Norway calling

Discussion in 'New Member Check-In' started by Halvor, Jun 7, 2019.

Help Support Kitchen Knife Forums by donating:

  1. Jun 7, 2019 #1

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Norway
    Hi all,

    Stopped by here mostly to learn about sharpening, but as I have a tendency to fall into rabbit holes, who knows what might happen :rolleyes:

    Knives at home include Shun and a few Masahiros, plus some Germans. Masa gets the most use - good grip and balance, and it's easily kept and sharpened. Stonewise, we are talking whetstones from Japan, but only cheaper ones. One Naniwa super, one unbranded double sided, but I have to get back to you on the grits. Plus, I have a hard time believing the given grits, as it's basically only one of the three I can get to really have an effect (and the jumps shouldn't be too high either).

    Looking forward to learning and posting and am glad you'll have me.
     
  2. Jun 7, 2019 #2
    Welcome Halvor.
     
  3. Jun 7, 2019 #3

    Nemo

    Nemo

    Nemo

    Staff Member Global Moderators

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2016
    Messages:
    3,918
    Location:
    Southern NSW (Aus)
    Welcome to some very deep rabbit holes, Halvor
     
  4. Jun 7, 2019 #4

    Qapla'

    Qapla'

    Qapla'

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2018
    Messages:
    61
    Welcome.

    What characterizes the knives of Norway?
     
  5. Jun 7, 2019 #5

    CoteRotie

    CoteRotie

    CoteRotie

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2015
    Messages:
    205
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Welcome! Know any good Swede jokes?
     
    Isasmedjan likes this.
  6. Jun 8, 2019 #6

    Unique98

    Unique98

    Unique98

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2018
    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    Australia
    Welcome Halvor !
     
  7. Jun 8, 2019 #7

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Benuser

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2011
    Messages:
    5,525
    Welcome aboard, Halvor!
     
  8. Jun 9, 2019 #8

    Gjackson98

    Gjackson98

    Gjackson98

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2018
    Messages:
    851
    Location:
    Ohio, US
    Welcome!
     
  9. Jun 9, 2019 #9

    Slipstenar

    Slipstenar

    Slipstenar

    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2012
    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    Sweden
    Well, welcome!!
    We need to balance out this forum a bit with more guys from the Nordic countries.

    Med vänlig hälsning / Best regards
    Niclas Gudmundsson
     
    playero and Isasmedjan like this.
  10. Jun 10, 2019 #10

    Marek07

    Marek07

    Marek07

    Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2016
    Messages:
    1,186
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Hei og velkommen Halvor!

    Don't listen to @Nemo. I'm yet to see the bottom of one of these holes. :rolleyes:
     
  11. Jun 10, 2019 #11

    Michi

    Michi

    Michi

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2019
    Messages:
    1,025
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    That's because they are wormholes. Space-time is warped such that the hole loops back onto itself, so you can follow it down forever… ;)
     
  12. Jun 10, 2019 #12

    Nemo

    Nemo

    Nemo

    Staff Member Global Moderators

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2016
    Messages:
    3,918
    Location:
    Southern NSW (Aus)
    I don't think we are talking about space-time here. It's apparently the dimensionally distinct money-time
     
  13. Jun 10, 2019 #13

    Michi

    Michi

    Michi

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2019
    Messages:
    1,025
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    You can't take it with you…
     
  14. Jun 10, 2019 #14

    Nemo

    Nemo

    Nemo

    Staff Member Global Moderators

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2016
    Messages:
    3,918
    Location:
    Southern NSW (Aus)
    Money or time?

     
  15. Jun 10, 2019 #15

    Isasmedjan

    Isasmedjan

    Isasmedjan

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    147
    Välkommen!
    Always fun to see more Scandinavians here :)
    Cheers
    Jonas
     
  16. Jun 11, 2019 #16

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Norway
    Thanks kindly for the welcomes, and tjenare to my neighbours ;)

    I've just splurged and ordered a few additional whetstones to get my inventory up to standards: 'splash and go' 1000 and 2000 grits Kuromaku/Shapton Pro, then took a different course and went with Suehiro Rika 5000 based on recommendations. Had a look at the ones I have and found that the Naniwa Super I have is 400. So that should have me well covered (and will be interesting to compare now to the double sided 1000/3000 I have, which I can't get to work with and for me). Edit: Had a looksee now and the double seems to be a Naniwa as well, though not a Super. Similar to this one. So the question is, jump from 400 to 1000 too much, or the actual grits on this higher than reported?

