Making Sausages

Discussion in 'Whats Cooking? Food, Drink, & Gear' started by madelinez, Nov 14, 2019.

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums by donating:

  1. Nov 14, 2019 #1

    madelinez

    madelinez

    madelinez

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2018
    Messages:
    176
    I want to get into making my own sausages (lamb or beef) but I have no idea where to start. What equipment do I need, what cuts of meat are best, what secret ingredients do you use?
     
  2. Nov 15, 2019 #2

    Kgp

    Kgp

    Kgp

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2012
    Messages:
    155
    Cured, fresh, fermented? I have three books by Stanley Marianski that covers the gamut. Tons of recipes on the net.
    Decent grinder will set you back $150-200 and go on sale frequently. Stuffer is also critical. Those that just attach tubes to a grinder are a waste of time imho.
    Make sure you have adequate fat, at least 20% to avoid overly dry end result. Try to find tubed casings. Much easier to work with.

    Good luck! It’s a fun hobby.
    Ken
     
    madelinez likes this.
  3. Nov 15, 2019 #3

    madelinez

    madelinez

    madelinez

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2018
    Messages:
    176
    I don't mind spending a good chunk of $$$ upfront on something high quality, do you have any specific recommendations? I'll be starting with fresh sausages but might try cured at some point.
     
  4. Nov 15, 2019 #4

    Kgp

    Kgp

    Kgp

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2012
    Messages:
    155
    I’ve got a LEM .35 hp $240 at Amazon. Cabelas has good selection also. I usually do at least 10 pound batches and it works fine. My stuffer is a Dakota which uses water pressure to push mix into tubes. Weston makes a good grinder also.
    https://www.meatprocessingproducts.com/

    This company has great prices and service. Their tubed casings are best price I could find. You can learn a lot just from their site.
    Another good one:
    https://www.waltonsinc.com/

    lots of recipes and pre-mixed spices.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2019
  5. Nov 15, 2019 #5

    parbaked

    parbaked

    parbaked

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2017
    Messages:
    1,072
    Location:
    Oaktown
    Fat...lot's of it...more than you think you need...so much that anyone watching tells you that it looks like a stupid amount of fat...then add a little more.
     
    ACHiPo, Carl Kotte and Ryndunk like this.
  6. Nov 15, 2019 #6

    Ryndunk

    Ryndunk

    Ryndunk

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2017
    Messages:
    212
    Location:
    Ypsilanti, MI
    More specifically pork fat
     
  7. Nov 15, 2019 #7

    Bert2368

    Bert2368

    Bert2368

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2018
    Messages:
    602
    Location:
    Hellish frozen Northern wasteland, aka MN
    Any reason NOT to use beef fat? Because, I've been saving the excess fat trimmed off all these beef briskets I've been cooking (4 whole briskets since St. Patrick's Day).
     
  8. Nov 15, 2019 #8

    Chuckles

    Chuckles

    Chuckles

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2012
    Messages:
    1,787
    Pay attention when you are mixing. This step is often overlooked. You are going for myosin extraction and then stop. It will feel tacky. I’m not going to go deep into it here but it will make a big impact on the texture of your sausage.

    Here:

    http://thesaltcuredpig.com/Porkopedia/index.php?title=Myosin
     
    M1k3 and Carl Kotte like this.
  9. Nov 15, 2019 #9

    Dendrobatez

    Dendrobatez

    Dendrobatez

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2018
    Messages:
    136
    I use the kitchen aid grinder attachment for home(a buffalo chop grinder at work) its good for small batches. I also use a $90 stuffer from amazon, looks to be made for hunters but is easy enough for small scale production in a pro kitchen setting.
    If you're doing fermentation you'll need some pink salts, a decent scale, a hydrometer, temp gauge, bactoferm wouldn't hurt and a place to cure it. I use dehydratable silica in a sealed refrigerator, it keeps it at a perfect humidity without having to plumb a dehydrator in.
     
  10. Nov 15, 2019 #10

    Michi

    Michi

    Michi

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2019
    Messages:
    1,469
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    I use a meat grinder attachment on my Kenwood Chef. That does the job for 2-4 kg batches, no problem. It works fine for filling casings, too. Other than that, you don't really need anything, except casings, meat, and spices.

    If you want to get carried away, a cold smoker and a separate sausage stuffer would be useful. But, if you've never made sausage before, that can come later. For now, if you have a kitchen mixer already, get a grinder attachment for it. If you don't have a mixer yet, I'd consider buying one plus grinder attachment, rather than buying a dedicated meat grinder. Yes, a dedicated grinder will be better, but you can do only one thing with it. So, if you are not sure whether you want to keep making sausage in the long term, a mixer is a better investment because you can use it for lots of other things as well.
     
  11. Nov 15, 2019 #11

    Caleb Cox

    Caleb Cox

    Caleb Cox

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2019
    Messages:
    97
    Location:
    Danville, VA
    Most people greatly prefer the flavor and mouthfeel of pork fat in sausage.
     
  12. Nov 15, 2019 #12

    Ryndunk

    Ryndunk

    Ryndunk

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2017
    Messages:
    212
    Location:
    Ypsilanti, MI
    Pork fat also acts different than beef fat. It does not smear as much when grinding and mixing. It is a little easier to get the desired texture also. Beef fat does work. But there is a higher risk of the sausage coming out "broken".
     

Share This Page