My favorite color is BLUE!.............A patina thread.

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TSF415

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JNS Munetoshi 210mm. Burnt the handle, reshaped/polished the ferrule, did a good amount of thinning, then full sandpaper progression to naturals.

Original grind arrived thicker than my Mazaki. It's still full convex, but much more responsive now.


How did you reshape the ferrule ?
 

tcmx3

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corollary question, how did the burning go? I havent found a ton of info on dying/burning ho wood and this is one of the things that keeps me from buying some of Maxim's knives (and the Kato/Toyama I have bought have since gotten new handles)
 

tostadas

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How did you reshape the ferrule ?
I clamped the knife between 2 pieces of 2x4 to hold it in place. I marked off the endpoint of the taper with some masking tape, then used a flat file wrapped with sandpaper and slowly sanded it by eye. Started with 220grit and went up to 2500. The horn ferrule is really easy to sand down so it didnt take much effort. Instead I just focused on making sure it was flat/even. It was actually pretty minimal reshaping, and more of an experiment to get an idea of what feels good, so maybe I can use similar ideas for the future. Here's a pic of the profile with the front part of the D tapered down (the left side also got a little bit).
PXL_20210516_230112960.jpg

corollary question, how did the burning go? I havent found a ton of info on dying/burning ho wood and this is one of the things that keeps me from buying some of Maxim's knives (and the Kato/Toyama I have bought have since gotten new handles)
This is the first attempt I made at scorching the ho handle. I used a bernzomatic 8000 and propane which I bought for sous vide. Theres some more info in my other post, but in general I just protected the ferrule and went max heat on the wood super quick. I experimented with different textures using a wire brush, but after scorching it didnt seem to make much of a difference. I suspect the specific piece of wood used for the handle has more affect on the final product than any pre-treatment.

The end result definitely feels like an improvement over the stock ho which feels really cheap. The burnt handle feels like a tighter grain structure, and also a bit smoother.
 
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