Quantcast

It's Chili season - show your recipes

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

StephanFowler

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2011
Messages
168
Reaction score
0
Here's how I make chili


[video=youtube;gbzJ0jwcEiQ]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbzJ0jwcEiQ[/video]

4 Lb Chuck Roast cubed
1 Lb Andoille sausage
4 Large Sweet Onions
1 Cup Brandy (substitute beer here if you want)
1 Poblano pepper
2 Serrano peppers
1/2 Habanero pepper
4 Large firm tomatoes
Seasonings - Smoked Chipotle chili powder, salt, pepper, paprika to taste


spices cooks in a crock pot for at least 8 hours it's best to let it cook and then cool to rest for at least 24 hours prior to eating. Thanks Stephan
 

mateo

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 10, 2011
Messages
92
Reaction score
0
mmm... chili, I'm still refining my recipe, but it's like yours -- a chili con carne style, no beans, corn, mushrooms... etc. :)

Although a big breakthrough was making my own chili powder:
3 Ancho Chiles
2 Guajillo chiles
3 chiles de arbol
2 Dried chipotle chiles
2 Tbs cumin seed

Toast all that in a skillet (after coarsely chopping chiles and removing seeds), once fragrant cool and grind. Then add:

1Tbs. smoked paprika
2 tsp oregano
2tsp garlic powder (maybe some onion powder)

:p Yum! My chili has about 3 Tbs of this in it... about one Tbs per pound of meat I use.

I like caramelizing the onions first... I'll have to try that sometime, probably adds some nice depth and sweetness to balance the chiles.
 

StephanFowler

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2011
Messages
168
Reaction score
0
and the brandy is weird,

If I set two bowls in front of you, one with the brandy and one without you'd know something was different, but it's really subtle
 

The Edge

Professional Craftsman
Joined
Aug 6, 2011
Messages
877
Reaction score
592
Location
Reno, NV
Chili is the first thing I ever learned how to make, and now the recipe usually comes down to my mood at the time.

First decision is whether I'm being lazy or not, which is the choice between ground beef and chuck. If I choose chuck, I'll cut it into roughly 1//2" cubes. The meat is then heavily browned, then removed.

Next, I start to caramelize the onion to which I add a mix of the following ingredients:
Guajillo chiles (add a bright vibrant chile flavor)
Ancho chiles (earthy chile flavor)
Chipotle chile (smoky heat)
serano or jalepeno chiles (fresher flavor)
cumin seeds
coriander seeds (I usually double the amount of coriander to cumin, but this is a personal preference)
2 or 3 cloves
and garlic powder

I'll let these flavors develop quite well before I add tomatoes, roasted red peppers, roasted pablanos, and for me beans.
Then I'll add water or stock to cover and simmer for at least 2 or 3 hours.

Before serving, I'll chop cilantro and add it to the pot to keep the flavor fresh and pungent.
 

The Edge

Professional Craftsman
Joined
Aug 6, 2011
Messages
877
Reaction score
592
Location
Reno, NV
I'm going to have to give the brandy a shot, that sounds pretty good.
 

stevenStefano

Senior Member
Joined
May 7, 2011
Messages
1,421
Reaction score
1
I normally use beer when I make chilli and I think it makes it awesome but brandy is interesting. I've also heard of people making it with Martini
 

mr drinky

Founding Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
3,544
Reaction score
13
You're right. It is time to start thinking about chili.

If you want ideas to try out, here are some of the winning recipes from the International Chili Cookoff dating back to 1970.

Chili Recipes

Btw, America's Test Kitchen tested chili powders a while back and Spice Island Chili Powder was the clear winner. I've only made chili a half dozen times, but this year I am going to try the Cook's Illustrated recipe that was mentioned in Jan 2011. Here is their recipe.

k.
 

