If you could do it all over again...

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by tdh, Jan 12, 2020.

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  1. Jan 14, 2020 #31

    toddnmd

    toddnmd

    toddnmd

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    Tdh , if you’re going to take a trip to JKI, I’d seriously consider picking up a knife along with a stone or two. I’ve never met Jon IRL, but hope to some day. I’ve seen many instances of him “down selling” to match a knife to a user. Especially those who are just starting out. A seller with the highest level of integrity. And his YouTube sharpening vids are a great resource.
    I also think it’s hard to go wrong with a KNS Tanaka. I have a Ginsanko, which is a great knife, but have heard great things about B#2 as well.
     
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  2. Jan 14, 2020 #32

    krx927

    krx927

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    Majority of important things were already written. I will repeat them and some additional info:




    For me that is the main point of buying Tojiro shears (in my case Diawood Kitchen Scissors which are the same). For kitchen work it is necessary to properly clean them -> you need to take them apart!



    Very valid feedback about sharpening supplies. The biggest mistake I did form the beginning was that I was not buying good enough sharpening supplies. First I went with Gatco system which is complete crap. Then I invested heavily in EdgePro which is better but still has it’s limitations -> you cannot thin knives. Only after that I bought a proper set of stones.


    I suggest that you buy good stones immediately. In my opinion at the beginning you need 1000&3000. Any finer you need to first evaluate 3k. Anything coarser you will not need at the beginning as it is used for thinning.


    There were already some suggestions which are good stones. At first it might seem hat is a lot of money to pay for the stones (perhaps even before you bought first good knife) but in the long run it will save you money.


    Also obviously do not learn how to sharpen on the good knives you will buy, but for this you have your old Shuns ;)





    Good suggestion -> just read a lot on the forum first.




    Like mentioned above about stones. And I also second the “buy the nest gyuto you can”. I use gyuto for 90% of all cutting.




    About the knives, I think this is best advice that was written. You do not need all the knives you mention from the beginning. Buy one good gyuto! Unfortunately it will be more like +300$ but you will never be sorry.


    If I could suggest one it would surely be Toyama (or Watanabe which is the same knife). Now they come in SS cladding so you will also not have such an issue with reactivity.


    One other thing that you must take into account is that J knives require proper handling like carbon ones tend to rust. You should not leave them on the counter dirty and forget on them for half a day or so.


    Also one thing that is not discussed much on KKF is the fact that these knives are really fragile beasts -> you can easily chip them, especially the tip. You just touch the sink with the tip and a millimeter is gone. Also they are not usable to cut anything really hard (frozen food, parmigiano, hard crusted bread…) -> you will chip the cutting edge.


    Read also about this aspect of J knives as for sure you have to be aware of this.



     
  3. Jan 14, 2020 #33

    Brian Weekley

    Brian Weekley

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    Available on Amazon

    0F0F8ADB-6628-47AA-A69D-B983CFF558CF.jpeg

    000E2B9A-434C-433B-904D-6C48196888ED.jpeg
     
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  4. Jan 14, 2020 #34

    Michi

    Michi

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    Anyone here who has read this? Reviews on Amazon are rather mixed…
     
  5. Jan 14, 2020 #35

    Barmoley

    Barmoley

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  6. Jan 14, 2020 #36

    Brian Weekley

    Brian Weekley

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    I’ve read it. Been collecting knives for a long time. Been sharpening for over fifty years. I refer to it regularly. For a noobie it’s full of information that would take years to discern and assemble by reading posts on KKF. I had two complaints with it. Firstly it focuses on the smiths working out of the Takefu Knife Village. There are lots of others. Secondly there was no consideration of western makers of Japanese style knives. However at 312 pages it covers the basic subjects well. As a jumping off point on Japanese knives it is, in my opinion, an excellent read.
     
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  7. Jan 14, 2020 #37

    Brian Weekley

    Brian Weekley

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    Haha Barm ... it’s called a teaser! I’m still planning the meal I’ll use to introduce it on “New Knives”! Great knife though. I’m indebted to the seller. Great guy!
     
  8. Jan 15, 2020 at 12:53 PM #38

    Luftmensch

    Luftmensch

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    @Brian Weekley; thanks for the mini review!

