Is this rust on my nakiri and do I need to remove it to keep it from spreading?

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by lukehod, Mar 22, 2019.

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums by donating:

  1. Mar 22, 2019 #1

    lukehod

    lukehod

    lukehod

    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2015
    Messages:
    20
    I've had a couple of orange-ish spots on my Watanabe Pro Nakiri for a bit now and after looking at them more carefully, I'm worried it might be rust.

    It has not spread and there isn't any pitting as far as I can tell, what do you guys think?

    20190322_102916.jpg

    Is it worth going at it with some BKF just to be safe? I did just order some rust erasers but they wont arrive for about a week.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Mar 22, 2019 #2

    Paraffin

    Paraffin

    Paraffin

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2017
    Messages:
    491
    I can't tell if it's rust or patina from those photos, but if you want to clean it, what works well for me is to dampen one end of a wine cork and dip it in a little baking soda. Rub that on the steel and re-apply baking soda as needed. That's safer and easier than BKF or other cleaners, in my experience.
     
  3. Mar 22, 2019 #3

    wind88

    wind88

    wind88

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2015
    Messages:
    224
    Looks like surface rust to me. BKF should take care of if in no time.
     
  4. Mar 22, 2019 #4

    Migraine

    Migraine

    Migraine

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    270
    I'll be honest, after spending quite a bit of time reading "is this rust" threads on here, I'm more confused than ever about what is and isn't rust.

    Answers range from "I have a PhD in metal things and anything orange is rust" to "so long as it's not actively pitting it's fine". I was inclined to go with the "if it's orange it's rust" school of thought, but Dan Prendergast has put up a couple of knives lately with patinas which wouldn't look out of place at your local "dress up as a pumpkin" party and I'd feel very safe assuming he's not selling rusty knives so back to square one.
     
  5. Mar 22, 2019 #5

    Mute-on

    Mute-on

    Mute-on

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2013
    Messages:
    816
    Yes it is light surface rust, early patina, depending on your POV (see Migraine’s post, above). Yes it will happen to any carbon blade, particularly one that hasn’t built up a stable patina. No it does not have to be a problem.

    Make up a paste of baking powder and rub it with a cork (or your finger, carefully). Do not use a rust eraser. It is total overkill and will mess up your edge.

    Always dry your carbon blades very thorough after use. If it sits wet for a period of time, you will see this discolouration become more rust like.

    Better yet, buy a big bag of onions and slice up the lot to make a French onion soup. Rinse and repeat.
     
  6. Mar 22, 2019 #6

    Gregmega

    Gregmega

    Gregmega

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2017
    Messages:
    337
    Yeah man. A quick rub down (as most these guys are saying) and get a patina rolling. Best way to keep the orange away. It’ll be fine.

    Best way I’ve set a patina in the past is roast a chicken breast and slice while hot, rub the slice over the whole of the exposed steel you want to patina. Wipe, rinse in hot water, dry, slice, repeat. Especially with knives I know are gonna be reactive, this is the first thing I do.
     
  7. Mar 22, 2019 #7

    Olsen

    Olsen

    Olsen

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2012
    Messages:
    62
    My ex-girlfriend (not becase of that) left a small carbon petty in a plastic tub filled with water for the whole day. It seemd quite rusty but after a short cleaning it was fine. Pitting will only come after a long time of contact with water. Apparently 12 hours in water is not a long time :D
     
  8. Mar 23, 2019 #8

    inferno

    inferno

    inferno

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2018
    Messages:
    684
    lol!

    I just had a look at my black masamoto blue 2 santoku, and guess what. it had several rust spots just from living in my kitchen for a few months undisturbed. you know what i did with that??
    I took a scotchbrite pad and removed it! all 2 cm2 of it kinda. and now it gone. took me maybe 2 minutes to do this spectacular thing.

    in you case i wouldn't even bother bringing the scotchbrite out at all!! i would just use it!! and if would disappear with use.
     
  9. Mar 23, 2019 #9

    playero

    playero

    playero

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2016
    Messages:
    120
    Use mustard and vinegar for a good patina. There’s a video regarding this.
     
  10. Mar 23, 2019 #10

    Michi

    Michi

    Michi

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2019
    Messages:
    710
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    If you don't use a knife regularly, give it very thin coat of Camellia oil before you put it away to prevent rust. Especially in a more humid climate, carbon steel knives will rust in the drawer over time, even when inside a Saya.
     
  11. Mar 23, 2019 #11

    Noodle Soup

    Noodle Soup

    Noodle Soup

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2011
    Messages:
    1,487
    Its light rust. Use some Bar Keepers Friend on it. No big deal.
     
  12. Mar 24, 2019 #12

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Messages:
    5,395
    Rub with a towel to get it smooth, rinse with a lot of very hot water. Repeat a few times. Patina is a further oxidation of rust. It is probably a very superficial rust, so you change it into patina.
     
  13. Mar 25, 2019 #13

    Foltest

    Foltest

    Foltest

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2017
    Messages:
    53
    I would ignore it, wash it few times and the knife will be fine. Also, if it is rust, it will dissolve when you will cut acidic food
     

Share This Page