Knife Recommendation - Dishwasher Safe and Sharpened by Electronic Sharpener

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RubbishCook

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I want a nice set of knives for a second home. I want them to be dishwasher safe and work well with an electronic sharpener like a chefs choice (if someone has recommendation for the sharpener I would be curious too).

I am considering Forschner, Opinel Intempora, and GÜDE Kappa. Are there others I should look at that will take well to electronic sharpening and be dishwasher safe?

I am in the USA. I would like to spend $600 or less on 2-3 knives. I really just need a chefs knife and a pairing knife.
 

tostadas

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Delat

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People are teasing you because this is a knife forum for enthusiasts, but honestly your request is representative of 99.9% of normal people. People on this forum are not normal :cool:

Probably just grab one of these sets. Avoid ones with full bolster as the bolster won’t go through the sharpening slots of your electric sharpener. Chef’s Choice electric sharpeners are good representatives of the species.

 

Delat

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I wasnt sure if this was a serious post. If so, I'd recommend get a set of Victorinox knives in whatever size/type you need. They are the best value for the money.
I was thinking that for a 2nd home he might be renting it out (e.g. airbnb) or maybe have random relatives using it, so he doesn’t know how the knives will be treated. I’d get a cheapo knock-around set (like Victorinox) myself under those circumstances, and maybe hide a JCK Natures or Gesshin stainless in the back of a cupboard for myself.
 

RubbishCook

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I just want knives that I will enjoy using and wont need to worry about. I'll get some of the Victorinox. I guess they dont call them Forschner anymore. Thanks for your help.
 

ModRQC

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I just want knives that I will enjoy using and wont need to worry about. I'll get some of the Victorinox. I guess they dont call them Forschner anymore. Thanks for your help.
Fibrox. Or if necessary to splurge uselessly, the Grand Maitre. Just don't bring anything Rosewood or Swiss Modern or whatever they call that middle of the road line. Handles won't take kindly at all to the dishwasher.
 

inferno

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I want a nice set of knives for a second home. I want them to be dishwasher safe and work well with an electronic sharpener like a chefs choice (if someone has recommendation for the sharpener I would be curious too).

I am considering Forschner, Opinel Intempora, and GÜDE Kappa. Are there others I should look at that will take well to electronic sharpening and be dishwasher safe?

I am in the USA. I would like to spend $600 or less on 2-3 knives. I really just need a chefs knife and a pairing knife.
probably all germans without wood handles are dishwasher safe. they all use the krupp 1.4116 steel or sandvik 12c27m. and these steels were developed especially to be dishwasher safe. its not good for the edges though.

also fiskars has a line called "norr" and it uses a wood based material called kebony and i think this this might be dishwasher safe too.

 

Qapla'

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I'm guessing some of the all-metal knives are also a choice here.
 
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GorillaGrunt

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With these criteria I’d look at the kind of stuff that are house knives in pro kitchens rather than knives marketed to home cooks, so +1 Victorinox/Forschner and also Dexter. Not Mercer though
 

RubbishCook

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With these criteria I’d look at the kind of stuff that are house knives in pro kitchens rather than knives marketed to home cooks, so +1 Victorinox/Forschner and also Dexter. Not Mercer though
This is what I was looking for since I know a lot of members are professional chefs and was curious what they enjoyed using other than their $1,000 knives they use at home. I have not heard of Dexter. I will take a look.
 

M1k3

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Victorinox Fibrox, followed by pretty much anything labeled NSF, probably has a white handle. Dexter, Update, Winco are a few examples.
 

Hz_zzzzzz

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I think Global knives are dishwasher safe. I gifted a set to a friend a couple of years ago and they are very happy with it. Globals could be chippy if you use them like using Wustof though.
 

GorillaGrunt

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Oh a lot of us use our good knives at work, but there have to be knives around for the cooks who aren’t also knife hobbyists to use. Funnily enough that is about my cutoff - I’ll bring a knife up to $1000 into a working kitchen but I dunno about more than that, and also I don’t know that I’m getting any more practical performance above that price point. Everyone has their own boundaries on those two questions though.
 

coxhaus

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I use a Worksharp Ken Oinion tool and knife sharpener for my kitchen knives. I can sharpen my knives very quickly. I have around 30 kitchen knives. Most are Henckels 4star and 5star knives with maybe 6 or 8 classic Wustof knives. A lot of my Henckels knives are 50 years old as they were my mom's. Recently I have been buying Classic Wustof knives. I have really not noticed much difference in my use. I had a lower end Henckels once and it would not hold an edge so I would only buy the 4-star versions. I am not interested in manually sharpening knives with stones. I don't want any knife that will chip as I cannot guarantee who will end up using my knives. We have parties and there may be 4 or 5 people using knives.

