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Naniwa pro400 or shapton glass500

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IsoJ

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Hoping to get a few opinions :).

I would like to try Naniwa pro400 or Shapton glass 500 double thick(around the same price). Planning of using the stone as a starter and jump to shapton pro2000. Maybe use the stone for thinning/reprofiling progress too as a second or third stone.

My main sharpening setup at the moment is Naniwa pro800,3000 and Kitayama 8000.

Other stones that I have:
Shapton glass 320, I use it mainly for my softer Zwillings etc., Feels a bit coarse as a starter stone for my other knives
Shapton Pro 120 used it few times for thinning
Cerax 320 used it few times for thinning.
Cerax 1000 and Rika 5000, havent used them yet.

Which one would you get or neither and why?
 

Doffen

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I have both (Chosera and standard GS500). Difficult to tell which are best. I like Naniva on white and blue steel, and shapton on pm steel.
I think Naniwa have better feel and feedback.
 

IsoJ

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I have both (Chosera and standard GS500). Difficult to tell which are best. I like Naniva on white and blue steel, and shapton on pm steel.
I think Naniwa have better feel and feedback.
Thanks. Does the naniwa feel coarser than sg or are they about the same?
 

daveb

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I'm a fan of the SP1000, 2000 and done progression. When I need the coarser grit I drop to the SG500. The 500 makes me want to try some of the other glass stones.
 

M1k3

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I'm a fan of the SP1000, 2000 and done progression. When I need the coarser grit I drop to the SG500. The 500 makes me want to try some of the other glass stones.
I like the 4k also..
 

Ruso

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Naniwa Pro 400 should be around 600grit. Naniwas Pro are finer than the regular JIS scale. I do not have SG500 but I like Pro 400 for what it is. If I have to speculate, SG 500 is faster and more aggressive. Naniwa prolly has better feedback and feel.
 

Runner_up

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Agree with the above that the Naniwa has better feedback and feel. I do think the SG500 is a fast stone and I overall really like it. It is one of my most used stones and will always be a fixture in my lineup.
 

nevrknow

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Nothing wrong with these recs. Personally, I love the glass stones for my PM Steel EDC knives.

I like some of the Naniwas for my kitchen knives.
 

IsoJ

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I like the feel and feedback a bit more than the speed at least for now, mind may change in time. So propably going to get the Naniwa from Dictum.
 

IsoJ

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Thanks for the opinions, I ordered the Naniwa
 

Doffen

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You will not be disappointed. For my most used knives, and I want some speed, this is what I bring up.
 

inferno

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Hoping to get a few opinions :).

I would like to try Naniwa pro400 or Shapton glass 500 double thick(around the same price). Planning of using the stone as a starter and jump to shapton pro2000. Maybe use the stone for thinning/reprofiling progress too as a second or third stone.

My main sharpening setup at the moment is Naniwa pro800,3000 and Kitayama 8000.

Other stones that I have:
Shapton glass 320, I use it mainly for my softer Zwillings etc., Feels a bit coarse as a starter stone for my other knives
Shapton Pro 120 used it few times for thinning
Cerax 320 used it few times for thinning.
Cerax 1000 and Rika 5000, havent used them yet.

Which one would you get or neither and why?
the correct answer here is "both" :)
 

zizirex

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I have both, the Naniwa pro cuts faster but the feedback and feel are not as nice as Shapton Glass especially when it's new, the first layer is horrible as a brick. The Shapton Glass is slightly slower but finishes nicer than the Naniwa. Naniwa Pro is better if you want to create a new bevel or sharpen a really dull knife, but if you want a nicer progression, SG is more versatile.

For me the Inbetweeners is the Morihei Hi 500, it cuts as fast as Naniwa Pro, but finishes like Shapton Glass. the downsides are it will soak up water for the first sharpening and dishes faster than all of three but still not as crazy as Cerax (which is super duper king of dishes).
 

inferno

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i dont actually have the naniwa/chosera but i have had the 500 glass for several years and i noticed that when it was brand new it cut like crazy. and then after the first flattening it cuts maybe half as fast. but finer.

same thing but even worse with the glass 220 and pro 220.

so these stones really need to be flattened and resurfaced with loose grit SiC powder on glass plates. only then will you get the speed back. otherwise the 220 behaves likes a quite fast 500. and the 500 like a slightly faster 1k. when i reality they are at the very least twice as fast.

so with stones under 1k, especially harder stones, its very important to get the surface roughness right, because this is basically whats doing the actual cutting, not the grit number.

a shapton pro 220 will eventually assume the really agressive surface condition if you just work it and leave the slurry on there. maybe takes 10 minutes.
but after 10 minutes its time for flattening since the stone dishes. and if you do this with diamonds then youre back to square one again. i only have the 220 glass and pro and no other really coarse ones (except diamonds), but i guess its the same with all of them. loose grit...
 

inferno

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and the diamond stones gets finer too. my diaflat plate feels like a 3-400 or so now. and my dmt 325 feels like a 1k, and my atoma 400 just feels slow. and quite ******.
 

Ruso

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I heard there are some health concern with SiC grits. What’s your take on it? Do you have a dedicated sharpening place like garage or basement?
 

M1k3

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I heard there are some health concern with SiC grits. What’s your take on it? Do you have a dedicated sharpening place like garage or basement?
Loose SiC isn't Skittles.
 

inferno

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I heard there are some health concern with SiC grits. What’s your take on it? Do you have a dedicated sharpening place like garage or basement?
you basically sprinkle the powder on a wet glass surface so i'd say the risk of inhaling the powder is pretty slim. all ceramics are dangerous to inhale but its not very easy to do when working with wet stones. its the same as stone slurry, same "risks" involved.

after the sound changes to a smoother sound the grit is worn out and you add more (edit: well the grit gets finer, it breaks down). this can take as little as 30-60 seconds with some very hard stones (spydercos).

user stefan wolf on youtube has many videos where he flattens and conditions stones with SiC.
skip to 5 minutes in to see how it works.


 

inferno

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i think it might be relatively safe to eat it. or it might not. its a very inert chemical. takes about 2500 deg C to kill it with fire at least :)
 

Ruso

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you basically sprinkle the powder on a wet glass surface so i'd say the risk of inhaling the powder is pretty slim. all ceramics are dangerous to inhale but its not very easy to do when working with wet stones. its the same as stone slurry, same "risks" involved.

after the sound changes to a smoother sound the grit is worn out and you add more (edit: well the grit gets finer, it breaks down). this can take as little as 30-60 seconds with some very hard stones (spydercos).

user stefan wolf on youtube has many videos where he flattens and conditions stones with SiC.
skip to 5 minutes in to see how it works.


I still have SiC powder and I used SiC before. I use glass plate as well for this. The problem is that I sharpen using sink bridge and by proxy I was using SiC in the kitchen.
After reading about SiC and safe handling I decided to stop using it in the Kitchen. Also many guidelines allude to possible cancer concerns even just by being in contact with SiC powder, let alone inhaling ( the worst) or eating eat.

So dunno, I kinda thinking to move SiC operation to balcony and use gloves which would suck when using SP 120 :/ so many trips to refresh the stone.
 
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