Name that one most underrated knife

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SHOWERDOOKIE

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I think copper is only toxic in pans that aren’t bonded with another metal and use the copper as the actual cooking surface that comes j to contact with the food, I don’t think using it in contact with your food has any negative effects in a general sense as long as you’re using the pans as directed, I have seen people invert pans and heat the basin for different things.

also a quick edit: I’m far from any kind of scientist, this is just my understanding
 

Ruso

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While true, those are now known toxic items and were discovered before the information age. Today's standards for information is way different than ever in history of the world. Not saying something won't be found to be toxic in the future, just that it'll be well known in minutes.
Where can you buy a modern bare copper pan? AFAIK the standard is to clad the coper or at least line the cooking surface with another material.
 

kevpenbanc

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Completely agree!
I bought a hunting knife made by him a couple of years back as a gift when my dad turned sixty. Very impressive.
Since then I've gotten the chance to test drive a 240 mm gyuto in R2 which performed great, and looked damn sexy and alluring while doing so.
He never gets much mentions here on the forum, but I think his blades(metallurgy and all that aside, which is a given), are quite unique and have a very distinct character. I remember I loved the handle shape for the profile on that particular knife, but I guess that combo is more or less standard with his gyutos.

I would tout his work more often, but I'm generally a bit cautious when it comes to giving out either glowing or very critical mentions/recs when I have such a small sample size to refer to.
Saji is the real deal in my book!
I've got one of Takeshi Sajis VG10 blades, a 180mm gyuto, one of the first 4 japanese blades I bought and used a lot by my wife.
Along with a rainbow damascus 180mm bunka, quite heavy(ish) at 227g but a very good cutter.
Also got to try one of his 240mm diamond damascus gyutos.
All very good knives and all very beautiful.
They've never come up in my consideration of the best knives I have, but they are all very good knives and I have no regret owning the 2 I have.
 

AFKitchenknivesguy

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Where can you buy a modern bare copper pan? AFAIK the standard is to clad the coper or at least line the cooking surface with another material.
Not what I was getting at, but no clue. The original point was the copper in knives, which probably has some cladding.
 

Corradobrit1

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Where can you buy a modern bare copper pan? AFAIK the standard is to clad the coper or at least line the cooking surface with another material.
Exactly. They're tinned, even the vintage ones.
 

M1k3

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What’s nonsense are the internet warriors who doesn’t hesitate on passing mis-judgements without doing research.

Many things practiced over centuries haves been found harmful.

Copper pots could make you sick, the heavy metal leaches into your diet when cooking with acidic food, & it’s harmful, read it for yourself:

Time to rip out all the copper piping!
 

soigne_west

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I personally think the thick copper foiling that some makers are using, looks terrible. Subjective I know...

5CDD1679-5047-4AEC-A75D-BD1C5C1D2C2B.jpeg


my vote for best under rated knife goes to Bessaku. Atleast the butchering knives... great steel and dirt cheap.
 

Midsummer

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Copper is also an essential trace element for humans. Trace Elements in Human Physiology and Pathology. Copper - PubMed

"Copper is a trace element, important for the function of many cellular enzymes. Copper ions can adopt distinct redox states oxidized Cu(II) or reduced (I), allowing the metal to play a pivotal role in cell physiology as a catalytic cofactor in the redox chemistry of enzymes, mitochondrial respiration, iron absorption, free radical scavenging and elastin cross-linking. If present in excess, free copper ions can cause damage to cellular components and a delicate balance between the uptake and efflux of copper ions determines the amount of cellular copper. In biological systems, copper homeostasis has been characterized at the molecular level. It is coordinated by several proteins such as glutathione, metallothionein, Cu-transporting P-type ATPases, Menkes and Wilson proteins and by cytoplasmic transport proteins called copper chaperones to ensure that it is delivered to specific subcellular compartments and thereby to copper-requiring proteins."

It is more a question of amount.