Ken Onion Edition Knife & Tool Sharpener - Work Sharp Sharpeners (worksharptools.com)
 
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dough

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This is what I was looking for since I know a lot of members are professional chefs and was curious what they enjoyed using other than their $1,000 knives they use at home. I have not heard of Dexter. I will take a look.
Wait are you saying people aren’t using their tools at work.... that’s blasphemy. I personally buy the knives only for the boxes.
Not long ago I worked with a guy who sported a well loved Kramer but that’s the only one I ever saw in the wild.
Also the guy having knife parties with 4-5 random people using knives sounds like a great party.
Your budget of $600 for 2 or 3 knives is pretty high you can get a lot of knife for that. For the knife you are talking about I just look for stuff on sale. A used older knife sub $100 would be what I looked to get probably something in aus-8 or vg1. The guys above already covered a lot of easy options. The miyabi knives aren’t bad if you can get them on sale or shun. Those might be a step up from what you were looking at but if on sale they are nice albeit a little hard for a pull through sharpener
 

WaTFTanaki

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Which leads to the question, ignoring the handle issue—why do dishwashers dull blades?

And secondly since the water shoots up, if you put your cutting edge up, rather than down, so that water and soap friction that might dull edge when facing down, would it still dull or even sharpen the edge?
 

Benuser

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Microcorrosion, yes, even with stainless. Leave a stainless edge, fresh from the stones, dirty overnight — tomato sauce is especially effective — and see the difference. Machine detergents are quite aggressive.
 

Jovidah

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^
The thing to keep in mind that stainless is stain-less, not stain-never. That's also why stuff like diving knives is made of different materials than your kitchen stuff (you see a lot of titanium for example).
 

PineWood

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I think Global knives are dishwasher safe. I gifted a set to a friend a couple of years ago and they are very happy with it. Globals could be chippy if you use them like using Wustof though.
A good friend has a set of Globals that he uses/abuses intensely. He has always put them in the dishwasher. After a few years rust develops in the area where the handle is welded to the blade (they look like a "one-piece" design but they are actually welded together). So it's not a good idea to put them in the dishwasher.
 

Hz_zzzzzz

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A good friend has a set of Globals that he uses/abuses intensely. He has always put them in the dishwasher. After a few years rust develops in the area where the handle is welded to the blade (they look like a "one-piece" design but they are actually welded together). So it's not a good idea to put them in the dishwasher.
Good to know. I use a Global bread knife which I did put into dishwasher for several times, but I don’t use it frequently so it hasn’t developed rust. Now I know better. Thanks,
 

Boynutman

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Not an expert in this area, but maybe spend some of that budget on a decent electric sharpener?
Just so the knife isn't eaten alive.
 

Bobby2shots

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I want a nice set of knives for a second home. I want them to be dishwasher safe and work well with an electronic sharpener like a chefs choice (if someone has recommendation for the sharpener I would be curious too).

I am considering Forschner, Opinel Intempora, and GÜDE Kappa. Are there others I should look at that will take well to electronic sharpening and be dishwasher safe?

I am in the USA. I would like to spend $600 or less on 2-3 knives. I really just need a chefs knife and a pairing knife.
Get yourself a few Victorinox and you'll be amazed at the dollar cost vs performance factor. A good honing rod is a necessity with these knives, and they're a breeze to maintain. Personally, I prefer the Rosewood series for the warmth in hand, as well as comfort. It only takes seconds to hand-wash a knife, so, why not??
If you MUST use the dishwasher, then the Fibrox series is the way to go.

Regarding specific choices, I'd recommend the Vic paring knife, and the 6" utility is a MUST!!!!!. I can pretty well guarantee that this will be your most used knife. As for a chef knife, I'd go with a decent 10" blade over the 8" model. That'll depend of course on your personal needs, and the number of people you're cooking for.

Regarding a bread knife, go with the 10" Mercer Millenia......... and,,,, that knife will easily do double duty as a slicer/carver. You'll be shocked at how sharp that knife is straight out of the box. The Santoprene handle is VERY grippy, even when wet, and VERY comfortable to use.

