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Knife repair in US?

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Hanmak17

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Hey KKF, disaster struck today and I need recommendation on someone who can repair a serious tip break? Tried JKI, but it looks like they are not taking repair orders during Covid.

Thanks in advance.

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Corradobrit1

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Carbon Knife Co but I think they might be on a hiatus for a couple weeks for remodeling. Also try Strata

What knife is that?
 

M1k3

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What knife is it? A tip repair’s pretty quick. I’ll fix it for cost of shipping, if you want to save money.
He also likes to refinish Honyaki!
Seriously though, he can fix your tip.
 

slickmamba

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I second bernal, but like @ian said, it won't be much work to fix. Making it pretty is a different story
 

Nemo

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I agree with @ian, that's not a super difficult fix.

Would also be interested to know which knife.

How many mm did you lose off the end?

In general, one grinds the spine side down to the edge, then rounds out the distal spine to form a neat curve. Don't try to change the edge profile- leave the edge as it was. You can restore the original profile but I usually leave the distal profile a little more "bullnose" than it was. Maybe I'm too lazy.

I usually use coarse W&D sandpaper mounted on a sandpaper holder, but you could use a coarse stone. After shaping, you can refine the finish on the spine with finer grits. You must obviously be super aware that this is a setting in which you can easily cut yourself. I usually blunt the knife by breadknifing super gently (less than the weight of the knife) on a on my (dry) finest stone. This makes it pretty easy to resharpen once finished.

You may wanna have a look at some old (and some not so old) threads on how to do it and see if you are comfortable to try.

Here is an example:
 

inferno

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if you want to fix it for free you can go to a home improvement store where they sell tools and such. and most likely somewhere you will find some grinder with paper in it. then just fire it up in the store and grind a new tip. just say you are trying it out.
 

ian

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I usually use coarse W&D sandpaper mounted on a sandpaper holder, but you could use a coarse stone. After shaping, you can refine the finish on the spine with finer grits. You must obviously be super aware that this is a setting in which you can easily cut yourself. I usually blunt the knife by breadknifing super gently (less than the weight of the knife) on a on my (dry) finest stone. This makes it pretty easy to resharpen once finished.
If you’re not working on the edge, I’d just tape it off. Then it’s impossible to cut yourself, and you don’t have to resharpen. Even if you do work on the edge, tape it off when you’re working on the spine.
 

Hanmak17

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Thanks all for the feedback. Decided to send the knife to Kevin P. for proper fixing and treatment. Given value of the knife, taper and grind especially near the tip, I didn't want to mess with this. I suspect a fair amount of material is going to need to come off (carefully) to keep the geometry consistent.
 

Hanmak17

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What knife is it? A tip repair’s pretty quick. I’ll fix it for cost of shipping, if you want to save money.
It's a Kato WH 240. Oh and thanks for the offer! I committed to shipping to Kev Friday afternoon.
 
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