Naniwa Diamond Stones

Discussion in 'Sharpening Station' started by Nemo, Jan 3, 2019.

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  1. Jan 3, 2019 #1

    Nemo

    Nemo

    Nemo

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    I note that KnS has started stocking these.

    Has anyone used them?

    How do they perform in terms of speed and feedback?

    Are the splash & go?

    Do they produce mud or a contrast?

    How does one flatten them?

    Any other important info?

    Thanks for your insights.
     
  2. Jan 3, 2019 #2
  3. Jan 3, 2019 #3

    Nemo

    Nemo

    Nemo

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  4. Jan 3, 2019 #4

    Pensacola Tiger

    Pensacola Tiger

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    You're welcome.

    If the Naniwa diamond stones are anything like Jon's diamond stones that I have, then:

    - They are fast, but have a much different feedback from a traditional waterstone.

    - They are 100% splash and go, and shouldn't be soaked at all.

    - They produce zero mud. I've never tried to produce contrast with mine, but I highly doubt that they would.

    - Flattening is not an issue. I've had my stones for several years, use them at least once a week to touchup three or four knives, and they aren't in need of flattening. When (and if) they do, Jon sells a couple of flattening solutions: one for $70 (https://www.japaneseknifeimports.co...ucts/gesshin-extra-large-stone-fixer-100-grit) and one for $400 (https://www.japaneseknifeimports.co...nes/products/diamond-300a-stone-and-flattener). I'd assume you could flatten the Naniwa stones with either alternative.
     
  5. Jan 3, 2019 #5

    Nemo

    Nemo

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    Thanks also for that write up. Fairly similar to what I had assumed, although it is interesting to note that they can be flattened with normal flattening tools.
     
  6. Jan 3, 2019 #6

    JBroida

    JBroida

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    I wouldn’t recommend flattening them with a diamond plate, but the large pink things work well

    Also, the ones I sell feel different from the naniwa ones... speed and dish resistance is similar though
     
  7. Jan 3, 2019 #7

    panda

    panda

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    i inquired about these while back just out of curiosity, but the jki 1k/6k set is freaking awesome, i'll pick up a set myself one of these days.
     
  8. Jan 4, 2019 #8

    bennyprofane

    bennyprofane

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    I recommend the Chinese DMD stones, they are at least as good as the Naniwas (I think the DMD are faster) and much cheaper. I have all four of them and am very happy with them. They are available here:

    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/100...inding-Stone-Whetstone-HT325/32716558253.html

    Here is a thorough review of these stones:

    https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=auto&tl=en&u=http://kochmalscharf.freeforums.net/thread/1511/dmd-diamond-stones

    What Pensacola Tiger writes about his diamond stone describes these very well.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2019
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  9. Jan 15, 2019 #9

    catalystman80

    catalystman80

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    I have a set of these (600, 1k, 3k, and 6k), and though I love them, I don't often use them as I find them to be highly specialized. If your typical application is anywhere from a typical/traditional Hitachi steels (white/blue) to VG10, AUS-8 etc., it's really a waste of money as plenty of regular synthetics sharpen them just as easily with likely better feedback. It starts to make a bit of difference when you start using them for ZDP189/HAP40, but I'd imagine most seasoned sharpeners will be perfectly fine using the more prevalent synthetics instead. It makes definite difference when it gets to higher Vanadium content steels, which aren't all that common with kitchen cutlery anyways - so I use these mostly for my folding knives in various "super steels" (e.g. S90v, S110V, Maxamet, etc.). So it's fun for me from hobby standpoint, but I wouldn't get them for general use as I don't think the cost is worth it.

    If you do get them, using the "dressing stone" that comes with each stone between every couple of sessions is really helpful for refreshing the surface and makes a noticeable difference in speed. Initially I didn't use it at all because it looked really rough and low quality, but someone on IG schooled me on it :) It doesn’t create slurry, but refreshes the surface I suppose exposing fresh diamond particles. Kind of like how hard Arkansas (translucent and blacks) stones work better with a matte finish instead of highly polished (though some will disagree). In use, the feedback is muted, but very consistent feel throughout the lineup. Burr removal is pretty easy on it for some reason (which is great). And it also seems to polish higher than what the grit numbers represent (at least compared to their Chosera/Naniwa professional synth counterparts).
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019

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