Mineral Oil vs Tsubaki Oil

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Southpaw

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Hey quick question. My Camelia oil broke in my drawer (so much fun) and I’m just double checking that Mineral Oil is safe to use on blades. No idea why it wouldn’t be safe, but I’d rather not learn the hard way.
 

tostadas

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Hey quick question. My Camelia oil broke in my drawer (so much fun) and I’m just double checking that Mineral Oil is safe to use on blades. No idea why it wouldn’t be safe, but I’d rather not learn the hard way.
I've used it without any issue. I also apply it directly on handles, if that's a concern.
 

ian

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It would work fine. I think camelia is nice because it’s more viscous than the mineral oil I’ve tried, but mineral certainly works.
 

Yet-Another-Dave

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... checking that Mineral Oil is safe to use on blades....
For sure, it won't harm the blade. But I'm not sure how it'll stay on the blade for long term rust protection, which I assume is your goal. (Never tried it.)

OTOH- I read once, likely here, that most "camellia oil" sold in the US is just scented mineral oil. Since I don't read Japanese I haven't checked what the bottles say to try and verify that.

Something else to consider is Jojoba oil. (It is sold and promoted by Lie-Nielson Toolworks as an edged-tool protective oil.) It's very waxy for an oil and just barely liquid at room temps. (I got some frozen in shipping and it took about 3 days to "thaw" at normal room temp.) It's available around here with beauty and healthcare supplies, even at our local Trader Joe's. It also seems to consistently be cheaper than Camellia oil and I can confirm it's effective.
 

Up_dog128

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As long as it's food grade mineral oil, it'll be safe. I regularly use it on blades that aren't going to be seeing much use for awhile
 

Logan09

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I have been using mineral oil for years on blades. No issues, even when you forget about them down your basement for 9 years or so....
 

big_adventure

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Any food-grade mineral oil is fine. It's totally safe and will absolutely protect blades and wood. I use a bottle I bought off of Amazon, it's perfect.

The only thing you want to avoid is cosmetic grade mineral oil, like Johnson & Johnson Baby Oil. It won't hurt you, but it generally has some fragrance components that you probably don't want on your board, blades or handles.
 

Walla

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As others have mentioned...as long as it is food or medical grade mineral oil you're good to go...it doesn't go rancid so long-term use is fine. It is actually used medicinally as a laxative...and has many other uses as well...

Industrial grade mineral oil should be avoided as they are not refined enough and still contain some pretty questionable stuff (ie. Known carcinogens)

Take care

Jeff
 

tally-ho

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Something else to consider is Jojoba oil. (It is sold and promoted by Lie-Nielson Toolworks as an edged-tool protective oil.) It's very waxy for an oil and just barely liquid at room temps.
This made me realized that it seems just like shea butter (non cosmetic).
Shea butter can be used for cooking since it's edible. It's like butter so it needs to be warmed in the palm of a hand before rubbing the blade in your palm. I bought a small jar in an organic shop, was sold with cosmetic products but it has no scent or pigment added. I never thought to use it on a reactive blade so I grabbed as small aogami super folding knife (spyderco caly 3) a few hours ago to test it since I don't know if shea butter is completely neutral with reactive steel.
 

4phantom

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I've read either are fine! personally I use tsubaki though, but many use mineral from what I've heard
 
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