Kyle

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
505
Reaction score
0
I didn't grow up eating much good chili so I don't have any preferences for it. To me chili is a great way to get rid of leftovers, so I usually just go with whats in the frdige and pantry. Last week I had a couple pounds of leftover smoked rib trimmings so I started with that and used only stuff I had on hand to make a pot of chili: 4 ears of corn leftover from a party the day before, 3 cans of beans (black, kidney and pints), fresh hatch chiles, onion, bell pepper and spices. It wouldn't win any awards and purists would scoff at the amount of beans, but it super cheap and my roommates devoured up the whole pot in two days.

Once the weather cools I think I'm going to try my hand at a good chili recipe and see how it goes.
 

wenus2

Founding Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2011
Messages
867
Reaction score
0
If you want ideas to try out, here are some of the winning recipes from the International Chili Cookoff dating back to 1970.
Chili Recipes
Great Link. I've competed in a handful of ICS competitions, it's really a good time. Never won, but we do have a handful of peoples choice trophies collecting dust.

If you are a chili fan and really want to step up your product, the best improvement you can make is to increase the quality of your chili powder and cumin. While I will not doubt America's Test Kitchen's ranking of grocery store brands, I will add that Gebharts is the choice of many pros. Beyond that, none of those options hold a candle to using a REAL FRESH NEW MEXICO CHILI POWDER. Also be sure and check out the SW Blackening Rub from these guys, it's on a whole 'nother level than what most of us are used to seeing.
Chili powder has a short shelf life, sealed or not. Almost anything sitting on your grocery store shelf has already lost most of its ooomph. Keep your chili powder sealed air-tight in the freezer to get the most out of it.

Also, don't forget the tortillas OR cornbread!
 

SpikeC

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
3,717
Reaction score
2
The ATK recipe recommends making your own chili powder, not using grocery store brands.
 

mr drinky

Founding Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
3,544
Reaction score
13
Yeah, I saw that, but back in 2005 they tested the store brands and picked the best one.

k.
 

SpikeC

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
3,717
Reaction score
2
So how about using pork instead of beef in chili? I do pork chili verde, but why not pork red?
 

StephanFowler

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2011
Messages
168
Reaction score
0
So how about using pork instead of beef in chili? I do pork chili verde, but why not pork red?
I've subbed pork loin for the chuck roast before and it works ok

the pork tends to dry out if your not really careful

I went with 4 hours on the crock pot and it was about right
 

Kyle

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2011
Messages
505
Reaction score
0
I've subbed pork loin for the chuck roast before and it works ok

the pork tends to dry out if your not really careful

I went with 4 hours on the crock pot and it was about right
What about subbing pork loin for pork butt? Much higher internal fat content and won't dry out as much.
 

HHH Knives

Founding Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2011
Messages
5,604
Reaction score
244
Location
USA, Michigan
Great recipes, I have never used Pork Butt, lol but almost always use some pork sausage!

Im cooking a big pot of chili this weekend for the Get Together! Thanks for posting It gives me some new fresh ideas and will make this batch better! :)
 

9mmbhp

Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
146
Reaction score
10
So how about using pork instead of beef in chili? I do pork chili verde, but why not pork red?
Carne Adovada - pork stewed with red chile - is very popular in New Mexico.


One of the glories of New Mexican cuisine is carne adovada, that is, ‘adoboed meat’. The dish is really a variant of carne en chile colorado discussed hereabove. The sauce is just a simple version of the one described above,* in which one uses only dried red New Mexican chiles, some water, a healthy dose of garlic and perhaps some oregano. The meat used is pork (shoulder is a good cut), preferably not too fatty, cut into pieces, the size and form of which can vary according to personal taste, though in the versions I’ve had in (or from -- see below) New Mexico the pieces have been fairly small chunks. Crucial to this dish is the fact that the meat is marinated for a long time (at least overnight) in the red chile sauce; some extra garlic cloves can be added to the marinade. Actual cooking is done slowly in a not-too-hot oven (300-325º for several hours) and some people finish the dish briefly in a hot pan or under the broiler (e.g., Regina Romero). The finished product should be fairly ‘tight’, sufficiently so that it can serve as a not at all sloppy filling for a tortilla or burrito.​


* If one surveys a lot of recipes for this dish, one comes across versions in which the red chile sauce includes some flavourings beyond the chiles and garlic mentioned above; oregano is quite common and cumin is also a fairly common addition and there are yet others I’ve seen. But the best examples of this dish that I’ve had were, I firmly believe, maximally simple (and when we've made the dish, that's how we've done it). One such version, made on one of the Native American pueblos in New Mexico and brought to us (frozen) by a friend a couple of weeks ago was to my mind pretty much perfect. Red chiles of medium heat, garlic and pork. In a word: wow.
 

