Knives that make you go WHOA from the first cut!!

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JakeLoveshighCarbon

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Aside from my initial experience with Jknives, it was actually when I bought a kitayama 8k stone that I started to feel whoa again. Turned all my knives up to 11 after that, even the 15$ henkles.

Now the whoas tend to be more of a long term whoa from knives being able to keep that edge for a long time or by being able to handle some really dense produce more easily than others. The knives that do that are pretty familiar around here.
 

WifeNotUnderstand

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I have copied all of the WHOA items and put them in a table to count

In descending order:

13 - Yosikane - if you include Kashima
8 - TF - both Denka and Mab
6 - Wat
6 - Wakui
5 - Toyama
5 - Shibata
4 - Kono Fujiyama
3 - Kono YS-M (Yosikane)
3 - Kochi
3 - Kippington
3 - Gengetsu
3 - Kato

having one of each would make a great knife block!!
 

Jovidah

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You make stuff thin behind the edge, you make people go whoa. It's the same reason almost everyone who tries a Robert Herder paring knife is a convert from the first cut. If it wasn't for RH providing me the same experience at an earlier point in time the Yoshi would have been on my list too. That 'light cut' without any cracking or wedging on root veg is simply instant gratification the first time you experience it.
 

mc2442

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Kochi was the first WHOA for me, but there have been many, many others since....the Kochi was even after a Devin ITK I believe
 

Benuser

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1. All depends on what you're used to.
2. A lot of factory edges aren't meant to be used as such. Just helpful for the end-user so he can put his own edge on it, with only a few strokes. A factory edge shouldn't be the object of any special veneration. Traditionally, Japanese blades used to come without an edge. The end-user was supposed to sharpen himself — or let the retailer do it for him, at his cost. With today's export this is no longer acceptable. So, there has to be an edge on it. Put on it with a few strokes by the youngest apprentice. A bit of buffering for deburring, and done!
Only some expensive knives and (semi)customs come with a decent edge. Even then it isn't necessarily the kind of edge you're looking for.
3. Don't use an edge with an inclusive angle of 12° with board contact and complain about the steel being chippy.
 

Corradobrit1

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After cutting my teeth on a couple of K-Sabs with the hardness of plasticene, anything was going to give me a WOAH moment. The lucky knife was a TF.
 

Benuser

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After cutting my teeth on a couple of K-Sabs with the hardness of plasticene, anything was going to give me a WOAH moment. The lucky knife was a TF.
Stainless ones, I guess?
Because even soft carbon steel can reach a terrific sharpness due to its fine structure.
 

copacetic

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I'll add to the Yoshikane pile. Just received an SKD Gyuto which led to an exclamation of "Bloody Nora that's sharp!"* Almost made me giggle how it went through some spuds.

*Bloody Nora! - Yorkshire version of Whoa!
 
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