Lodge Blacklock

Discussion in 'Whats Cooking? Food, Drink, & Gear' started by Luftmensch, Sep 10, 2019.

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  1. Sep 10, 2019 #1

    Luftmensch

    Luftmensch

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    Has anybody out there had a look at or used the new Lodge Blacklock line:



    and


    (strange choice of aspect ratio...)

    Seems like a response to the new hipster smoother/thinner cast iron options.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Sep 10, 2019 #2

    Bill13

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    Looks interesting, and I like the longer handle.
     
  3. Sep 10, 2019 #3

    Luftmensch

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    Apparently smoother and lighter...

    The appeal for me is that they are cheaper and more available (depending where you live) than the new fandangled cast iron offerings
     
  4. Sep 10, 2019 #4

    ian

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    Didn’t realize that Lodge made carbon steel either.
     
  5. Sep 10, 2019 #5

    Luftmensch

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    Neither... or enamel for that matter...

    I stumbled upon all this by visiting their website in search of a 5" skillet.
     
  6. Sep 10, 2019 #6

    Paraffin

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    If it's thinner and lighter, doesn't that affect the main reason you'd use cast iron, which is heat retention? I know some of the expensive boutique cast iron pans being made by small shops are also lighter in weight that traditional Lodge cast iron, so maybe that isn't a major issue.

    Anyway, I doubt I'd get one of these due to the "embossed" outer ring and logo on the bottom. I need a flat surface like the traditional Lodge pans for the conductive hobs on our Aga stove top. Especially if the pan is thinner, I think that might lead to hot spots.
     
  7. Sep 10, 2019 #7

    Luftmensch

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    Perhaps yes... perhaps no...

    A skillet cannot be hotter than the burner. Skillets act as capacitor in the system - introducing a lag both heating up and cooling down the food. Less material reduces the lag. I suppose in the limit a zero-thickness pan would have a heat pattern the same as the burner... As you add thickness it will blur over a larger area. I dont think cast iron has any magic properties that make it heat more evenly than other materials... even thick cast iron skillets have hot spots. But cast iron does have a high heat capacity and emissivity.

    At the thickness they manufacture Blacklock skillets they are more comparable to older Griswold and Wagner cast iron. I doubt they would act significantly differently to the thicker Lodge offerings. The reduced wall thickness might make them more prone to cracking or warping but I wouldnt consider that a problem unless it is demonstrated en masse.

    Fair call!
     
  8. Sep 10, 2019 #8

    boomchakabowwow

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    I don’t think thinner and lighter is hipster. At all.

    My old Griswold is thinner and lighter. In your defense they probably had beards (back in the day) as well.

    Nice marketing for sure. Looks like a nice pan in a sea of other nice pans. Nice to have options
     
  9. Sep 10, 2019 #9

    McMan

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    Yup, thinner and lighter is older. The old Griswold's are thin and light--and awesome. As production increased so did thickness... likely because it's more difficult to cast thin than thick. The ring around the outside is called a "heat ring" and is was a feature on pans from a time when they were used on the flat-tops on top of wood and coal stoves. This was another detail that fell by the wayside with production increases.
     
  10. Sep 10, 2019 #10

    ian

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  11. Sep 10, 2019 #11

    Dave Martell

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    From what I've seen on some FB groups this new line isn't any smoother than their standard line has been for the last decade or so, but it is thinner. Lodge is trying to cut into the market share of the small USA producers of cast iron by doing this line but they didn't go the full monty with making them smooth like the small guys do.

    The Blacklock line is being produced in their original factory location that burned down many years ago.

    On their enamelware, I think, is off shore produced.


    PS - I HATE Lodge's seasoning...only thing that could be worse is 3x the amount! :confused:
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
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  12. Sep 11, 2019 #12

    Jville

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    Agree, the smoothness is where it's at. If they don't understand or care about that, it just seems like marketing jibberish, like McDonald's trying to sell "artisan" sandwiches.
     
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  13. Sep 11, 2019 #13

    podzap

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    Yeah, they sell them here in Finland at Motonet (a car parts store chain, no less). I considered them once but didn't like them as they come with a seemingly non-removable orange silicone handle grip which I thought was butt ugly.
     
  14. Sep 11, 2019 #14

    podzap

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    I think it is simply something they use to keep their product from rusting until somebody buys it. First thing I do when I buy a piece of cast-iron, new or 100 years old, is to take it outside and put it on top of my gas burner for about an hour or so. Until it releases the ashes (that's when you know that it is quantitatively clean). Then I season it in the oven with either canola or flaxseed oil.
     
