Looking for a 240mm gyuto

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by Thrive, Nov 6, 2018.

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums by donating:

  1. Nov 6, 2018 #1

    Thrive

    Thrive

    Thrive

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    US
    I'm looking for a new gyuto, as the title says so I figured this is the place to ask. Here we go. Thanks in advance for any help.

    LOCATION
    What country are you in?

    US

    KNIFE TYPE
    What type of knife are you interested in (e.g., chef’s knife, slicer, boning knife, utility knife, bread knife, paring knife, cleaver)?

    Gyuto

    Are you right or left handed?

    Right

    Are you interested in a Western handle (e.g., classic Wusthof handle) or Japanese handle?

    Japanese

    What length of knife (blade) are you interested in (in inches or millimeters)?

    240mm

    Do you require a stainless knife? (Yes or no)

    Yes

    What is your absolute maximum budget for your knife?

    As little as it takes to get what I want, but no real cap. I'll say $4-500 just to put a number to it.


    KNIFE USE
    Do you primarily intend to use this knife at home or a professional environment?

    Professional

    What are the main tasks you primarily intend to use the knife for (e.g., slicing vegetables, chopping vegetables, mincing vegetables, slicing meats, cutting down poultry, breaking poultry bones, filleting fish, trimming meats, etc.)? (Please identify as many tasks as you would like.)

    The main thing I need it for is slicing partially frozen tuna. Other than that, just general use. Potatoes, carrots, herbs, whatever. I need it to be able to handle whatever I throw at it.

    What knife, if any, are you replacing?

    Kind of replacing a Wusthof 7" santoku.

    Do you have a particular grip that you primarily use? (Please click on this LINK for the common types of grips.)

    Pinch grip 99% of the time.

    What cutting motions do you primarily use? (Please click on this LINK for types of cutting motions and identify the two or three most common cutting motions, in order of most used to least used.)

    Rocking, cross chopping, push/pull or whatever it takes to get the job done.

    What improvements do you want from your current knife? If you are not replacing a knife, please identify as many characteristics identified below in parentheses that you would like this knife to have.)

    I'm looking for something longer than the 7" I have that is chip resistant and low-maintenance while still holding a decent edge.

    Better aesthetics (e.g., a certain type of finish; layered/Damascus or other pattern of steel; different handle color/pattern/shape/wood; better scratch resistance; better stain resistance)?

    Damascus is cool, I like hammered but first and foremost it's a tool and I'll deal with something ugly that works.

    Comfort (e.g., lighter/heavier knife; better handle material; better handle shape; rounded spine/choil of the knife; improved balance)?

    I like my knives on the lighter side, but I imagine what I want for this will be a little heavy. Rounded spine/choil is absolutely preferred but I can do that/have it done if need be.

    Ease of Use (e.g., ability to use the knife right out of the box; smoother rock chopping, push cutting, or slicing motion; less wedging; better food release; less reactivity with food; easier to sharpen)?

    I'd like good food release, low reactivity. Easy to sharpen would be a plus but not a dealbreaker.

    Edge Retention (i.e., length of time you want the edge to last without sharpening)?

    I want to sharpen my knife once every 10 years. But I'll do it when it needs it.


    KNIFE MAINTENANCE
    Do you use a bamboo, wood, rubber, or synthetic cutting board? (Yes or no.)

    Usually synthetic.

    Do you sharpen your own knives? (Yes or no.)

    Yep.

    If not, are you interested in learning how to sharpen your knives? (Yes or no.)

    Already do.

    Are you interested in purchasing sharpening products for your knives? (Yes or no.)

    Already have a set of Shapton Kuromakus. 320, 1500 and 5000. Also have a stropping block.
     
