Misono ux10

Kitchen Knife Forums

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums:

Chefgary85

Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
5
Location
Uk
After using predominantly shun knives for the last 10 years, I've been very happy with their performance.a little chippy & overly blingy perhaps but they have served me well.
I whittled my choices for a new gyuto down to a mac pro or a misono ux10.
Decided to go with the misono & it's currently awaiting dispatch.
Heard lots of positives & a few negatives regarding the knife but I cant wait to try it for myself!
 

dafox

Supporting Member
Joined
May 27, 2017
Messages
1,236
Reaction score
317
Location
Colorado
I've been wondering what grits people sharpen this steel with. Its 19c27, the same steel as in Suisin Inox Honyaki.
 

Chefgary85

Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
5
Location
Uk
Would also appreciate any advice on sharpening the ux10.im by no means an expert with whetstones.ive maintained my shuns on a king 1000/6000 stone to a perfectly acceptable(to me anyway) edge but I'm aware of the 70/30 edge to the misono.any pointers would be great.Id really like to keep the knife for protein work only so keeping it razor sharp would be beneficial.
 

ian

Supporting Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2017
Messages
2,432
Reaction score
3,000
Location
Boston, MA
After using predominantly shun knives for the last 10 years, I've been very happy with their performance.a little chippy & overly blingy perhaps but they have served me well.
I whittled my choices for a new gyuto down to a mac pro or a misono ux10.
Decided to go with the misono & it's currently awaiting dispatch.
Heard lots of positives & a few negatives regarding the knife but I cant wait to try it for myself!
I thought mine was a bit difficult to sharpen. The steel felt really glassy on the stones. That was a while ago, though. The asymmetry isn’t too big of a deal if you don’t stress too much about it. Just remember you’re trying to correct for any steering caused by the asymmetric grind, so if it doesn’t steer, it’s good! If it does, change the angles / amount of time on the two sides to compensate.
 

Benuser

Supporting Member
Joined
May 3, 2011
Messages
6,275
Reaction score
723
After using predominantly shun knives for the last 10 years, I've been very happy with their performance.a little chippy & overly blingy perhaps but they have served me well.
I whittled my choices for a new gyuto down to a mac pro or a misono ux10.
Decided to go with the misono & it's currently awaiting dispatch.
Heard lots of positives & a few negatives regarding the knife but I cant wait to try it for myself!
Misonos come with an overly convexed and polished edge, far more conservative than needed and rather weak, due to the factory buffering. You shouldn't try to replicate it. I hope your retailer offered a first stone sharpening. Otherwise, start with a medium-coarse stone and make sure you get rid of the factory edge. You best have the right bevel convexed, ending at some 12°, and the tiny left one straight at a much higher angle, to make steering acceptable by balancing friction on both sides. Here a very thick blade, a yo-deba by Misono, to get an idea.
With a new Misono, I start on the left side with a 18° straight bevel until I've raised a burr — with a few strokes. On the right, I start at the lowest possible angle to thin bit, and only raising the spine little by little, by small steps. Will take some time. End at some 10-12° and raise a good burr. Use a marker and a loupe to check your progress and make sure you've reached the very edge. Don't stop before you've got a perfectly clean edge on your coarse stone.
 

Noodle

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
23
Reaction score
3
Location
Pac NW
I know it's too late, but the 210mm UX10 was my first decent knife--years ago--and I found it amazing, life changing (really) and quickly became my "go to" tool in the kitchen. But over time, I found it super difficult, for me at least, to sharpen and keep sharp. After discovering that other steels were easier to deal with, I've moved on. Also, I eventually went 50/50 with it. I still love the profile though... maybe I'm just used to it, but find it very nimble and useful. If there is a super similar profile in something else, I'd be interested in hearing about it.
 

inferno

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 11, 2018
Messages
2,259
Reaction score
837
I've been wondering what grits people sharpen this steel with. Its 19c27, the same steel as in Suisin Inox Honyaki.
i would stop at 2-3k. its not a fine grained SS and its not powder. i dont have any 19c27 blades though.
 

Benuser

Supporting Member
Joined
May 3, 2011
Messages
6,275
Reaction score
723
Interesting, @Noodle. In my limited experience with the UX-10, it isn't the easiest one, but not that hard if you're not fighting against it. The steel is loved for its bite, so don't try to get it overly smooth and polished. With this steel I use stones above 2k only for deburring. Makes life much easier and enhances the steel's properties.
 