    To be fair the title suggests it might lean that way ;)

    The 'Knife finishes' and 'Steel lessons from a nerd and super-nerd' chapters look like potentially interesting reads
     
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  9. Jan 15, 2020 at 1:34 PM #39

    Brian Weekley

    Brian Weekley

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    Luft... Good point and at 312 pages the line had to be drawn somewhere. You have to give Kevin Kent credit. It was a big effort and it’s not like he’s going to sell a million copies. I found it to be an easy informative read that didn’t really dive into any subject too deeply. I liked the steel chapters too. I really liked the coverage of the Takefu village and some of the makers.
     
  10. Jan 15, 2020 at 3:33 PM #40

    LucasFur

    LucasFur

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    If i could do it all over ... I wish i bought a few i missed, and didnt buy a few i later re-sold.
    Live and Learn.
     
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  11. Jan 15, 2020 at 9:02 PM #41

    GorillaGrunt

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    Hard to say, because I had to do all the trying things out to learn what I liked and what I needed. I maybe would have taken the plunge on a few of the more expensive ones earlier, and skipped over some of the more entry level ones — but I didn’t have the knowledge to do so yet. I also might have waited until I was more comfortable sharpening and thinning before getting some of the exotic high alloy steels or before giving up and selling some of the knives.

    The only one I could say I ruined was a Tsubaki bunka from CKTG and it had problems to start with; I learned a lot by trying to fix it though that helped me with later projects and purchases. Even that one can probably be fixed eventually with a lot of time or a belt grinder.

    One big surprise was an Unshu Yukimitsu; at first I liked it out of the box, then I didn’t anymore, then I decided the geometry wasn’t actually good so I listed it but it didn’t sell. So I kept playing with it as I learned more and now it’s one I like a lot at home - just needed some thinning, and the bad sharpening jobs I did a year or two ago (putting too big of an edge bevel on, mostly) were part of the problem.

    And I hated the Masamoto KS.
     
  12. Jan 15, 2020 at 9:42 PM #42

    LucasFur

    LucasFur

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    How many times have you sold a knife that everybody seems to love?

    And you read the reviews after selling again, and think " jeez, did I just not sharpen it?!? , why didn't I like it"
     
  13. Jan 15, 2020 at 9:54 PM #43

    Barmoley

    Barmoley

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    This is a real thing, happened multiple times to me. I even bought some knives multiple times just to make sure. This is why you don't really know until you try for yourself, sometimes the likes and dislikes just can't be explained in any reasonable way. Some knives just work even though on paper they shouldn't and the other way around.
     
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  14. Jan 15, 2020 at 10:30 PM #44

    GorillaGrunt

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    Probably 5 or 6. Takeda I didn’t thin right (although it was not one of the Takedas everyone liked, but one of the newer ones that needed a regrind). Sukenari powder steels I bought all at once and early on, definitely needed more practice sharpening and thinning and will probably try HAP40 again and maybe YXR7 if I can find one. KS edge retention stank and I preferred every knife I’ve ever bought for the price over that one, beautiful as it is. Ikeda honyaki wanted thinning, but I had just done that with my Kageura and I like the height and grind on the latter.

    More frequent though is getting a knife everyone loves, and deciding it just isn’t for me, or isn’t for me at that time, or I didn’t get the right size or shape: Akebono was too long and flat of a Ktip for me, Toyama maybe I didn’t need a 270 (although I don’t know that I’ll get another now that I have a Shigehiro and Togashi), Takamura petty I got too small of one...

    Shigehiro is a good example because the 240 I was so excited to get was totally wrong, but then I got a 270 and it’s totally right. Bet I could have ground the Tsukiji Masamoto V1 into something awesome though.
     
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  15. Jan 15, 2020 at 10:55 PM #45

    labor of love

    labor of love

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    The $450 KS priced itself right out of the market lol. Yes, I bought many KSs over and over again now I’m permanently moved on from it.
    Shigehiro is just so good for bulk protein prepping, it wouldn’t be the knife I’d choose for lots of vegetables. Nevertheless it’s a fun bruiser.
    As much I like the Akebono I’m starting to gravitate more towards less “pointy” gyutos.
     

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