Is this considered fast?

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by musicman980, May 31, 2019.

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  1. May 31, 2019 #1

    musicman980

    musicman980

    musicman980

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    Nakayama with a TF petty. Seeing as the black swarf is mostly soft cladding, how would you rate the speed of this jnat? It's hard, doesn't self slurry from what I can see, and kasumi shows it to be very fine.



    Nakayama Kasumi 2.jpg Nakayama Kasumi 1.jpg
     
  2. Jun 1, 2019 #2

    lemeneid

    lemeneid

    lemeneid

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    Looks like a lvl4 to me. Does it not produce mud? Anyway if there is black swarf it is cutting. How quickly does it take to form a burr? TFs are ridiculously easy to sharpen, and I can form a burr within 3 sweeps even on my finest and hardest jnat.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2019
  3. Jun 1, 2019 #3

    musicman980

    musicman980

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    It's mainly been used on hard razor steel up until today, never jigane, so I haven't tried to develop a burr or anything yet. Is that a more accurate test?
    As for generating its own mud, I don't see any. It has to be releasing a little something though because it does eventually lose perfect flatness.
     
  4. Jun 1, 2019 #4

    Barclid

    Barclid

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    You can polish the jigane to mirror or semi mirror on a synthetic and then see how long it takes you to establish a fully natural scratch pattern on the hard steel. You can blitz the surface of the stone with a worn-out atoma or DMT to get some it that stone in suspension which would help the stone to keep conditioned and cutting. It's definitely cutting metal but it's hard to say how much of it is hagane. It's usually safe to say that on simple carbon knives like that if you're getting inky black slurry with no nagura it's relatively fast for a natural, if not particularly muddy.

    Also that stiction moving your stone around is giving me anxiety. You should look into a sink bridge with end stops to prevent the stone moving or at least get a rubber stone holder to prevent a little. I've seen plenty of people cut themselves like that when the knife sticks to the stone.
     
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  5. Jun 2, 2019 #5

    M1k3

    M1k3

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    Not fun at all. Ask me how I know. :rolleyes:
     
  6. Jun 2, 2019 #6

    musicman980

    musicman980

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    A few stone holders are on my list of summer projects, although keeping the stone secure won’t stop stiction. I guess slurry would solve that.
     
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  7. Jun 3, 2019 #7

    Barclid

    Barclid

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    Doesn't stop stiction but the stiction alone isn't the dangerous part - if you know to anticipate it. Stiction mixed with your stone moving around is the scary bit. I recommend a sink bridge with adjustable end-stops.
     
  8. Jun 3, 2019 #8

    refcast

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    It looks like the speed is like 2.5-3/5 for that fineness. It's fine, I'd be ok with it. If you get the faster stones, they usually aren't as fine or as even in their finish, especially if they're hard. So long as there is no burnishing, I think the edges are sharper with your kind of stone, with better burr reduction. Just not as aggressive, which isn't a bad thing. I've sharpened TF's other lines, and they sharpen up really quick and ooze swarf on some of my stones, but I'd rate them at 3-4/5 in speed. I use a closed-foam sheet from michaels for my unevn-bottomed jnats. A thick enough cloth works just fine, too.
     

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