  15. Sep 11, 2019 #15

    parbaked

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    In America the silicon grip is optional...
    https://shop.lodgemfg.com/prodcat/seasoned-steel.asp
     
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  16. Sep 11, 2019 #16

    podzap

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  17. Sep 11, 2019 #17

    Luftmensch

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    :D

    I'm being provocative... Im all for it... but you gotta admit... it is a bit hipster :p

    Bingo... But the advantage is... They are a big enough company to have better developed distribution chains. While the 'small guys' have very appealing options, try purchasing them from the other side of the world! Supposing you could, you would probably swear like a sailor (assuming you dont already) when you saw the shipping charges (after all this is cast iron).

    Why? I dont own any Lodge so I haven't experienced it.... does it flake off?
     
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  18. Sep 11, 2019 #18

    Luftmensch

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    I watched some YouTube videos on the new pans. They seem marginally smoother than the current Lodge pans. Clearly not dead flat like some of the other manufacturers.

    While I prefer smooth (to the extent of sanding pans)... Slight texture does not stop a well seasoned pan from being non-stick. But agreed... if they really wanted to compete with neo-post-vintage cast iron they should have given the cooking surface a better finish.
     
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  19. Sep 11, 2019 #19

    lowercasebill

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    Japanese knives > Japanese cast iron.
    Check out iwachu.
    I have the omelette pan. The same attention to detail form and function as we expect in our knives. Seasoning puts lodge to shame
     
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  20. Sep 11, 2019 #20

    Dave Martell

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    Yes it flakes off.
     
  21. Sep 11, 2019 #21

    Paraffin

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    Interesting! I might try one of those, thanks for the info. Amazon carries them, and the prices aren't boutique-crazy.
     
  22. Sep 11, 2019 #22

    Andrew

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    We have a square pan set from Iwachu and think very highly of it. It took a great seasoning easily (maybe it was unseasoned from the factory) and has been a joy to maintain so far. Not as smooth as the antique options out there, but much better than basic lodge stuff. I was a dummy and brought it back to PDX in luggage from Singapore... didn't think to check amazon first!
     
  23. Sep 11, 2019 #23

    inferno

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    yeah #MeToo i'm on glass stove so this fancy crapola just seems weird. Not gonna help with heat transfer.

    Imo the good cast pans are are always turned in a lathe on the bottom. and they should be concave when cold too. and then when at working temp then they turn flat.
     
  24. Sep 11, 2019 #24

    podzap

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    Lodge has started doing all sorts of fancy **** to the bottom of their pans - US Flags, 12 point bucks, you name it. As most folks move to induction cooktops nowadays, this is not really helpful.
     
  25. Sep 11, 2019 #25

    WildBoar

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    Most folks? Not here in the US that I have seen. Too expensive to put into new construction.
     
  26. Sep 11, 2019 #26

    podzap

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    Oops, sorry. Didn't realize that they were a luxury item in the USA. Here in Europe, you can get them all day long for 300 EUR (Bosch, for example). Most folks HERE have moved to them, would be more precise, then.

    Thanks for the correction.
     
  27. Sep 11, 2019 #27

    inferno

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    I actually dont have induction, i have orange glowing coils underneath a glass plate. dont know whats worse really.
     
  28. Sep 11, 2019 #28

    WildBoar

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    Not a luxury item per say, just a bit more expensive than the super-cheap electric cooktops/ ranges that builders can purchase in bulk. They can get ranges for $400, so that's a cooktop plus an oven. And for 'high-end' homes, it's usually whatever looks the nicest, which will be anything from GE Monogram line, although possibly a gas Viking or Thermador cooktop plus a separate electric oven.
     
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  29. Sep 11, 2019 #29

    podzap

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    I try not to generalize too much, but ya gotta start somewhere. I understood that Lowes is one of your major consumer centers, and St Louis is pretty much in the middle of the country so I googled "St Louis zip codes" and chose 63101 as it was first on the list. I had already googled "lowes induction cooktop" and it had asked me for a zip code, so I entered 63101. The results were quite incredible to me - the lowest prices were about 800 bucks, ranging all the way up to 3000!!!

    Unless I'm seriously drunk and mistaken, you all pay about double what we pay for the same basic induction cooktop. Or maybe St Louis and Lowes were not really that indicative of the current state of affairs in the US consumer economy. Correct me if I'm wrong!
     
  30. Sep 11, 2019 #30

    erickso1

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    St Louis puts Provel cheese on their cracker crust pizzas. They trim the cartridge tops of their spare ribs to make "St Louis Style" ribs. They bread and fry their ravioli.

    Plus my wife is from Kansas City, Missouri. So I try not to use St Louis as a proxy for anything US based.
     
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