Benuser

Supporting Member
Joined
May 3, 2011
Messages
6,275
Reaction score
723
i would stop at 2-3k. its not a fine grained SS and its not powder. i dont have any 19c27 blades though.
Funny coincidence. 19C27 has large, though uniformly distributed carbides.
 

Chefgary85

Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
5
Location
Uk
Thanks to all for advice.much appreciated.
Just out of curiosity, does anyone know the year the ux10 was introduced?
When I first attended catering college in 2001 the choices seemed so much more limited.we all showed up with the victorinox we had saved hard for(no1 had the rosewood handles mind you) the very flash kids had global(seemed like the holy grail in those days) or the heavy wusthof tridents.my lecturer had a full set of ancient gustavs
 
Last edited:

dafox

Supporting Member
Joined
May 27, 2017
Messages
1,236
Reaction score
317
Location
Colorado
I know it's too late, but the 210mm UX10 was my first decent knife--years ago--and I found it amazing, life changing (really) and quickly became my "go to" tool in the kitchen. But over time, I found it super difficult, for me at least, to sharpen and keep sharp. After discovering that other steels were easier to deal with, I've moved on. Also, I eventually went 50/50 with it. I still love the profile though... maybe I'm just used to it, but find it very nimble and useful. If there is a super similar profile in something else, I'd be interested in hearing about it.
This is my favorite shape and profile.
The Misono moly has the same profile and geometry, AUS8. The no longer made Kikuichi TKC has a similar shape and profile. And I have been told the JCK Deep impact has a similar profile https://japanesechefsknife.com/coll...ep-impact-series-gyuto-180mm-to-240mm-3-sizes
 

Noodle

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2019
Messages
23
Reaction score
3
Location
Pac NW
Interesting, @Noodle. In my limited experience with the UX-10, it isn't the easiest one, but not that hard if you're not fighting against it. The steel is loved for its bite, so don't try to get it overly smooth and polished. With this steel I use stones above 2k only for deburring. Makes life much easier and enhances the steel's properties.
I’ll give that a whirl next time. I only have a 500-1000-5000 progression, I always felt 1000 was too rough, but maybe it’s meant to be with this steel—OR I can use this excuse to try a 2000 stone. Thx.

Thanks to all for advice.much appreciated.
Just out of curiosity, does anyone know the year the ux10 was introduced?
When I first attended catering college in 2001 the choices seemed so much more limited.we all showed up with the victorinox we had saved hard for(no1 had the rosewood handles mind you) the very flash kids had global(seemed like the holy grail in those days) or the heavy wusthof tridents.my lecturer had a full set of ancient gustavs
Don’t know about the exact history, but definitely was around since the 1990’s b/c I bought mine at Korin during our first visit out to NY then.

This is my favorite shape and profile.
The Misono moly has the same profile and geometry, AUS8. The no longer made Kikuichi TKC has a similar shape and profile. And I have been told the JCK Deep impact has a similar profile https://japanesechefsknife.com/coll...ep-impact-series-gyuto-180mm-to-240mm-3-sizes
I always wanted to try Aogami Super—so this is interesting. (Kinda like wa handles though, at this point). Also want to try ginsan or a stainless clad white if there’s a version of that out there. I think the thing about the UX10 I always appreciated was that it was pretty thin—a lot thinner than the German things I had been using until that point—but never felt delicate or flimsy like some laserish type knives. I’ve beat that thing a lot and it’s been tough as nails.
 

Benuser

Supporting Member
Joined
May 3, 2011
Messages
6,275
Reaction score
723

Chefgary85

Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
5
Location
Uk
Received the misono.
First impressions I'm very impressed by how light & nimble it is.
Makes my shun gyuto's feel clumsy by comparison.
From the box the blade didnt feel scary sharp but it passed the paper test with aplomb & shaved a strip from my ape like leg with ease.
Perhaps the blade is deceptive.
The handle feels small but not a big issue.
It feels suited to protein work.
Not a knife to smash through mirepoix or carcasses of course (my ancient dick pro gets these unenviable tasks)
Next to the shun premier it feels like I've transitioned from a mallet to a scalpel.
It's incredibly poised.
I can certainly see why it has such a dedicated following!
 
Top