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Naniwa Gouken Kagayaki (2000)

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KingShapton

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Is there anyone here who can compare the Naniwa Gouken Kagayaki series with the Naniwa Superstone or Naniwa Sharpening Stone series? Someone who ideally has both series or knows from personal experience?

According to a video I saw, the Naniwa Gouken Kagayaki 2000 does not seem to clog.
If that's true then Naniwa would have really improved the series (based on the Superstones), that would be extremely interesting ...

Here is the link to the video

It gets interesting at 8:38
 

inferno

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i wonder if its not like this: they only have a few chemical formulations.
like hibiki, pro/chosera, ss, traditional, lobster.
then they just package them different or they are different thickness. i wouldn't be surprised at least if there only was 4-5 actual formulations. and then just different names/sizes/thickness/packaging/markets. just like suehiro does. they definitely think different there.
 

KKL81

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I just got the 20mm Kagayaki 400 and it says SS400 + some more numbers on the side. I don't know if this means anything or not. Unfortunately I don't have any older true SS, so I cannot compare.

The stone I have is very efficient at removing thinning scratches and it leaves a surprisingly fine scratch pattern for a 400. It releases more grit than what I expected from reading reviews on other (mostly higher grit) SS stones, and the slurry creates a haze on cladding where I was expecting something more specular. Perhaps this is a characteristic of lower grit "true" SS as well, I don't know, I could not find reviews that mention it.
 

M1k3

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I just got the 20mm Kagayaki 400 and it says SS400 + some more numbers on the side. I don't know if this means anything or not. Unfortunately I don't have any older true SS, so I cannot compare.

The stone I have is very efficient at removing thinning scratches and it leaves a surprisingly fine scratch pattern for a 400. It releases more grit than what I expected from reading reviews on other (mostly higher grit) SS stones, and the slurry creates a haze on cladding where I was expecting something more specular. Perhaps this is a characteristic of lower grit "true" SS as well, I don't know, I could not find reviews that mention it.
My SS 220 is really muddy and creates a hazy, not scratchy, finish.
 

cotedupy

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Afraid I don't know any others apart from my Naniwa Gouken Kagayaki 3K. It seems to clog, or do something weird, almost instantly.

When used with a nagura to clean it / raise some slurry it's a good stone, and finer than my other 3k. But it's annoying af to use.

(I bought it only a few months ago).
 

KingShapton

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Afraid I don't know any others apart from my Naniwa Gouken Kagayaki 3K. It seems to clog, or do something weird, almost instantly.

When used with a nagura to clean it / raise some slurry it's a good stone, and finer than my other 3k. But it's annoying af to use.

(I bought it only a few months ago).
As a result, the Kagayaki Stones would not be an improved form of the Super Stones.

Thank you for your impressions, that helps me.
 
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