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GlassEye

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I am really wanting to get a bread knife longer than the 20cm Wusthoff I am currently using. The Victorinox 14" rosewood is looking pretty good to me, I see it for $45. Does anyone have experience with this knife, how are they? Could I find a better price somewhere? Any other suggestions at a similar price?
Thanks.
 

Eamon Burke

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The Tojiro bread knife is close to that in price, and cuts well without ripping up the bread. I use it for sandwiches about 4 hours a day.
 

GlassEye

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The Tojiro is just shorter than I would like, if they made a longer version I would consider it.
 

Dave Martell

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Is price a problem? If not check out the Güde (the big 32cm model). It's mostly a hard crust knife but it's the most killer bread knife you can get and it's long enough for anything.
 

Eamon Burke

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Is the backside flat on those? If it is, that looks killer. I love sharpening serrations like that(well, as much as I can enjoy sharpening serrations).
 

Dave Martell

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Is the backside flat on those? If it is, that looks killer. I love sharpening serrations like that(well, as much as I can enjoy sharpening serrations).
It's flat on the left side with standard serrations on the right. The serrations are a bit more shallow ground (taller) making for a thinner edge than most serrated knives. It's a beast.
 

zitangy

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Is the backside flat on those? If it is, that looks killer. I love sharpening serrations like that(well, as much as I can enjoy sharpening serrations).
Hi,
same here.. Lately, I also give the rear (side) a few light strokes of the file first and then move to the serrated side, followed by a few strokes on newsprint or a fine stone.

DO you file the "flat" side also?

tks

rgds
D
 

Eamon Burke

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You sharpen by removing steel in the scalloped portion of the blade(between the points), and deburr on the backside. If it gets damaged or fatigued, if the backside is completely flat, you can just abrade the backside down some and voila, new serrations.
 

GlassEye

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Is price a problem? If not check out the Güde (the big 32cm model). It's mostly a hard crust knife but it's the most killer bread knife you can get and it's long enough for anything.
Price is somewhat a problem. I don't handle much bread, often enough to really warrant the Gude; and I should show some restraint this purchase, looking at the past few months.
 

ThEoRy

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Here's me using the Tojiro bread knife.

You can do a lot more than just bread :D

[video=youtube;dvNs4zB6zXg]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvNs4zB6zXg[/video]
 

Dave Martell

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Restaurant supply stores often have some really long bread knives that are pretty cheap. Might be worth checking out of you have one in your area,
 

JohnnyChance

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Yeah my Tojiro does a bit too, the one time I used a Gude it seemed to steer a ton though.
 

Dave Martell

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I always thought that the Gude would be a much better knife with a thicker handle. Maybe that would help control the steering too?
 

JohnnyChance

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Yeah, probably. My Tojiro feels way better with the heftier Kalaeb handle than the stock one.
 

Vertigo

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Price is somewhat a problem. I don't handle much bread, often enough to really warrant the Gude; and I should show some restraint this purchase, looking at the past few months.
Since you don't handle a whole lot of bread, have you considered saving the dough for something you really knead, and just using your go-to gyuto or suji instead?
 

tk59

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Since you don't handle a whole lot of bread, have you considered saving the dough for something you really knead, and just using your go-to gyuto or suji instead?
Yup. I use a suji 95% of the time on bread.
 

tk59

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Does that work for you on the hard, crusty breads?
It's doesn't work too well on the hardest, crustiest breads. In that case, it's basically like wood so you're gonna need a saw (ie serrated). So I have a bread knife that gets used a half dozen times a year or so.
 

Eamon Burke

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I wonder if a very different face grind balance(asymmetry) would control steering, like on the 70/30 Japanese double-bevels.
 

tk59

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I wonder if a very different face grind balance(asymmetry) would control steering, like on the 70/30 Japanese double-bevels.
Sure, it would. You'd make the left side convex and have the right side flat with the scallops, etc. I think it's probably better to just maked the edge double-sided and both faces a little convex or concave.
 
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