    @Qapla' Knives and Norway: What can I say, there's a tradition for making short bladed outdoors utility and hunting knives with single, long and flat bevel/s (usually on both sides). There are also Sami knives around, obviously, of a much larger size. Not much tradition for kitchen knives, but the major producers do all kinds.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
  17. Jun 11, 2019 #17

    Michi

    Michi

    Michi

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2019
    Messages:
    1,025
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    400 to 1000 is no problem at all.
     
  18. Jun 11, 2019 #18

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Norway
    Thanks. No, I figured it shouldn't be. So that leaves either the reported grit being off -- or my technique. Is it more difficult to use harder stones in that they provide less feedback? Or could it perhaps be a matter of the quality (difference) of the stones?
     
  19. Jun 11, 2019 #19

    Michi

    Michi

    Michi

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2019
    Messages:
    1,025
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    The stones you have should be pretty much true to grit. If you don't get a good edge, chances are it's your technique. The stones are almost never to blame. (You can get a knife razor sharp with pretty much any paving stone or common brick.)

    If your knives are blunt, establish a new edge first with your 400. Once you have done that, you shouldn't need that stone ever again, unless you damage your knives or don't re-sharpen them when you should. After the 400, you should have a really sharp edge that cuts paper easily. (The edge will have some teeth and not be perfectly smooth, but it should be very sharp.)

    Then use the 1000 to refine the edge. With your soft-steel German knives, you can stop there. There really isn't any point in going beyond 1000 grit for those. For harder Japanese steels, you can refine the edge with the 5000 once you are happy with what you can get with the 1000.

    When the knives start showing signs of blunting, maintain with the 1000 grit (or, if you catch them early enough, the 5000 grit).

    Check out Jon's videos at https://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/blogs/media as well as Peter Nowlan's videos at https://www.knifeplanet.net/knife-sharpening-school-online-course/

    For a no-nonsense and very well presented introduction, I also recommend this one:

     
    Halvor likes this.
  20. Jun 11, 2019 #20
    This is what the Shapton 2000 was born for!
     
  21. Jun 11, 2019 #21

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Norway
    Underway, so I’ll be able to verify that for myself shortly!
     
  22. Jun 12, 2019 #22

    erickso1

    erickso1

    erickso1

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2014
    Messages:
    211
    Welcome. I’m not a full blooded but my family is from there about 3 generations ago. I’d love to hear more about traditional Norwegian styles and manufactures though, as I think both my Dad and I would be interested.

    Thanks,
    Nicholas Erickson
     
    Halvor likes this.
  23. Jun 12, 2019 #23

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Norway
    My knowledge is limited, I’m afraid. Granddad and my uncle both made knives and sheaths themselves, but have both passed and with them the craft skills in the family..

    Ever been over here, then, to walk in the paths of your ancestors? Do you know where exactly in the country they lived before migrating?
     
  24. Jun 12, 2019 #24

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Halvor

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Norway
    Brilliant, many thanks! So would you say that technique matters more the higher up in grit one comes? Ie that it’s easier on low grit, and that this is why I’ve struggled? Will watch videos.

    I do have to note, though, that I did get a few of the knives to a rather decent condition edgewise — while also getting the blade a little scratched up:
    image.jpg

    Is there a good resource on the angles and bevels of different kinds of knife makes anywhere btw? Or do you guys usually just set a new one to your liking? The Masa above, IIRC, is 80/20.
     
  25. Jun 12, 2019 #25

    Michi

    Michi

    Michi

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2019
    Messages:
    1,025
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    When I first started, I found that I had a good edge after a 1000 stone, and a worse edge after a 5000 stone. Two reasons: poor angle control (wobbling too much), and I was using too much pressure on the 5000 stone, in effect destroying the edge I had established with the 1000 stone.

    So, yes, I'd say that technique probably does get more important on the finer grit stones.

    I recommend watching Peter Nowlan's videos. He pays a lot of attention to pressure and explains why it's important to get that right. Those videos are definitely worth your time.

    I'll let other members comment on asymmetric bevels; I don't have enough experience with them to say anything meaningful.
     

Share This Page