Keep thinning or call it good?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Dylan, Mar 3, 2019.

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  1. Mar 3, 2019 #1

    Dylan

    Dylan

    Dylan

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    I’ll get it out of the way now and admit I forgot to take a before shot, but just trust me when I say this knife was a bit fat when I started thinning. And with that out of the way, this is how it sits now:
    8679FAC6-A46E-4119-9076-752B4C6C32B6.jpeg
    Cuts only slightly better than when I started, but doesn’t wedge quite as bad on the potato I sacrificed on it.

    So do I keep screwing with it or leave it alone? How do you guys judge these things?

    -Dylan
     
  2. Mar 3, 2019 #2

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

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    Personally I only thin until it 'works', I don't thin it as thin as much as possible...

    (pro-tip: leave the scratches for a while so you're not affraid to fix it...)
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2019
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  3. Mar 3, 2019 #3

    Dylan

    Dylan

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    It’s honestly killing me to see it all uglied up, especially since I put a bunch of scratches in unintended places... but, tools a tool... have to keep telling myself that lol
     
  4. Mar 3, 2019 #4

    Nikabrik

    Nikabrik

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    Depending on the grit and direction of the scratches, I feel like they can result in added friction when cutting. I certainly felt mine when cutting apple (it squeaked, too).

    That said, it doesn't have to be polished to eliminate that friction.
     
  5. Mar 3, 2019 #5

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

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    ~400 grit is fine for actual use

    (I meant don't try to make it look all perfect and "unscratched" ;))
     
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  6. Mar 3, 2019 #6

    Dylan

    Dylan

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    I did another session on the 220 grit and put an edge on it to test and I think it’s “good enough” now. The tip made the biggest difference. Looks too thin now, but glides through soft stuff like it’s not even there so i’m cool with it.

    I don’t think i’ll be doing any mirror finish, but do want it to be smooth and will get some sandpaper for that when i’m ready.

    Ever since I experienced wa handles I don’t see a reason to have anything else anymore, so i’m planning on converting that on this knife. Once the bolsters are gone i’ll go back and smooth out the scratches. Don’t think I have the patience for mirror lol

    We’ll see how it turns out!
     
  7. Mar 3, 2019 #7

    labor of love

    labor of love

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    Mirror polish is lame and not worth the time.
     
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  8. Mar 3, 2019 #8

    ForeverLearning

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    If you have never tried to get a mirror finish I would do it at some point, maybe not on this.

    There is something satisfying about going up and up in grits seeing scratches disappear and the grin on your face come in to shot
     
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  9. Jun 6, 2019 #9

    Fred Rowe

    Fred Rowe

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    Good Evening, .
    Was the primary bevel taken to zero or close to zero before the cutting edge was applied? It's what's behind the edge that dictates how well a knife cuts.

    Regards, Fred
     
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  10. Jun 6, 2019 #10

    Jville

    Jville

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    Agreed, it looked a little thick right behind the edge, but sometimes choil shots are tricky/misleading.
     
  11. Jun 6, 2019 #11

    M1k3

    M1k3

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    That satisfaction and grin is priceless. Then you say to yourself "Yeah, not doing that again anytime soon."
     
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  12. Jun 6, 2019 #12

    Fred Rowe

    Fred Rowe

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    There is nothing more clarifying than having the knife in one's hand. Also, being able to observe an edge, straight on, is one of the best ways of accessing the geometry of an edge. I clamp blades in a soft jawed vice, edge up, and then look the edge over with a lighted magnifier; if the edge can be seen, it's to thick in that particular area.

    Regards, Fred
     

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