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Delbert Ealy

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I listened to a lecture the other day that got me thinking.
There are a lot of you out there that use knives daily and much more than I do.
This is the question I have, in the knives you have, and I don't mean just mine, is there an improvement that could be made. Or is there something, however small that bothers you about any of the knives you have.

I know this could turn into a b!!chfest and I really don't want that. It would help to avoid that if you refrain from naming the maker, even if it is a mass produced knife.I am most curious about issues that you have that are common in many knives, from both custom makers and manufactured knives.
Maybe I am chasing a chimera, but I would really appreciate a response. it got me thinking because the lecturer said to examine your assumptions, and sometimes the smallest detail can be important.
Thanks,
D
 

DamageInc

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Unpolished choils.

Handles too heavy.

Uneven kanji/maker stamps.

Handles not mounted completely straight.

But these things aren't too common, really. Except for the unpolished choils.
 

XooMG

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All my knives, even my favorites, could be improved...often in practical/functional ways. Since these features are not isolated but integrated, it's hard to really criticise a specific flaw without the surrounding knife as context. I have yet to encounter a knife that is flawless, so I'm not sure what Del is looking for in an answer.
 

daveb

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Communication.

The buyer has committed to something very special to him/her. They are looking forward to it. Want to know about it. It's like a baby being born.

The maker is cranking out another piece of steel and doesn't have time to waste on the expectant parents.

Each could think about the other's perspective.
 

Delbert Ealy

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All my knives, even my favorites, could be improved...often in practical/functional ways. Since these features are not isolated but integrated, it's hard to really criticise a specific flaw without the surrounding knife as context. I have yet to encounter a knife that is flawless, so I'm not sure what Del is looking for in an answer.


I wanted to see if there was something that you as constant users see and is obvious to you, but not to me as a maker. A lot of makers tend to see their knives like parents see their children. It often takes another perspective to point out things that could be improved.
In this case I am curious to see if there is an issue that we makers as a group are missing.
I am pretty happy with my current product, but I believe that there is always room for improvement.
While it is true that I am taking a bit of a break from knives, I can't stop thinking about them.
D
 

Delbert Ealy

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Communication.

The buyer has committed to something very special to him/her. They are looking forward to it. Want to know about it. It's like a baby being born.

The maker is cranking out another piece of steel and doesn't have time to waste on the expectant parents.

Each could think about the other's perspective.
GUILTY
I know this is true for me. For me this is my job and when I am finished there is a great sense of accomplishment, but it is true that there are times that I don't spend enough time with the customer. I will keep this in mind in the future.
I do feel this sometimes too though, wanting to know how my "children" are doing in their new homes.
D
 

ecchef

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The relationship between blade heel and bolster nose. If the bolster is shaped or situated in a way that makes heel sharpening a pain in the arse.
Does not apply to Del's work.
 

Marcelo Amaral

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Specially for gyutos, not enough clearance space for knuckles (due to heels not high enough).
 

jackslimpson

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The heals on knives (gyutos, pettys, etc.) with no bolsters. My preference is that they should be slightly radiused to remove the needle-like quality of heal. It might sacrifice a milimeter of edge, but will remove a feature that, in the feedback I've gotten, novices (i.e., recipients of my gifts or recommendation of knives) dislike the most. Otherwise, I've had a lot of success in getting people to Japanese, or non-mass market crap knives. They always complain about the heal. The few I've radiused myself have not got any complaints. Just a thought.

Cheers,

Jack
 

WildBoar

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That's a great thought. Rounding the heel and losing a couple mm off the edge does wonders for reducing blood-letting. It also lessens the chances of snagging the drying cloth.
 

Marcelo Amaral

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The heals on knives (gyutos, pettys, etc.) with no bolsters. My preference is that they should be slightly radiused to remove the needle-like quality of heal. It might sacrifice a milimeter of edge, but will remove a feature that, in the feedback I've gotten, novices (i.e., recipients of my gifts or recommendation of knives) dislike the most. Otherwise, I've had a lot of success in getting people to Japanese, or non-mass market crap knives. They always complain about the heal. The few I've radiused myself have not got any complaints. Just a thought.

Cheers,

Jack
Hi, Jack, by radiused heels you mean polished choils?
 

aboynamedsuita

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I see pros and cons to this. Yes I've cut myself in the past but at the same time it allows you to easily use the heel to (as one example) remove blemishes from vegetables (not as fun using a tip on a long gyuto). I suppose the end user could always add this feature if desired
 

jackslimpson

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I believe he means radiused similar to a Kramer...
Yes, like Chinacats said. I like polished choils, but, I meant a heal instead of being a hard right angle like the corner in an ' L' , a heal that is slightly rounded as you go from edge to choil. Don Carlos Andrade does it on a lot of his knives.

Cheers,

Jack
 

sachem allison

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I want handles on paring knives facing the other direction. belly of the handle toward the spine. It's hard to explain. when doing in hand work it feels more comfortable to me.
 

Dardeau

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I want handles on paring knives facing the other direction. belly of the handle toward the spine. It's hard to explain. when doing in hand work it feels more comfortable to me.
I am picking up what you are putting down.
 

jackslimpson

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I want handles on paring knives facing the other direction. belly of the handle toward the spine. It's hard to explain. when doing in hand work it feels more comfortable to me.
Brilliant. So simple, but brilliant. Someone out there make a prototype. I'd buy one immediately.

Cheers,

Jack
 

icanhaschzbrgr

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Brilliant. So simple, but brilliant. Someone out there make a prototype. I'd buy one immediately.

Cheers,

Jack


That's a factory made russian kitchen set called "Gorka" (translates as "the Hill"). Produced in ~200x. Enough to illustrate the idea of such handles.
 

sachem allison

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Subtlety is the key. This is too extreme. Harner/ McLean paring knife but reversed would work for me
.
 
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