Get yourself a 10" or 12" Idahone "fine" ceramic honing rod, and you probably won't need to re-sharpen for a surprisingly long time. My most frequently used knife is a Vic 6" utility knife which I bought in November, 2018. That knife has yet to require sharpening, and I easily cut see-through tomato slices, etc. A quick touch-up with my steel or my fine ceramic rod, is all that's been required so far. (2 yrs and 7 mo. and still going strong)

If you MUST get an electric sharpener,,,,, the Chef-Choice TriZor is a very good unit. I've got one, but I never need to use it, other than sharpening friends' knives when they bring really cheap and very damaged knives.

I've got roughly 20-25 knives,,, Vic's,, Zwilling Pro "S" and Zwilling Pro, as well as Wusthof Classic and Ikon,. as well as Shun, MAC, and Miyabi Japanese knives. I never forget what great value the Vic's represent. I've got more sharpening gear,,,,stones, etc, than I'll ever need or use; Tormek 10",,,Chef's Choice TriZor,, a bunch (7 or 8) Shapton Glass stones, Naniwa Green Brick of Joy, ,,, 4-stone Norton set, etc. Strops,,, micro-abrasive sheets,,,, stone flatteners,,, you name it,,,, yet I only need a touch-up with my Zwilling steel or my Idahone honing rod for my Vic's (so far)

Good luck
 

coxhaus

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Get yourself a few Victorinox and you'll be amazed at the dollar cost vs performance factor. A good honing rod is a necessity with these knives, and they're a breeze to maintain. Personally, I prefer the Rosewood series for the warmth in hand, as well as comfort. It only takes seconds to hand-wash a knife, so, why not??
If you MUST use the dishwasher, then the Fibrox series is the way to go.

Regarding specific choices, I'd recommend the Vic paring knife, and the 6" utility is a MUST!!!!!. I can pretty well guarantee that this will be your most used knife. As for a chef knife, I'd go with a decent 10" blade over the 8" model. That'll depend of course on your personal needs, and the number of people you're cooking for.

Regarding a bread knife, go with the 10" Mercer Millenia......... and,,,, that knife will easily do double duty as a slicer/carver. You'll be shocked at how sharp that knife is straight out of the box. The Santoprene handle is VERY grippy, even when wet, and VERY comfortable to use.

Get yourself a 10" or 12" Idahone "fine" ceramic honing rod, and you probably won't need to re-sharpen for a surprisingly long time. My most frequently used knife is a Vic 6" utility knife which I bought in November, 2018. That knife has yet to require sharpening, and I easily cut see-through tomato slices, etc. A quick touch-up with my steel or my fine ceramic rod, is all that's been required so far. (2 yrs and 7 mo. and still going strong)

If you MUST get an electric sharpener,,,,, the Chef-Choice TriZor is a very good unit. I've got one, but I never need to use it, other than sharpening friends' knives when they bring really cheap and very damaged knives.

I've got roughly 20-25 knives,,, Vic's,, Zwilling Pro "S" and Zwilling Pro, as well as Wusthof Classic and Ikon,. as well as Shun, MAC, and Miyabi Japanese knives. I never forget what great value the Vic's represent. I've got more sharpening gear,,,,stones, etc, than I'll ever need or use; Tormek 10",,,Chef's Choice TriZor,, a bunch (7 or 8) Shapton Glass stones, Naniwa Green Brick of Joy, ,,, 4-stone Norton set, etc. Strops,,, micro-abrasive sheets,,,, stone flatteners,,, you name it,,,, yet I only need a touch-up with my Zwilling steel or my Idahone honing rod for my Vic's (so far)

Good luck
Would you mind showing me a picture of one of the Victorinox's knives which are better than the Henckels 4star and Wusthof Classic knives? I would like to buy one and try it out against my Henckels 4star and Wusthof Classic knives. I assume they are cheaper. I use a Worksharp Ken Oinion tool and knife sharpener which works for me. Makes sharpening knives real easy. I sharpen at 15 degrees. It seems to work well with my current knives. I have not had any chips.

I need to buy one I can try to get my wife to use so it needs to be smaller. I will use for a while and then try to pass it over to her. If not, I will give it away.

I did this 20 years ago and the red handled Victorinox would not hold an edge like my current knives. I had to sharpen it more.
 
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Jovidah

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I think part of the reason your experience with stuff like Henckels/Zwilling is better than most is exactly because your knives are older. I'm not an expert on this, but it always seems like the further back you go, the better German knives are. Largely because they were still done by hand and ground much thinner behind the edge. These days it's all done by robots and comes out fat & flat, giving you the worst of both worlds: fat knives with crap food release. Sure, they're indestructible, but cutting performance is really underwhelming. The full size bolsters don't help either, but at least most of the brands have at least started a few lines that only have a half-bolster.
 
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