Kitchen Knife Glossary redux

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Great thread. Wish I had found it sooner. Trying to figure out what everyone is saying in my little fifteen minute windows of viewing time was getting difficult. So I started looking for a “wiki” or some such set of files and, of course, found this.

The nice thing about a wiki is it allows for necessary material without all the clutter of comments. If there is a wiki and I haven’t seen it because of using a small phone screen, please let me know.

Thanks for taking the time to write this stuff out.
 
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Even if it only means we’d have permanent edit privileges, it’d be an improvement….
I’ve tried searching certain terms/acronyms and was quickly lost in a sea of lengthy threads. Probably not much of a problem if one has lots of time.

I ended up buying four knives from two members in brief intervals of free time. I got to the point where I just trusted that I was probably getting something good and didn’t have enough time to thoroughly research.
 
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Great thread!

Might I recommend changing the definition of carbon steel? Currently, the definition is this:

A steel with less than 13% Chromium. That is all this term implies. It does NOT imply that it is harder, more durable, sharper, or otherwise superior. It also does not mean that it needs to be treated like a newborn to keep it from rusting. Basic knife safety and hygiene is enough to prevent rusting and corrosion. A patina can also go a long way to keeping reactivity low. All steel contains Carbon(in addition to Iron, and others), but only steel with less than 13% Chromium is called Carbon Steel .

While I understand that some tool steel companies define carbon steel this way it but the 13% Cr line is not strictly accurate(ex. Magnacut, D3, ZDP-189 etc.) While this is a fairly accurate standard right now I have a feeling with the direction of steel development, it is going to become less and less workable.

Maybe change it to something like: A steel general understood to be susceptible to corrosion in everyday normal usage............... all steel contains Carbon(in addition to Iron, and others), but only steel that corrodes more easily is called Carbon Steel.

That's not a perfect definition but maybe people below would like to chime in.
 

ian

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Great thread!

Might I recommend changing the definition of carbon steel? Currently, the definition is this:



While I understand that some tool steel companies define carbon steel this way it but the 13% Cr line is not strictly accurate(ex. Magnacut, D3, ZDP-189 etc.) While this is a fairly accurate standard right now I have a feeling with the direction of steel development, it is going to become less and less workable.

Maybe change it to something like: A steel general understood to be susceptible to corrosion in everyday normal usage............... all steel contains Carbon(in addition to Iron, and others), but only steel that corrodes more easily is called Carbon Steel.

That's not a perfect definition but maybe people below would like to chime in.

Yea, that does sound more accurate. I’ve given up asking to get edit privileges again on the original posts… I’ve asked 3 or 4 times now. But if I had them, I’d edit it.
 

daveb

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Yea, that does sound more accurate. I’ve given up asking to get edit privileges again on the original posts… I’ve asked 3 or 4 times now. But if I had them, I’d edit it.

Hit me or other mod with a link and zactly what you want to change and it may happen.
 

BoSharpens

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ZKnives has a very interesting, long section on California knife law that covers an immense amount of ground and he only summarized some of it.

I literally had never had any reason to read California laws on knives, but boy …

So I found that my Ballisong is illegal to carry. I didn't see if it was illegal to own but knowning California, I can guess, YES. Hey, I bought it probably 55 years ago at Grants for Guns in Costa Mesa. Never had a clue that it was illegal to carry.

It's legal to carry a 4" dagger/hunting knife, but it has to be on the waist with the handle visible. Hmmm. OK, got to tuck my shirt in. But a Kershaw 4" in a pocket totally hidden seems to be OK. Unless you are in the Bay area where anything over 3" is illegal to carry.

I never realized the expanse of laws on knives and anything with a blade were so extensive in California, though it is likely true in a lot of other places, too.
 
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