isn't to be confused with the term "feedback" which usually refers to the ability to tell where you are on the stone.

Many people seem to prefer the tactile and auditory expirence of stones over diamond plates, but this is highly subjective and your mileage may vary. I personally enjoy both, but prefer coarse-medium stones that release some abrasive.
 
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