Maksim's re-handling method - glue type

Discussion in 'The Kitchen Knife' started by Deshi, Apr 27, 2019.

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  1. Apr 27, 2019 #1

    Deshi

    Deshi

    Deshi

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    I've found Maksim's videos on changing wa handles videos very simple, clear and informative:




    But I've been unable to decipher the name of the the paste-like material he uses (in part 2) to firmly bond the tang to the handle, after he's seated the tang by burning it into the handle. A comment on the part 2 video asked what this material was, but Maksim has not replied.

    Can anyone help identify this material?

    Having battled with removing a handle attached with epoxy, I'd like to use a bonding material that's solid, but not so permanent.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Apr 27, 2019 #2

    F-Flash

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    Beeswax
     
  3. Apr 27, 2019 #3

    parbaked

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    You can use a glue gun and hot glue....just heat to remove.
     
  4. Apr 27, 2019 #4
    He used beeswax there (maybe mixed with some mineral oil as pure wax os quite hard)
     
  5. Apr 27, 2019 #5

    Deshi

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    Interesting - thank you, F-Flash!

    Since the material in Maxim's video appears to be a a fairly soft paste, I assume it's some sort of blend of beeswax with carnauba wax, mineral oil or something similar. It seems like this sort of blend wouldn't harden and solidify, but presumably it does, or he wouldn't use it.

    I'd be grateful for any suggestions for a particular brand or a recipe for mixing my own. Or would it be effective to simply melt pure beeswax, which would certainly solidify when cooled.
     
  6. Apr 27, 2019 #6
    I would use a pure wax and a hot air gun.
     
  7. Apr 27, 2019 #7

    McMan

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    The tang is held in by the burn in. The beeswax is just there to keep water out of the tang slot.

    If you want the beeswax to harden, heat a bit in the microwave then work quickly. Otherwise, heat then add mineral oil. No real recipe, just add mineral oil, let cool, and repeat if you think it's still too thick. If too thin, add more beeswax. Mineral oil and beeswax (aka "board butter") is good on cutting boards.
     
  8. Apr 27, 2019 #8

    Deshi

    Deshi

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    Many thanks to you all - always amazing how generous community members are in sharing their expertise!

    These solutions sound simple, maybe even idiot-proof - which is a key consideration for me!
     
  9. Apr 27, 2019 #9

    F-Flash

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    I just push small pieces of pure beeswax to tang hole, untill its full. Hot tang melts the wax so its super easy. Or you can melt them with small blowtorch.

    Pure wax gets super hard, so blade stays safely put, even if the hole aint that tight.
     
  10. Apr 27, 2019 #10

    JBroida

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    i have seen installations with beeswax that come loose in professional kitchens where it can get really hot. Some brands of hot melt glue work better and the handles can still be removed at knife-safe temps. Also, i've seen people use suguru (which i originally heard about from maksim, as he had been using that too)
     
  11. Apr 28, 2019 #11

    HRC_64

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  12. Apr 28, 2019 #12

    Nemo

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    Yeah, interesting looking stuff. I wonder if it's food-safe. Or if that even matters given it should be well hidden in the handle. It's also unclear whether it softens under heat (I assume not given that it says that it can be touched up to 180C).
     
  13. Apr 28, 2019 #13

    Michi

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    I’ve used Sugru for various repair jobs, such as frayed cables. It works well. It probably would be fine for knife handles, too (but I haven’t tried that myself).
     
  14. Apr 28, 2019 #14

    Nemo

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    Easy to find in Oz? Or ordered online?
     
  15. Apr 28, 2019 #15

    Michi

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    I ordered online. Be aware that it needs to be kept in the fridge and used up within about three months, so don't stock up on it unless have plans for it. A little goes a long way.
     
  16. Apr 28, 2019 #16

    Bensbites

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    The DIY version is cornstarch and silicone, google for the exact recipe.
     
  17. Apr 28, 2019 #17

    Deshi

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  18. May 1, 2019 #18

    NO ChoP!

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    I use 5 min epoxy with a bit more hardener. When smacked with the 2x4 method, it usually cracks loose; no heat/ boiling needed, yet it still provides a solid and moisture free bond.
     
  19. May 1, 2019 #19

    maxim

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    I also have seen now some use plastic beads in Japan :p quiet cool idea as handle can also be removed after that. Toyama uses wood filler on his knives, But i am always in favor of using something that you can remove handle after. If you really want your handle permanently then Epoxy is the way to go
     
  20. May 1, 2019 #20

    Luftmensch

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    I use a mixture of bees wax and tung oil (use 100% natural tung oil for food safety).

    My hunch is that it is a little more durable than mineral oil as the tung oil should set over time. My knives don't see professional duty cycles and I only have a sample size of N=2! So my hunch is untested and remains just that... a hunch :p

    My process it part pressure fit, part 'cast' in wax/oil:
    • If the tang hole is too big I make little shims out of paddle pop sticks to create a pressure fit (probably unnecessary)
    • Wrap the handle in masking tape except for the tang hole.
    • Heat the wax/oil mixture (cant remember the ratio) to molten.
      • I keep the oil/wax mixture in jar. I liquefy the mixture in a water bath - I put the jar in a sauce pan and fill the pan with water up to the level of the wax/oil mixture. Heat until the mixture has liquefied fully.
    • Over newspaper, pour the molten wax into the tang. Fill to maybe three quarters.
    • Insert the tang (including shims). The tang should displace wax/oil out of the hole - this aught to mean all nooks and crannies are filled. The masking tape will protect you from an annoying cleaning job.
    • Tap the bottom of the assembly (like Maksim's videos) to get a pressure fit. More wax/oil may be forced out the hole.
    • Before the wax/oil solidifies, adjust the alignment.
    • Once the wax/oil is solid, unwrap the masking tape removing any overflow mess with it.
    The wax/oil should protect the tang by keeping moisture out. As @F-Flash says... pure wax gets super hard. Even the wax/oil mixture cools to quite a tough substance. So once the assembly sets, it become really rigid!
     
  21. Oct 4, 2019 #21

    atb

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    How would would putty/plastic wood work?
     
  22. Oct 5, 2019 #22

    dafox

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    Do you know what Kaeru uses?
     
  23. Oct 5, 2019 #23

    Bensbites

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    I don’t know this for sure, but after my latest kono rehandle, I would bet good money that was held in with hot melt glue.
     

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