Traditionally unlined copper mixing bowls were used for egg whites. Apparently the copper helps to stabilize the protein matrix.
 

Blerghle

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Yeah I have an unlined copper bowl. I had read that if you use the copper bowl, there's no need to add an acid when making meringue. So a useful reaction in some cases anyway. I can't imagine it being a safety hazard used in these proportions in a damascus inlay.
 

Qapla'

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my vote for best under rated knife goes to Bessaku. Atleast the butchering knives... great steel and dirt cheap.
Which company's Bessaku? Bessaku just means "especial-made". Masahiro, Kanehide, and other vendors make knives labeled Bessaku.
 

soigne_west

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From what I can tell there basically all VERY similar. I’ve had masahiro and kanehide and only tea difference was handle material and kanji.
 

rickbern

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Just to toss a little fuel on the copper fire, I thought I’d link to this article.

Granted, nobody’s talking about cooking on it, but that metal has been used for a reason


An excerpt
Larrouy-Maumus is betting on copper alloys. The ions in copper alloys are both antiviral and antibacterial, able to kill over 99.9% of bacteria within two hours. Copper is even more effective than silver, which requires moisture to activate its antimicrobial properties.

“Copper is the top surface to use because it has been used by mankind for three millennia,” says Larrouy-Maumus. “The [Ancient] Greeks were already using copper for their cooking and medical use.”
 

Corradobrit1

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And its used in pool products as Copper Sulphate as an algicide.
 

Skippydoo

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I think copper should be safe. There's a new expensive Tog knife with magic anti microbial copper Damascus. Seem so exceptionally expensive for A440 steel
 

Henry

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Ken Kageura (retired) knives. Some don't like them as they are a little fat but ascetically, one of the most beautiful knives I have used. Beauty is subjective but in my opinion they are more beautiful than a River Jump or dare I say, a Shig. The beauty is understated and humble.
IMG_2017.jpeg
 

Luftmensch

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The copper discussion piqued my interest. The wiki page has a summary on cookware. Seems like mindful use poses little harm to a healthy person. People with an inherited disease or 'abuse' of the cookware (constant acid cooking and storage) may fall ill.


While true, those are now known toxic items and were discovered before the information age. Today's standards for information is way different than ever in history of the world. Not saying something won't be found to be toxic in the future, just that it'll be well known in minutes
I don't know about that... it probably depends who has the bigger lobby?

The hazards of asbestos were noted fairly soon after it was industrialised. It was known to be problematic in the 1920s/1930s*. It only got banned in Australia 50 years later in the 80's. In Australia, if you live in a house/apartment that was constructed before the 1980's - you are probably only a few metres away from asbestos. Some analysts think there will be a second wave of asbestosis/mesothelioma cases as home DIY renovators unwittingly expose themselves to the old building materials...



* Strictly speaking - I know that this is before the information age and digital definition. But I think it is modern enough that this information could be shared widely via newspapers, radio and eventually TV.
 

Luftmensch

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One of the most underrated knife makers on our forum is takeshi saji. He makes beautiful knives and has a wonderful damascus with ironwood handles and he is very appreciated in Japan. Unfortunately I can't remember anyone here talking about his knives.
I owe him a debt of gratitude for being my introduction to handmade Japanese knives. I never owned one but got to cook with them for extended periods. There is nothing wrong Saji knives - competent performers! 👍
 

ragz

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I would like to add Tsutomu Kajiwara. Super cheap, definitely odd, nevertheless super fun. They are hefty and have wonderful taper. For the taller blades they get a little wedgy. I'm suprised with the popularity of workhorse style knives he goes relatively ignored. He's a real hidden gem.
 

GorillaGrunt

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I would like to add Tsutomu Kajiwara. Super cheap, definitely odd, nevertheless super fun. They are hefty and have wonderful taper. For the taller blades they get a little wedgy. I'm suprised with the popularity of workhorse style knives he goes relatively ignored. He's a real hidden gem.
Have you had a Murata? How do the two compare?
 
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