  2. Nov 6, 2018 #2

    Barmoley

    Barmoley

    Barmoley

    SR. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2016
    Messages:
    570
    I am not a pro, so hopefully a few of them will show up. Rocking, cross chopping and partially frozen tuna are tough on knives, especially hard, thin edged Japanese style knives. With that said I've had really good experience with Kaeru 240, form Japanese Natural Stones. It is far below your budget and not as fancy as some, but it has been very durable for me, much more so than I would expect from a SLD (D2) core steel. It is basically stainless, holds an edge very well, is not too difficult to sharpen, but most surprisingly is a very good "beater" knife in the sense that it is very durable. Food release is good too for the medium weight knife. Check it out.
     
  3. Nov 6, 2018 #3

    parbaked

    parbaked

    parbaked

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2017
    Messages:
    442
  4. Nov 9, 2018 at 2:31 PM #4

    Gjackson98

    Gjackson98

    Gjackson98

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2018
    Messages:
    523
    Location:
    Ohio, US
    I can only speak for knives either I have experience with or have I done study on; base on your requirements I think Mazaki Ginsanko gyutos should be a good candidate, if it comes back in time before you make a decision.

    Kaeru will be your best go for the money P4P king yea?

    Also go talk to Jon from JKI, he will give you some good options.

    I know in the other post you have defined that you are interested in a workhorse gyuto, and in this post you have listed that "I like my knives on the lighter side, but I imagine what I want for this will be a little heavy."

    Personally I believe the definition of a workhorse is heavy duty but heavy duty doesn't always equal to heavier weight.

    I am a home cook, with my minimum cutting experience, I will suggest you to look for Workhorse less than 230g with handle for a professional environment (since you like knives on the lighter side).

    Imaging how your arms are going to feel using a 300g knife (which I have) in a professional environment that you have to do thousands of cuts a day in a timely fashion and maybe stressful work environment.

    Like I said before, I am just an inexperienced home cook, many things I said can be wrong.

    Since I have never worked in a professional kitchen, the example I listed above is pure out of imagination; but however I have experienced trying to cook with a 300g WH 10 o'clock at night after getting back from training completely exhausted with my lady sitting on the couch in the living room watching TV while yelling "when is the F***ing dinner gonna be ready, can you hurry up? I am starving!" That's when I know I f***ed up on my choice (however you want to take this lol).
     
  5. Nov 9, 2018 at 3:36 PM #5

    Chef Doom

    Chef Doom

    Chef Doom

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2013
    Messages:
    1,029
    Partially frozen tuna??? Can you say Sabatier? Or Old Hickory?

    With the left over cash you could buy a new video game system, or cocain, whatever your preference may be.
     
  6. Nov 9, 2018 at 5:39 PM #6

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

    HRC_64

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2017
    Messages:
    1,353
    /thread
     
  7. Nov 9, 2018 at 9:14 PM #7

    Thrive

    Thrive

    Thrive

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    US
    I wouldn't actually be using this knife for most things. I need it, as I said, for frozen tuna and such. We got butternut squash in today, it would be nice for that. But for most things I still like my Ikazuchi. So the weight isn't a dealbreaker. I'll check your suggestions and see how I feel.

    Best answer yet. If I can fit a hooker in my budget too, then this will be the way I go.
     
  8. Nov 9, 2018 at 9:33 PM #8

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Messages:
    5,033
    Partially frozen tuna, rock-chopping, walking, if you're coming from a Wüsthof santoku...
    Sounds all a bit problematic with a fine, hard Japanese edge.
    A slightly softer carbon steel, that is much easier in maintenance, would be preferable.
     
  9. Nov 9, 2018 at 11:08 PM #9

    Chef Doom

    Chef Doom

    Chef Doom

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2013
    Messages:
    1,029
    We don't use such mean language in this form. It's Escort Services.

    If you get your 'companion' to get the cocaine she could get it a lot cheaper and pass on the cost savings to you.
     
  10. Nov 10, 2018 at 1:54 AM #10

    Thrive

    Thrive

    Thrive

    Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    US
    I guess this is an open kitchen? Wouldn't wanna scare off the customers I suppose.

    I can't afford any fancy escort that you have to call up and everything. Let's go with "lady of the night" lol.
     

Share This Page