Microbevel

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by Qwerty12345, Dec 25, 2018.

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  1. Dec 25, 2018 #1

    Qwerty12345

    Qwerty12345

    Qwerty12345

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    Hey guys,

    Quick question. If I sharpen my yanagi how I’m supposed to sharpen will the microbevel go away? I feel when I do the sharpie trick and kept sharpening my yanagiba, the microbevel mark was still there. I feel my yanagi isn’t as sharp or stays sharp for a long time with the micro bevel, so I’m trying to get rid of it.
    And if it takes a while to get rid of the micro bevel, do I keep sharening the microbevel until it’s gone? Sorry for all these questions! Hopefully I can get the answer. Thanks guys and sorry I’m new to this.
     
  2. Dec 26, 2018 #2

    Brandon Wicks

    Brandon Wicks

    Brandon Wicks

    AKA blwchef/crustychef Supporting Member

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    Yes you would sharpen until microbevel is gone. What stones are you using? What kind of yanagi is it?
     
  3. Dec 26, 2018 #3

    Qwerty12345

    Qwerty12345

    Qwerty12345

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    Gesshin uraku white #2. And I am using a 2000 grit stone and a 6000 as a finisher at the moment. I do have a 1000 though. That’s my lowest.
     
  4. Dec 26, 2018 #4

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Benuser

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    Don't be afraid to use a really coarse stone. It works very fast, so there's no loss of attention that may occur.
    My favourites are the Shapton Glass 220 and Naniwa Pro 400.
     
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  5. Dec 26, 2018 #5

    Ryndunk

    Ryndunk

    Ryndunk

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    Yes. Sharpen on a coarse stone till the micro bevel is gone. Just remember to not sharpen the ura side on the coarse stone.
     
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  6. Dec 30, 2018 #6

    refcast

    refcast

    refcast

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    Given your stones, I would sharpen on the 1000 grit.

    Two options:
    (1) You can sharpen at an angle that is between the current microbevel and the kireha (the bevel with the hagane and jigane). This creates a new microbevel that is steeper. Blend into a hamaguri on kireha mostly nearby the edge. This makes a clamshell nearby the edge as opposed to the whole bevel.
    (2) You lay the kireha flat and sharpen with pressure nearby the edge until the microbevel is gone. This creates a flat kireha. Cuts will go in easier because it is thinner behind the edge. Removing slices from the blade is slightly harder because the flat kireha is easier to stick to food than a slight hamaguri one, where food has to curve to stick to it, and food doesn't like to curve.

    Here there is a diagram of where the kireha is:
    https://www.korin.com/about-japanese-knives


    Yeah, the ura is there to deburr with finishing stones after sharpening on along the kireha.
     
  7. Jan 12, 2019 #7

    rick alen

    rick alen

    rick alen

    Senior Member

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    Microbevel I feel should be no more than a very few light stropping strokes at the higher angle. That should also remove the last vestiges of any burr remnant left by your previous burr removal efforts.
     

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