9mmbhp

Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
146
Reaction score
10
I neglected to attribute the two paragraphs in my previous post, they come from the last post of this discussion (which is worth reading!).
 

wenus2

Founding Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2011
Messages
867
Reaction score
0
interesting link 9mmbhp, thnx for sharing.
 

Amon-Rukh

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2011
Messages
299
Reaction score
0
My fiancee doesn't eat red meat, so I generally do chili with chunks of chicken instead of beef. Pork sounds good too; I'll have to give that a try some time.

For cornbread, I usually more or less just follow Alton Brown's recipe: online version here with some basil added. I like to make my own creamed corn for using in this/eating on its own too.
 

bikehunter

Banned
Joined
Mar 28, 2011
Messages
905
Reaction score
1
Anyone have a great cornbread recipe to go with the chile?
I know you "from scratch" purists will cringe (or those who like "Southern style" cornbread, with no sweetness), but I take an ordinary box of Jiffy cornbread mix, saute some onions, bell pepper and a finely minced jalapeno or serrano, add a little honey (adjust your added liquid). Pour the batter into a greased, preheated 8" cast iron skillet, 400 degree oven. 20 minutes later, you have a tasty, beautifully browned hunk of cornbread that's great with chili, hamhocks and beans, beef stew, or whatever. Not fancy but I really like it.
 

SpikeC

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2011
Messages
3,717
Reaction score
2
Add some frozen corn to that and you've got something!
 

Ratton

Founding Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
190
Reaction score
0
Anyone have a great cornbread recipe to go with the chile?
Try this, you'll love it!!!

Cast Iron Skillet Corn Bread
Ingredients:
Dry: 1. 1 ¼ cups coarse corn meal
2. ¾ cup all-purpose flour
3. ¼ cup granulated sugar
4. 2 teaspoons baking power
5. 1 teaspoon kosher salt
6. ½ teaspoon baking soda
Wet: 1. 1 1/3 cups buttermilk
2. 2eggs, lightly beaten
3. 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
Procedure:
1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees, and place a 9 inch cast iron skillet inside to heat while making the batter.
2. In a large bowl, whisk together all the dry ingredients.
3. In another bowl, whisk together all the wet ingredients, reserving 1 tablespoon of butter for the skillet.
4. Now whisk together the dry and wet ingredients.
5. Carefully remove the hot skillet from the oven.
6. Reduce the oven temp to 375 degrees.
7. Coat the bottom and sides of the hot skillet with the remaining butter.
8. Pour batter into the skillet and place in the center of the oven.
9. Bake until the center is firm and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, about 2o to 25 minutes.
10. Allow to cool for 10 to 15 minutes and serve! :cheffry:
 

bikehunter

Banned
Joined
Mar 28, 2011
Messages
905
Reaction score
1
This looks killer, Ratton, but WAAAAY too elaborate for a lazy old bachelor. <G>
 

WillC

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Messages
2,106
Reaction score
1
This thread is making me hungry..... I kind of make my food up as I go along, But like a zesty chilli and add limes lime zest of fresh OJ to mine to balance a touch of sweetness. As well as naga chilli if I've got any on the plant.
 

apicius9

Das HandleMeister
Founding Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
3,953
Reaction score
8
Really great stuff here. Nothing like a hot chili on a cold Hawaiian winter night ;) just wondering, does anybody have a good recipe for a green pork chili? I remember having one in Vale, CO, of all places that was fabulous, but I never tried one myself.

Stefan
 

Latest posts

Top